HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

List Of Environmental Issues
This is an alphabetical list of environmental issues, harmful aspects of human activity on the biophysical environment
[...More...]

"List Of Environmental Issues" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
("nanotech") is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology[1][2] referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers
[...More...]

"Nanotechnology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nutrient Pollution
Nutrient pollution, a form of water pollution, refers to contamination by excessive inputs of nutrients. It is a primary cause of eutrophication of surface waters, in which excess nutrients, usually nitrogen or phosphorus, stimulate algal growth. Sources of nutrient pollution include surface runoff from farm fields and pastures, discharges from septic tanks and feedlots, and emissions from combustion
[...More...]

"Nutrient Pollution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flooding
A flood is an overflow of water that submerges land that is usually dry.[1] The European Union
European Union
(EU) Floods Directive defines a flood as a covering by water of land not normally covered by water.[2] In the sense of "flowing water", the word may also be applied to the inflow of the tide. Floods are an area of study of the discipline hydrology and are of significant concern in agriculture, civil engineering and public health. Flooding may occur as an overflow of water from water bodies, such as a river, lake, or ocean, in which the water overtops or breaks levees, resulting in some of that water escaping its usual boundaries,[3] or it may occur due to an accumulation of rainwater on saturated ground in an areal flood
[...More...]

"Flooding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Landslide
A landslide, also known as a landslip[1] or mudslide,[citation needed] is a form of mass wasting that includes a wide range of ground movements, such as rockfalls, deep failure of slopes, and shallow debris flows. Landslides can occur underwater, called a submarine landslide, coastal and onshore environments
[...More...]

"Landslide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intensive Farming
Intensive farming
Intensive farming
involves various types of agriculture with higher levels of input and output per cubic unit of agricultural land area. It is characterized by a low fallow ratio, higher use of inputs such as capital and labour, and higher crop yields per cubic unit land area.[1][2] This contrasts with traditional agriculture, in which the inputs per unit land are lower. The term "intensive" involves various meanings, some of which refer to organic farming methods (such as biointensive agriculture and French intensive gardening), and others that refer to nonorganic and industrial methods. Intensive animal farming involves either large numbers of animals raised on limited land, usually concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), often referred to as factory farms,[1][3][4] or managed intensive rotational grazing (MIRG), which has both organic and non-organic types
[...More...]

"Intensive Farming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agricultural Subsidy
An agricultural subsidy is a governmental subsidy paid to farmers and agribusinesses to supplement their income, manage the supply of agricultural commodities, and influence the cost and supply of such commodities
[...More...]

"Agricultural Subsidy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intensive Animal Farming
Intensive animal farming
Intensive animal farming
or industrial livestock production, also known as factory farming, is a production approach towards farm animals in order to maximize production output, while minimizing production costs.[1] Intensive farming
[...More...]

"Intensive Animal Farming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intensive Crop Farming
Intensive crop farming
Intensive crop farming
is a modern form of intensive farming that refers to the industrialized production of crops. Intensive crop farming's methods include innovation in agricultural machinery, farming methods, genetic engineering technology, techniques for achieving economies of scale in production, the creation of new markets for consumption, patent protection of genetic information, and global trade. These methods are widespread in developed nations. The practice of industrial agriculture is a relatively recent development in the history of agriculture, and the result of scientific discoveries and technological advances. Innovations in agriculture beginning in the late 19th century generally parallel developments in mass production in other industries that characterized the latter part of the Industrial Revolution
[...More...]

"Intensive Crop Farming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Irrigation
Irrigation
Irrigation
is the application of controlled amounts of water to plants at needed intervals. Irrigation
Irrigation
helps grow agricultural crops, maintain landscapes, and revegetate disturbed soils in dry areas and during periods of less than average rainfall. Irrigation
Irrigation
also has other uses in crop production, including frost protection,[1] suppressing weed growth in grain fields[2] and preventing soil consolidation.[3] In contrast, agriculture that relies only on direct rainfall is referred to as rain-fed or dry land farming. Irrigation
Irrigation
systems are also used for cooling livestock, dust suppression, disposal of sewage, and in mining
[...More...]

