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List Of Mammals Of The Marshall Islands
This is a list of mammals of the Marshall Islands. There is one land mammal, the Polynesian rat. There are 27 marine mammals, one of which has been classified as vulnerable, the humpback whale.[1]Contents1 Marine mammals1.1 Whales 1.2 Dolphins2 Notes 3 External referencesMarine mammals[edit] The 27 marine animals consist mostly of whales, dolphins, and porpoises. Whales[edit]Spinner dolphinWhales include Humpback whales, Ginkgo-toothed beaked whale, Blainville's beaked whale,[1] blue whale, sei whale, Fin whale, and sperm whale.[2] Dolphins[edit] Dolphins include Spinner dolphin, Fraser's dolphin, Long-beaked common dolphin, and Pygmy killer whale.[1] Notes[edit]^ a b c [1] ^ [2]External references[edit]"The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: Mammals of the Marshall Islands". IUCN. 2001. Retrieved 22 May 2007. [dead link] "Mammal Species of the World". Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. 2005. Archived from the original on 27 April 2007
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Polynesian Rat
The Polynesian rat, or Pacific rat ( Rattus
Rattus
exulans), known to the Māori as kiore, is the third most widespread species of rat in the world behind the brown rat and black rat. The Polynesian rat originated in Southeast Asia, and like its relatives, has become widespread, migrating to most Polynesian islands, including New Zealand, Easter Island, and Hawaii. It shares high adaptability with other rat species extending to many environments, from grasslands to forests. It is also closely associated with humans, who provide easy access to food. It has become a major pest in most areas of its distribution.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Behaviour3.1 Diet4 Rat
Rat
control and bird conservation4.1 New Zealand 4.2 Rest of Pacific5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] The Polynesian rat
Polynesian rat
is similar in appearance to other rats, such as the black rat and the brown rat
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Fin Whale
The fin whale ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
physalus), also known as finback whale or common rorqual and formerly known as herring whale or razorback whale, is a marine mammal belonging to the parvorder of baleen whales. It is the second-largest mammalian on the Earth after the blue whale.[7] The largest reportedly grow to 27.3 m (89.6 ft) long[8] with a maximum confirmed length of 25.9 m (85 ft),[9] a maximum recorded weight of nearly 74 tonnes (73 long tons; 82 short tons),[10] and a maximum estimated weight of around 114 tonnes (112 long tons; 126 short tons). American naturalist Roy Chapman Andrews
Roy Chapman Andrews
called the fin whale "the greyhound of the sea ... for its beautiful, slender body is built like a racing yacht and the animal can surpass the speed of the fastest ocean steamship."[11] The fin whale's body is long and slender, coloured brownish-grey with a paler underside
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Vulnerable Species
A vulnerable species is one which has been categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
as likely to become endangered unless the circumstances that are threatening its survival and reproduction improve. Vulnerability is mainly caused by habitat loss or destruction of the species home. Vulnerable habitat or species are monitored and can become increasingly threatened
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Pygmy Killer Whale
The pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata) is a poorly known and rarely seen oceanic dolphin.[2] It derives its common name from sharing some physical characteristics with the killer whale. It is the smallest species that has "whale" in its common name.[3] Although the species has been known to be extremely aggressive in captivity, this aggressive behavior has not been observed in the wild.[4] The species had been described by John Gray in 1874, based on two skulls identified in 1827 and 1874. The next recorded sighting was in 1952 which led to its formal naming by Japanese cetologist Munesato Yamada in 1954.[5]Contents1 Description1.1 Early records 1.2 Distinguishing from other dolphin species2 Echolocation and hearing 3 Population and distribution 4 Conservation 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit]Skeleton of a pygmy killer whaleThe pygmy killer whale is dark gray to black on the cape and has a sharp change to lighter gray on the sides
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Fraser's Dolphin
Fraser's dolphin
Fraser's dolphin
(Lagenodelphis hosei) or the Sarawak
Sarawak
dolphin is a cetacean in the family Delphinidae
Delphinidae
found in deep waters in the Pacific Ocean and to a lesser extent in the Indian and Atlantic Oceans.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Population and distribution 4 Conservation 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksTaxonomy[edit] In 1895, Charles E. Hose
Charles E. Hose
found a skull on a beach in Sarawak, Borneo. He donated it to the British Museum. The skull remained unstudied until 1956 when Francis Fraser[1] examined it and concluded that it was similar to species in both the genera Lagenorhynchus
Lagenorhynchus
and Delphinus but not the same as either. A new genus was created by simply merging these two names together
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Sperm Whale
Physeter catodon Linnaeus, 1758 Physeter australasianus Desmoulins, 1822The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) or cachalot /ˈkæʃəˌlɒt, ˈkæʃəˌloʊ/ is the largest of the toothed whales and the largest toothed predator. It is the only living member of genus Physeter and one of three extant species in the sperm whale family, along with the pygmy sperm whale and dwarf sperm whale of the genus Kogia. The sperm whale is a pelagic mammal with a worldwide range, and will migrate seasonally for feeding and breeding.[3] Females and young males live together in groups while mature males live solitary lives outside of the mating season. The females cooperate to protect and nurse their young. Females give birth every four to twenty years, and care for the calves for more than a decade
