HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

List Of Ethnobotanists
This is a list of ethnobotanists.Isabella Abbott Michael Balick Paul Alan Cox Wade Davis Maria Fadiman Erna Gunther Shakti M
[...More...]

"List Of Ethnobotanists" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mark Plotkin
Mark J. Plotkin (born May 21, 1955) is an ethnobotanist and a plant explorer in the Neotropics, where he is an expert on rainforest ecosystems. Plotkin is an advocate for tropical rainforest conservation.Contents1 Background and career 2 Works 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBackground and career[edit] After attending Isidore Newman School
Isidore Newman School
in New Orleans, Plotkin worked at Harvard University's Museum of Comparative Zoology when he joined an expedition searching for an elusive crocodilian species in 1978 and was galvanized into returning to education. He completed his bachelor of liberal arts degree at the Harvard Extension School, his master's degree in forestry at Yale School of Forestry, and his Ph.D
[...More...]

"Mark Plotkin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Isabella Abbott
Isabella Aiona Abbott (June 20, 1919 – October 28, 2010) was an educator and ethnobotanist from Hawaii. The first native Hawaiian woman to receive a PhD
PhD
in science,[1] she became the leading expert on Pacific algae.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Death 4 Works 5 See also 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Abbott was born Isabella Kauakea Yau Yung Aiona in Hana, Maui, Territory of Hawaii, on June 20, 1919. Her Hawaiian name means "white rain of Hana" and she was known as "Izzy".[3] Her father was ethnically Chinese while her mother's ancestry was predominantly[clarification needed] Native Hawaiian
[...More...]

"Isabella Abbott" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ulrich Willerding
Ulrich Willerding (born 8 July 1932 in Querfurt, Germany) is a professor emeritus of botany at the Göttingen University, Germany. He is also an instructor at a local high school. Willerding is one of the leading European palaeo-ethnobotanists.[1] He has specialized in Medieval Europe but also done work on other times. One of his special interests is weeds. He has worked on bibliographies of European paleoethnobotany. Although a biologist by training, he has worked extensively with archaeologists. Selected publications[edit]"Göttingen: II. Die Pflanzenreste aus der bandkeramischen Siedlung," NAFN II, 1965. "Mittelalterliche Pflanzenreste von der Büraburg," in Burg - „Oppidum“ - Bischofssitz in karolingischer Zeit ed
[...More...]

"Ulrich Willerding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ina Vandebroek
Ina Vandebroek is an ethnobotanist working in the areas of floristics, ethnobotany and community health. Since 2005, She has worked at The New York Botanical Garden in the Institute of Economic Botany. She has seventeen years of experience working on ethnobotanical projects in North America (including the Caribbean) and South America. She has conducted research and international cooperation projects in Bolivia, the Caribbean and New York City. Currently she conducts fieldwork in New York City and Jamaica. She has been interviewed about her work on PBS, WNBC, The Wall Street Journal, The Smithsonian Magazine, National Geographic's The Plate and The New York Times.[1][2][3][4][5][6].Contents1 Education 2 Career2.1 Ghent University 2.2 The New York Botanical Garden3 Other work 4 Selected publications4.1 Books 4.2 Selected peer-reviewed journal articles5 References 6 External linksEducation[edit] In 1991, Vandebroek received a BSc
[...More...]

"Ina Vandebroek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Nancy Turner
Nancy Jean Turner (born 1947) is a notable North American ethnobiologist, originally qualified in botany, who has done extensive research work with the indigenous peoples of British Columbia, the results of which she has documented in a number of books and numerous articles.Contents1 Life 2 Order of British Columbia 3 Bibliography3.1 Books written 3.2 Books edited 3.3 Articles online4 Distinctions 5 External links 6 ReferencesLife[edit] Turner was born in Berkeley in California in 1947 but moved to British Columbia when she was five
[...More...]

"Nancy Turner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Constantino Manuel Torres
Constantino Manuel Torres, known as Manuel Torres, is an archaeologist and ethnobotanist specialising in the ethnobotany of pre-columbian South America and the Caribbean. In particular, he has shed much light on the Taíno use of Anadenanthera
Anadenanthera
snuff Cohoba, its paraphernalia and associated archaeology. Selected published works[edit]The Use of Anadenanthera
Anadenanthera
colubrina var. Cebil by Wichi (Mataco) Shamans of the Chaco Central, Argentina. Yearbook for ethnomedicine and the study of consciousness 5: 41-58, with David Repke as second author. Verläg für Wissenschaft und Bildung, Berlin, (1998). The role of cohoba in Taíno shamanism. Eleusis, n.s., no. 1: 38-50, Museo Civico di Rovereto, Trento, Italy, (1998). Exploring the San Pedro de Atacama/Tiahuanaco Relationship
[...More...]

