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List Of U.S. Military Vehicles By Model Number
The following is a (partial) listing of vehicle model numbers or M-numbers assigned by the U.S. Army
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MBT-70
The MBT-70
MBT-70
(German: KPz 70) was an American– West German
West German
joint project to develop a new main battle tank during the 1960s. The MBT-70
MBT-70
was developed by the United States
United States
and West Germany
West Germany
in the context of the Cold War, intended to counter the new generation of Warsaw Pact
Warsaw Pact
tanks developed by the Soviet Union. The new tank was to be equipped with a number of advanced features such as newly developed "kneeling" hydropneumatic suspension and housing the entire crew in the large turret, and was armed with a 152mm XM150 gun/launcher, which could use conventional ammunition and the Shillelagh missile
Shillelagh missile
for long range combat.[3] By the late 1960s, the development of the MBT-70
MBT-70
was well over budget and affected by design issues
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M31 Tank Recovery Vehicle
The M3 Lee, officially Medium Tank, M3, was an American medium tank used during World War II. In Britain, the tank was called by two names based on the turret configuration and crew size. Tanks employing US pattern turrets were called the "Lee", named after Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Variants using British pattern turrets were known as "Grant", named after Union general Ulysses S. Grant. Design commenced in July 1940, and the first M3s were operational in late 1941.[2] The U.S. Army needed a medium tank armed with a 75mm gun and, coupled with the United Kingdom's immediate demand for 3,650 medium tanks,[3] the Lee began production by late 1940. The design was a compromise meant to produce a tank as soon as possible
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M32 Recovery Vehicle
The M4 Sherman tank was produced in several variants and it was also the basis for a number of related vehicles. In addition, Shermans have been modified by several nations from modernization upgrades to complete hull conversions for another task.Contents1 Overview 2 US variants2.1 US M4 sub-types 2.2 US Sherman-based vehicles 2.3 US Special Attachment variants3 Lend-Lease service 4 Post-war variants 5 Notes and references 6 External linksOverview[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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M46 Patton
The M46 was an American medium tank designed to replace the M26 Pershing and M4 Sherman. It was one of the U.S Army's principal medium tanks of the early Cold War, with models in service from 1949 to the mid-1950s. It was not widely used by U.S. Cold War
Cold War
allies, being exported only to Belgium, and only in small numbers to train crews on the upcoming M47 Patton. The M46 was the first tank to be named after General George S. Patton Jr., commander of the U.S. Third Army[3] during World War II
World War II
and one of the earliest American advocates for the use of tanks in battle.[4][5]Contents1 History 2 Combat service 3 Variants 4 Operators4.1 Former operators5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References7.1 Bibliography8 External linksHistory[edit] After World War II, most U.S. Army armored units were equipped with a mix of M4 Sherman
M4 Sherman
and M26 Pershing
M26 Pershing
tanks
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M47 Patton
The M47 Patton
M47 Patton
was an American main battle tank, a development of the M46 Patton
M46 Patton
mounting an updated turret, and was in turn further developed as the M48 Patton. It was the second American tank to be named after General George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. Third Army during World War II and one of the earliest American advocates of tanks in battle. The M47 was the U.S. Army's and Marine Corps' primary tank, intended to replace the M46 Patton
M46 Patton
and M4 Sherman
M4 Sherman
medium tanks.[note 1] The M47 was widely used by U.S. Cold War allies, both SEATO
SEATO
and NATO countries, and was the only Patton series tank that never saw combat while in US service. Although similar in appearance to the later M48s and M60s, these were completely new tank designs
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M48 Patton
Continental AVSI-1790-6 V12, air-cooled Twin-turbo
Twin-turbo
gasoline engine (early M48s) 810 SAE gross hp = 650 DIN hp (478 kW) Continental AVDS-1790-2 V12, air-cooled Twin-turbo
Twin-turbo
diesel engine 750 hp (560 kW)Power/weight 16.6 hp (12.4 kW)/tonneTransmission General Motors CD-850-4A or -4B, 2 ranges forward, 1 reverseSuspension Torsion bar suspensionFuel capacity 200 US gal (760 l; 170 imp gal)Operational rangeM48 and M48A1 113 km, M48A2 258 km, M48A3 463 km, M48A5 499 km (all on road)[4]Speed M48A5: 30 mph (48 km/h)The M48 Patton
M48 Patton
is a main battle tank (MBT) that was designed in the United States. It was the third tank[5] to be officially named after General George S. Patton, commander of the U.S
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M60 Patton
The M60 Patton
M60 Patton
is a main battle tank (MBT) introduced in December 1960.[6] With the United States
United States
Army's deactivation of their last (M103) heavy tank battalion in 1963, the M60 became the Army's primary tank[7] during the Cold War. Although developed from the M48 Patton, the M60 series was never officially classified as a Patton tank, but as a "product-improved descendant" of the Patton series.[8] In March 1959, the tank was officially standardized as the 105 mm Gun Full Tracked Combat Tank
Tank
M60. The M60 underwent many updates over its service life. The interior layout, based on the design of the M48, provided ample room for updates and improvements, extending the vehicle's service life for over four decades. It was widely used by the U.S
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M67 Flame Thrower Tank
