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List Of United States Coast Guard Cutters
The List of United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
Cutters is a listing of all cutters to have been commissioned by the United States Coast Guard during the history of that service
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United States Coast Guard
The United States
United States
Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces[6] and one of the country's seven uniformed services. The Coast Guard is a maritime, military, multi-mission service unique among the U.S. military branches for having a maritime law enforcement mission (with jurisdiction in both domestic and international waters) and a federal regulatory agency mission as part of its mission set. It operates under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security during peacetime, and can be transferred to the U.S. Department of the Navy by the U.S. President at any time, or by the U.S. Congress during times of war
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USCGC Humboldt (WAVP-372)
USS Humboldt (AVP-21) was a United States Navy Barnegat-class small seaplane tender in commission from 1941 to 1947 that served in the Atlantic during World War II. She was briefly reclassified as a miscellaneous auxiliary and redesignated AG-121 during 1945. After the war, she was in commission in the United States Coast Guard as the cutter USCGC Humboldt (WAVP-372), later WHEC-372, from 1949 to 1969,Contents1 Construction and commissioning 2 United States Navy service2.1 World War II 2.2 South Atlantic operations 2.3 North Atlantic operations 2.4 Return to South Atlantic service 2.5 Conversion to press information ship 2.6 Post-World War II and decommissioning3 United States Coast Guard service3.1 Service history4 Decommissioning and disposal 5 ReferencesConstruction and commissioning[edit] Humboldt (AVP-21) was laid down at the Boston Navy Yard, Massachusetts, on 6 September 1940. She was launched on 17 March 1941, sponsored by Mrs. William T
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USCGC Campbell (WPG-32)
USCGC Campbell (WPG-32) was a 327-foot (100 m) Secretary-class (also known as Treasury-class) United States Coast Guard ship built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1935-1936 and commissioned in 1936. Seven similar "combat cutters" were built and named for secretaries of the United States Treasury. Campbell was named for George Washington Campbell. She earned the title "Queen of the Seas" during a 46-year career, spanning World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam War.Contents1 Launch and early service 2 Wartime duties2.1 U-boat attack, February 1943 2.2 Luftwaffe attack, May 1944 2.3 Convoys escorted3 Later service3.1 Vietnam4 Sinking 5 Awards 6 References 7 External linksLaunch and early service[edit]Campbell in the New York Navy Yard, 1940George W. Campbell was launched on 3 June 1936 and sailed to her homeport of Stapleton, New York, under the command of Commander E.G. Rose, USCG, assigned to conduct search and rescue and law enforcement patrols
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USCGC Duane (WPG-33)
The USCGC Duane
USCGC Duane
(WPG-33/WAGC-6/WHEC-33) (earlier known as the USCGC William J. Duane) was a cutter in the United States
United States
Coast Guard. Her keel was laid on May 1, 1935 at the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was launched on June 3, 1936 as a search and rescue and law enforcement vessel. The "Treasury" class Coast Guard cutters (sometimes referred to as the "Secretary" or 327-foot class) were all named for former Secretaries of the Treasury Department
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USCGC Hamilton (WPG-34)
USCGC Alexander Hamilton (WPG-34) was a Treasury-class United States Coast Guard Cutter. She was named after the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton.[1] Sunk after an attack by a German U-boat in January 1942, the Hamilton was the U.S. Coast Guard's first loss of World War II.[2]Contents1 Design 2 History2.1 Sinking 2.2 Discovery of shipwreck3 Attaching memorial plaque on Alexander Hamilton 4 Awards 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDesign[edit] The design of the Alexander Hamilton was based on the U.S. Navy's Erie-class of gunboats.[1] This Treasury-class of U.S. Coast Guard cutters was sometimes referred to as the Secretary-class.[3] History[edit] The Hamilton was built at the New York Navy Yard for the U.S. Coast Guard.[1] Her keel was laid on September 11, 1935 and she was launched on January 6, 1937.[4] The U.S
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USCGC Ingham (WHEC-35)
USCGC Ingham (WHEC-35)
USCGC Ingham (WHEC-35)
is one of only two preserved Treasury-class United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
Cutters. Originally Samuel D. Ingham, she was the fourth cutter to be named for Treasury Secretary Samuel D. Ingham. She was the most decorated vessel in the Coast Guard fleet and was the only cutter to ever be awarded two Presidential Unit Citations.Contents1 History 1934–19881.1 Convoys escorted 1.2 Post-war service2 Museum Ship and Memorial 3 Awards 4 References 5 External linksHistory 1934–1988[edit] Ingham was built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. The Treasury Department awarded her contract on 30 January 1934. Her keel was laid on 1 May 1935 and she was launched on 3 June 1936 along with her sisters William J. Duane and Roger B. Taney. Ingham was christened by Ms. Katherine Ingham Brush on that date and the new cutter was formally commissioned on 12 September 1936.Ingham at U.S
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USCG Treasury Class Cutter