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Long-beaked Common Dolphin
The long-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus capensis) is a species of common dolphin. It has a more restricted range than the short-beaked common dolphin (D. delphis). It has a disjointed range in coastal areas in tropical and warmer temperate oceans. The range includes parts of western and southern Africa, much of western South America, central California
California
to central Mexico, coastal Peru, areas around Japan, Korea
Korea
and Taiwan, and possibly near Oman.[1][3] Vagrants have been recorded as far north as Vancouver Island. They live in shallow, warmer temperature waters near the coast
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Sei Whale
The sei whale (/ˈseɪ/ or /ˈsaɪ/) ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
borealis) is a baleen whale, the third-largest rorqual after the blue whale and the fin whale.[3] It inhabits most oceans and adjoining seas, and prefers deep offshore waters.[4] It avoids polar and tropical waters and semienclosed bodies of water
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Humpback Whale
The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 m (39–52 ft) and weigh about 36,000 kg (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is known for breaching and other distinctive surface behaviors, making it popular with whale watchers. Males produce a complex song lasting 10 to 20 minutes, which they repeat for hours at a time. Its purpose is not clear, though it may have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 km (16,000 mi) each year. Humpbacks feed in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or subtropical waters to breed and give birth when they fast and live off their fat reserves. Their diet consists mostly of krill and small fish
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Blainville's Beaked Whale
Blainville's beaked whale
Blainville's beaked whale
( Mesoplodon
Mesoplodon
densirostris), or the dense-beaked whale, is the widest ranging mesoplodont whale and perhaps the most documented. The French zoologist Henri de Blainville first described the species in 1817 from a small piece of jaw — the heaviest bone he had ever come across — which resulted in the name densirostris (Latin for "dense beak").[2] Off the northeastern Bahamas, the animals are particularly well documented, and a photo identification project started sometime after 2002.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Population and distribution 4 Behavior 5 Conservation 6 Specimens 7 Gallery 8 References 9 External linksTaxonomy[edit] Blainville named the species Delphinus densirostris, based on the description of a nine-inch piece of rostrum of unknown origin housed in the Paris Museum
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Ginkgo-toothed Beaked Whale
The ginkgo-toothed beaked whale ( Mesoplodon
Mesoplodon
ginkgodens) is a poorly known species of whale even for a beaked whale, and was named for the unusual shape of its dual teeth. It is a fairly typical-looking species, but is notable for the males not having any scarring.Contents1 Description 2 Population and distribution 3 Behavior 4 Conservation 5 Specimens 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] Ginkgo-toothed beaked whales are more robust than most mesoplodonts, but otherwise look fairly typical. Halfway through the jaw, there is a sharp curve up where the ginkgo leaf-shaped tooth is. Unlike other species such as Blainville's beaked whale
Blainville's beaked whale
and Andrews' beaked whale, the teeth do not arch over the rostrum. The beak itself is of a moderate length
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Humpback Whales
The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 m (39–52 ft) and weigh about 36,000 kg (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is known for breaching and other distinctive surface behaviors, making it popular with whale watchers. Males produce a complex song lasting 10 to 20 minutes, which they repeat for hours at a time. Its purpose is not clear, though it may have a role in mating. Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 km (16,000 mi) each year. Humpbacks feed in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or subtropical waters to breed and give birth when they fast and live off their fat reserves. Their diet consists mostly of krill and small fish
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Spinner Dolphin
The spinner dolphin ( Stenella longirostris) is a small dolphin found in off-shore tropical waters around the world. It is famous for its acrobatic displays in which it spins along its longitudinal axis as it leaps through the air. It is a member of the family Delphinidae
Delphinidae
of toothed whales.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Ecology 4 Behavior and life history4.1 Spinning behavior5 Conservation status 6 Images 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTaxonomy[edit] The spinner dolphin is sometimes referred to as the long-snouted dolphin, particularly in older texts, to distinguish it from the similar Clymene dolphin, which is often called the short-snouted spinner dolphin. The species was described by John Gray in 1828. The four named subspecies are:Eastern spinner dolphin (S. l. orientalis), from the tropical eastern Pacific. Central American or Costa Rican spinner dolphin (S
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Blue Whale
The blue whale ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the baleen whales (Mysticeti).[3] At up to 29.9 metres (98 ft)[4] in length and with a maximum recorded weight of 173 tonnes (190 short tons)[4] and probably reaching over 181 tonnes (200 short tons), it is the largest animal known to have ever existed.[5][6] Long and slender, the blue whale's body can be various shades of bluish-grey dorsally and somewhat lighter underneath.[7] There are at least three distinct subspecies: B. m. musculus of the North Atlantic and North Pacific, B. m. intermedia of the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
and B. m. brevicauda (also known as the pygmy blue whale) found in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean. B. m. indica, found in the Indian Ocean, may be another subspecies
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