The Flame Thrower Tank M67 (also known as M67 "Zippo",[1] nicknamed after a popular brand of cigarette lighter) is a postwar medium flame tank that was designed in the United States. It was designed in the years 1952–1954 on the M48 tank chassis, at the initiative of the US Marine Corps. During the production, which lasted from 1955 to (according to various sources) 1956 or 1959, 109 M67 tanks were produced for the Marine Corps and US Army. The M67 was primarily used for mop-up style operations. The method of firing munitions was called "rods of flames".[2] The swirling motion of the flames produced could reach round corners. The natural fear of being burned to death gave an added shock and awe factor to the M67.[3] Bibliography[edit]Hunnicutt., R. P. (1984). Patton: A History of American Medium Tank Volume I (1st ed.). Novato, CA: Presidio Press. ISBN 0-89141-230-1. Wikimedia Commons has media related to M67 tank.References[edit]^ Ringquist, John (Summer 2008)
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M75 (APC)
The M75 Armored Infantry Vehicle is an American armored personnel carrier that was produced between December 1952 and February 1954, and saw service in the Korean War. It was replaced in U.S. service by the smaller, cheaper, amphibious M59. The M75s were given as military aid to Belgium, where they were used until the early 1980s. 1,729 M75s were built before production was halted.Contents1 Development 2 Description 3 Specifications 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDevelopment[edit] Towards the end of World War II, a tracked, fully enclosed armored personnel carrier was developed under the designation M44 (T16) that was based on the M18 Hellcat. The M44 was extremely large (51,000 lb combat weight); carrying 24 infantry as well as a driver, bow gunner and vehicle commander
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M29 Weasel
The M29 Weasel
M29 Weasel
was a World War II
World War II
tracked vehicle, built by Studebaker, designed for operation in snow.[1]Contents1 Design and development 2 Gallery 3 Operational use3.1 U.S. Army 3.2 US Marine Corps 3.3 French Army 3.4 British Army 3.5 Canadian Army4 Variants 5 Specification 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksDesign and development[edit] The idea for the Weasel came from the work of British inventor Geoffrey Pyke
Geoffrey Pyke
in support of his proposals to attack Axis forces and industrial installations in Norway. Pyke's plan to hamper the German atomic weapons development became Project Plough
Project Plough
for which he proposed a fast light mechanised device that would transport small groups of commando troops of the 1st Special Service Force
1st Special Service Force
across snow
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M76 Otter
The M76 Otter
M76 Otter
was an amphibious cargo carrier used by the United States Marine Corps (USMC).Contents1 History 2 Preserved vehicles on display 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]M76 crossing paddy fieldsIt was designed and built by Pontiac Motor Division in the late 1940s and intended as a replacement for the M29 Weasel. It entered service with the USMC in the early 1950s and many saw action in the Vietnam War. It was replaced in USMC service by the M116 Husky. Preserved vehicles on display[edit] There are Otters on display at the following locations:Pacific War Museum, GuamReferences[edit]External links[edit]Video of M76 used as a firefighting vehicleThis United States Marine Corps
United States Marine Corps
article is a stub
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M88 Recovery Vehicle
•M88/M88A1: Continental (now L-3 Combat Propulsion Systems) AVDS-1790-2DR V12, air-cooled Twin-turbo
Twin-turbo
diesel engine •M88A2: Continental AVDS-1790-8CR, V12 air-cooled Twin-turbo
Twin-turbo
diesel engine M88/M88A1: 750 hp (560 kW) M88A2: 1,050 hp (780 kW)Transmission Twin Disc XT-1410-5A cross-drive (3 speed forward, 1 speed reverse)Suspension Torsion bar suspensionGround clearance 17 in (0.43 m)Operational rangeM88/M88A1: 450 km (280 mi) M88A2: 322 km (200 mi)Speed M88/M88A1: 42 km/h (26 mph) M88A2: 48 km/h (30 mph)The M88 Recovery Vehicle
M88 Recovery Vehicle
is one of the largest armored recovery vehicles (ARV) currently in use by United States
United States
Armed Forces
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M6 Gun Motor Carriage
The 37 mm Gun Motor Carriage M6, also known as M6 Fargo, and under the manufacturer (Dodge)'s designation WC55, was a modified Dodge WC52 light truck mounting a light anti-tank gun. It was used by the United States
United States
Army for infantry support and as a mobile anti-tank gun. It operated from late 1942 to January 1945 in the Mediterranean, European, and Pacific theaters of World War II. The M6 saw limited use during the war, and was poorly suited to modern warfare as it was unarmored and was armed with a too small caliber gun.Contents1 Description 2 Service 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The 37 mm Gun Motor Carriage (GMC) M6 was a modified 3/4-ton 4x4 Dodge WC52 truck with a rear-facing 37 mm M3 gun mounted in its bed (portee) and designated WC55
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M7 Howitzer Motor Carriage
The 105 mm Howitzer
Howitzer
Motor Carriage M7 was an American self-propelled artillery vehicle produced during World War II. It was given the official service name 105 mm Self Propelled Gun, Priest by the British Army, due to the pulpit-like machine gun ring, and following on from the Bishop and the contemporary Deacon self-propelled guns.Contents1 History1.1 Korean War 1.2 Israeli M7 Priests2 Variants 3 British service self-propelled guns with ecclesiastical names 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] U.S. Army observers realized that they would need a self-propelled artillery vehicle with sufficient firepower to support armored operations. Lessons learned with half-tracks (such as the T19 Howitzer Motor Carriage (HMC) with a 105mm howitzer on the M3 Half-track chassis) also showed that this vehicle would have to be armored and fully tracked
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