"Irrigation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monoculture
Monoculture
Monoculture
is the agricultural practice of producing or growing a single crop, plant, or livestock species, variety, or breed in a field or farming system at a time. Polyculture, where more than one crop is grown in the same space at the same time, is the alternative to monoculture.[1] Monoculture
Monoculture
is widely used in both industrial farming and organic farming and has allowed increased efficiency in planting and harvest. Continuous monoculture, or monocropping, where the same species is grown year after year,[2] can lead to the quicker buildup of pests and diseases, and then rapid spread where a uniform crop is susceptible to a pathogen. The practice has been criticized for its environmental effects and for putting the food supply chain at risk
[...More...]

"Monoculture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Overgrazing
Overgrazing
Overgrazing
occurs when plants are exposed to intensive grazing for extended periods of time, or without sufficient recovery periods. It can be caused by either livestock in poorly managed agricultural applications, game reserves, or nature reserves. It can also be caused by immobile, travel restricted populations of native or non-native wild animals. Cows are the main things that causes overgrazing and "overgrazing". However, "overgrazing" is a controversial concept, based on equilibrium system theory. It reduces the usefulness, productivity, and biodiversity of the land and is one cause of desertification and erosion. Overgrazing
Overgrazing
is also seen as a cause of the spread of invasive species of non-native plants and of weeds
[...More...]

"Overgrazing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hydrology
Hydrology
Hydrology
is the scientific study of the movement, distribution, and quality of water on Earth
Earth
and other planets, including the water cycle, water resources and environmental watershed sustainability. A practitioner of hydrology is a hydrologist, working within the fields of earth or environmental science, physical geography, geology or civil and environmental engineering.[1] Using various analytical methods and scientific techniques, they collect and analyze data to help solve water related problems such as environmental preservation, natural disasters, and water management.[2] Hydrology
Hydrology
subdivides into surface water hydrology, groundwater hydrology (hydrogeology), and marine hydrology
[...More...]

"Hydrology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pesticide Drift
Pesticide
Pesticide
drift refers to the unintentional diffusion of pesticides and the potential negative effects of pesticide application, including off-target contamination due to spray drift as well as runoff from plants or soil.[1] This can lead to damage in human health, environmental contamination, and property damage.[1][2]Contents1 Types 2 Herbicide
[...More...]

"Pesticide Drift" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Plasticulture
The term plasticulture refers to the practice of using plastic materials in agricultural applications. The plastic materials themselves are often and broadly referred to as "ag plastics." Plasticulture ag plastics include soil fumigation film, irrigation drip tape/tubing, nursery pots and silage bags, but the term is most often used to describe all kinds of plastic plant/soil coverings. Such coverings range from plastic mulch film, row coverings, high and low tunnels (polytunnels), to plastic greenhouses. Polyethylene (PE) is the plastic film used by the majority of growers because of its affordability, flexibility and easy manufacturing.[1] It comes in a variety of thicknesses, such as a low density form (LDPE) as well as a linear low density form (LLDPE)
[...More...]

"Plasticulture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Slash And Burn
Slash-and-burn
Slash-and-burn
agriculture, or fire–fallow cultivation, is a farming method that involves the cutting and burning of plants in a forest or woodland to create a field called a swidden. (Preparing fields by deforestation is called assarting.) In subsistence agriculture, slash-and-burn typically uses little technology. It is often applied in shifting cultivation agriculture (such as in the Amazon rainforest) and in transhumance livestock herding.[1] Slash-and-burn
Slash-and-burn
is used by 200–500 million people worldwide.[2][3] In 2004 it was estimated that in Brazil
Brazil
alone, 500,000 small farmers each cleared an average of one hectare (2.47105 acres) of forest per year[4]. The technique is not scalable or sustainable for large human populations
[...More...]

"Slash And Burn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.