"Constantino Manuel Torres" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Daniel Siebert (ethnobotanist)
Daniel J. Siebert is an ethnobotanist, pharmacognosist, and author who lives in Southern California.[1] Siebert has studied Salvia divinorum for over twenty years and was the first person to unequivocally identify (by human bioassays in 1993[2]) Salvinorin A as the primary psychoactive principal of Salvia divinorum.[1][3] In 1998, Siebert appeared in the documentary Sacred Weeds shown in the United Kingdom.[1] He has discussed Salvia divinorum on National Public Radio,[4] Fox News, CNN,[5] Telemundo and his comments have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, and The New York Times.[1] In 2002, Siebert wrote a letter to the United States Congress in which he objected to bill H.R. 5607 introduced by Rep. Joe Baca (D-California) which sought to place Salvia divinorum in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act.[6] References[edit]^ a b c d "Daniel J Siebert's Home Page"
[...More...]

"Daniel Siebert (ethnobotanist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Richard Evans Schultes
· Gold Medal - Linnean Society of London · Gold Medal - World Wildlife Fund · The Cross of BoyacaScientific careerFields EthnobotanyInstitutions Harvard UniversityDoctoral advisor Oakes AmesInfluences Oakes Ames, Richard SpruceInfluenced E.O. Wilson, Andrew Weil Daniel Goleman, Alan Ginsberg Alejo Carpentier, William S. Burroughs Wade Davis, Mark Plotkin, Terence McKenna, Timothy PlowmanAuthor abbrev. (botany) R.E.Schult. Richard Evans Schultes
Richard Evans Schultes
(SHULL-tees;[1] January 12, 1915 – April 10, 2001) was an American biologist. He may be considered the father of modern ethnobotany. He is known for his studies of the uses of plants by indigenous peoples, especially the indigenous peoples of the Americas. He worked on entheogenic or hallucinogenic plants, particularly in Mexico and the Amazon, involving lifelong collaborations with chemists
[...More...]

"Richard Evans Schultes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Giorgio Samorini
Giorgio Samorini (born in 1957, in Bologna, Italy) is a psychedelics researcher. He has published many essays and monographs regarding the use of psychoactive compounds and sacred plants. He was a frequent contributor to, and sometime editor of Eleusis the Journal of Psychoactive
Psychoactive
Plants & Compounds.Contents1 Bibliography1.1 Books 1.2 Publications2 External linksBibliography[edit] Books[edit]Animals and Psychedelics: The Natural World and the Instinct to Alter Consciousness (2000). Giorgio Samorini. Park Street Press. ISBN 0-89281-986-3. Samorini G., 1995, Gli Allucinogeni Nel Mito. Racconti sull'origine delle piante psicoattive. Nautilus Press, Torino. Samorini G., 1996, L'erba di Carlo Erba. Per una storia della canapa indiana in Italia (1845–1948), Nautilus, Torino. Samorini G., 2001, Funghi allucinogeni. Studi etnomicologici, Telesterion, Dozza BO. ISBN 88-87999-01-5. Samorini G., 2002, Animals and Drugs
[...More...]

"Giorgio Samorini" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Jan Salick
Jan Salick is an American botanist who researches the interaction between humans and plants (ethnobotany) and conservation biology. Her specialisms include alpine environments, climate change, indigenous peoples and traditional knowledge. She is a past-president of the Society for Economic Botany and holds their Distinguished Economic Botanist award. As of 2017, she is the Curator of Ethnobotany at the Missouri Botanical Garden.Contents1 Education 2 Career and research 3 Awards and honors 4 Selected publications 5 References 6 External linksEducation[edit] Salick gained her BA at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1973 and her MS from Duke University in 1977, both in biology. Her PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology was from Cornell University in 1983,[1][2] where she was a student of Richard B
[...More...]

"Jan Salick" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Timothy Plowman
Timothy Plowman (November 17, 1944 – January 7, 1989) was an ethnobotanist best known for his intensive work over the course of 15 years on the genus Erythroxylum
Erythroxylum
in general, and the cultivated coca species in particular. He collected more than 700 specimens from South America, housed in the collection of the Field Museum of Natural History.[1] Plowman joined the Field Museum of Natural History
Field Museum of Natural History
in 1978 where he became tenured in 1983 and was appointed Curator in 1988. He published more than 80 scientific papers (46 on Erythroxylum) and served as editor for several scientific journals. He is one of the main subjects of One River: Explorations and Discoveries in the Amazon Rain Forest by Wade Davis
[...More...]

"Timothy Plowman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Keewaydinoquay Peschel
Keewaydinoquay Pakawakuk Peschel was a scholar, ethnobotanist, herbalist, medicine woman, teacher and author. She was an Anishinaabeg Elder of the Crane Clan. She was born in Michigan around 1919 and spent time on Garden Island, a traditional Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
homeland.Contents1 Biography 2 Publications 3 See also 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Keewaydinoquay Pakawakuk Peschel (1919 – July 21,1999) was a scholar, ethnobotanist, herbalist, medicine woman, teacher and author. She was an Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
Elder of the Crane Clan. She was born in Michigan around 1919 and spent time on Garden Island, a traditional Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
homeland. According to her biography, she was born in a fishing boat en route to the hospital from the Manitou Islands, which capsized shortly thereafter, and her survival was interpreted as miraculous
[...More...]

"Keewaydinoquay Peschel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.