The Treasury-class cutter was a group of seven high endurance cutters launched by the United States Coast Guard between 1936 and 1937. The class were called the "Treasury class" because they were each named for former Secretaries of the Treasury. These ships were also collectively known as the "327's" as they were all 327 feet (100 m) in length.[1] The Treasury-class cutters proved highly adaptable, dependable, versatile and long-lived warships. Most served the United States for over 40 years, including with distinction and heroism through World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. In the words of naval historian John M. Waters, Jr., they were truly their nation's "maritime workhorses. The 327s battled through the 'Bloody Winter' of 1942-43 in the North Atlantic," with the ships heroically fighting off and destroying German U-boats, and rescuing survivors from torpedoed convoy ships
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USCGC Spencer (WPG-36)
USCGC Spencer (WPG-36) was a Treasury-class cutter of the United States Coast Guard that served during World War II.[1] She was named for U.S. Treasury Secretary John Canfield Spencer.Contents1 Early career and World War II1.1 Convoys escorted2 Post-war career 3 Retirement 4 Awards 5 ReferencesEarly career and World War II[edit] Commissioned in 1937, she was first used as a search and rescue unit off Alaska's fishing grounds. When the United States entered World War II the Coast Guard temporarily became part of the United States Navy. Spencer saw service in the Pacific War
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USCGC Taney (WHEC-37)
Taney may refer to: Taney Parish, a Church of Ireland community in south Dublin, Ireland Taney County, Missouri, United States USCGC Taney (WHEC-37), a United States Coast Guard cutter SS Roger B. Taney, a United States Liberty Ship Roger B. Taney
Roger B. Taney
(1777–1864), U.S
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Casco Class Cutter
The Casco class was a large class of United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
cutters in commission from the late 1940s through the late 1980s.[1] They saw service as weather reporting ships in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans until the early 1970s, and some saw combat service during the Vietnam War.Contents1 Design 2 Acquisition and modifications 3 Classification 4 Naming 5 Operations 6 Ships6.1 USCGC Casco (WAVP-370, WHEC-370) 6.2 USCGC Mackinac (WAVP-371, WHEC-371) 6.3 USCGC Humboldt (WAVP-372, WHEC-372) 6.4 USCGC Matagorda (WAVP-373, WHEC-373) 6.5 USCGC Absecon (WAVP-374, WHEC-374) 6.6 USCGC Chincoteague
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USCGC Casco (WAVP-370)
The third USS Casco (AVP-12) was a United States Navy
United States Navy
Barnegat-class small seaplane tender in commission from 1941 to 1947. She saw service in World War II. After her decommissioning, the U.S
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USCGC Matagorda (WAVP-373)
USS Matagorda (AVP-22/AG-122) (/ˈmætəˈɡɔːrdə/ ( listen)[1]) was a United States Navy Barnegat-class seaplane tender in commission from 1941 to 1946 that saw service in World War II
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USCGC Mackinac (WAVP-371)
The second USS Mackinac (AVP-13) was a United States Navy Barnegat-class small seaplane tender in commission from 1942 to 1947 that saw service during World War II. After the war, she was in commission in the United States Coast Guard from 1949 to 1967 as the cutter USCGC Mackinac (WAVP-371), later WHEC-371, the second ship of the Coast Guard or its predecessor, the United States Revenue Cutter Service, to bear the name.Contents1 Construction and commissioning 2 United States Navy service2.1 World War II2.1.1 First Pacific tour, 1942-1943 2.1.2 Second Pacific tour, 1943-1945 2.1.3 Third Pacific Tour 1945 2.1.4 Honors and awards2.2 Post-World War II3 United States Coast Guard service 4 Decommissioning and disposal 5 Notes 6 ReferencesConstruction and commissioning[edit] Mackinac was laid down on 29 May 1940 at Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, Washington. She was launched on 15 November 1941, sponsored by Mrs
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Treasury Class Cutter
The Treasury-class cutter was a group of seven high endurance cutters launched by the United States Coast Guard between 1936 and 1937. The class were called the "Treasury class" because they were each named for former Secretaries of the Treasury. These ships were also collectively known as the "327's" as they were all 327 feet (100 m) in length.[1] The Treasury-class cutters proved highly adaptable, dependable, versatile and long-lived warships. Most served the United States for over 40 years, including with distinction and heroism through World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. In the words of naval historian John M. Waters, Jr., they were truly their nation's "maritime workhorses. The 327s battled through the 'Bloody Winter' of 1942-43 in the North Atlantic," with the ships heroically fighting off and destroying German U-boats, and rescuing survivors from torpedoed convoy ships
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USCGC Absecon (WAVP-374)
The second USS Absecon (AVP-23) was a United States Navy Barnegat-class seaplane tender in commission from 1943 to 1947, converted during construction to serve as a catapult training ship during World War II. The ship was in commission in the United States Coast Guard as the cutter USCGC Absecon (WAVP-374), later WHEC-374, from 1949 to 1972. Transferred to South Vietnam in 1972, she served in the Republic of Vietnam Navy as the frigate RVNS Pham Ngu Lao (HQ-15) until she was captured by North Vietnam at the conclusion of the Vietnam War in 1975
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