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List Of South Africans
This is a list of notable South Africans who are the subjects of articles.Contents1 Academics1.1 Academics 1.2 Medical and veterinary 1.3 Scientists 1.4 Theologians2 Writers2.1 Authors 2.2 Editors 2.3 Poets 2.4 Journalists3 Artists3.1 Performing artists3.1.1 Actors 3.1.2 Dancers 3.1.3 Playwrights and film directors 3.1.4 Singers, musicians and composers 3.1.5 Models, socialites and media personalities3.2 Visual Artists3.2.1 Cartoonists 3.2.2 Ceramists and collage artists 3.2.3 Painters 3.2.4 Photographers 3.2.5 Sculptors 3.2.6 Performance Artists 3.2.7 Architects4 Business 5 Legal, police and military 6 Political6.1 Activists and trade unionists 6.2 Apartheid
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Flag Of South Africa
The flag of South Africa
South Africa
was adopted on 27 April 1994, at the beginning of South Africa's 1994 general election, to replace the flag that had been used since 1928. The new national flag, designed by the then State Herald of South Africa
South Africa
Frederick Brownell, was chosen to represent the country's new democracy after the end of apartheid. The flag has horizontal bands of red (on the top) and blue (on the bottom), of equal width, separated by a central green band which splits into a horizontal "Y" shape, the arms of which end at the corners of the hoist side (and follow the flag's diagonals). The "Y" embraces a black isosceles triangle from which the arms are separated by narrow yellow bands; the red and blue bands are separated from the green band and its arms by narrow white stripes
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Thebe Medupe
Thebe Rodney Medupe (born 1973) is a South African astrophysicist and founding director of Astronomy Africa. He is perhaps best known for his work on the Cosmic Africa project that attempts to reconcile science and myth.[1][2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Cultural Astronomy Research2 Cosmic Africa 3 Notes 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and Education Thebe Medupe born 1973 grew up in a poor village outside Mmabatho, without electricity, lights or television, where he sat near the fire under the African sky, listening to the elders tell traditional Setswana stories. But his family sacrificed to send him to a fine, modern high school in Mmabatho, where modern western science and mathematics captured his imagination. Halley's comet inspired Thebe to build a crude telescope with a cardboard tube and lenses donated by a school lab technician, at the age of 13
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Phillip Clancey
Phillip Alexander Clancey (26 September 1917 – 18 July 2001) was a leading authority on the ornithology of South Africa.Contents1 Background and education 2 Military service 3 Expeditions 4 Museum posts 5 Books 6 Awards and honours 7 Collections 8 Later life 9 ReferencesBackground and education[edit] Phillip Clancey was born, brought up and educated in Glasgow, Scotland. He studied at the Glasgow School of Art where his artistic skills were developed. Military service[edit] Clancey served in the 51st (Highland) Division with the Allied forces in Sicily and Italy during World War II, narrowly escaping death and being deafened in one ear by an artillery explosion. Following his death in 2001, Clancy's military medals, together with his "Gill Memorial Medal" were auctioned by City Coins, Cape Town, in 2006, on behalf of the Clancey Estate. These medals, including the Gill Memorial Medal were purchased on the auction by David R
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Allan McLeod Cormack
Allan MacLeod Cormack (February 23, 1924 – May 7, 1998) was a South African American physicist who won the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (along with Godfrey Hounsfield) for his work on X-ray computed tomography (CT).Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Cormack was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. He attended Rondebosch Boys' High School in Cape Town, where he was active in the debating and tennis teams.[1] He received his B.Sc. in physics in 1944 from the University of Cape Town
University of Cape Town
and his M.Sc. in crystallography in 1945 from the same institution
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Clement Martyn Doke
Clement Martyn Doke (16 May 1893 in Bristol, United Kingdom – 24 February 1980 in East London, South Africa) was a South African linguist working mainly on African languages. Realizing that the grammatical structures of Bantu languages are quite different from those of European languages, he was one of the first African linguists of his time to abandon the Euro-centric approach to language description for a more locally grounded one. A most prolific writer, he published a string of grammars, several dictionaries, comparative work, and a history of Bantu linguistics.Contents1 Missionary in Lambaland 2 The Lamba language 3 University of the Witwatersrand 4 Selected publications 5 ReferencesMissionary in Lambaland[edit] The Doke family had been engaged in missionary activity for the Baptist Church for some generations. His father Reverend Joseph J. Doke left England and travelled to South Africa in 1882, where he met and married Agnes Biggs
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Mulalo Doyoyo
South Africa United StatesNationality South AfricanCitizenship South AfricaAlma materMassachusetts Institute of Technology Brown University University of Cape TownKnown forApplied mechanics Ultralight materials Green building Renewable energy BallisticsScientific careerFieldsEngineeringInstitutionsMassachusetts Institute of Technology Georgia Institute of TechnologyThesis Experimental studies of subsonic penetration in silica glasses and ceramicsMulalo Doyoyo (born 13 August 1970) is a South African engineer, inventor, and professor. Doyoyo is a researcher in applied mechanics, ultralight materials, green building, renewable energy, and other fields of engineering. He has lectured in different engineering disciplines including ocean engineering, civil and environmental engineering, and mechanical engineering
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Alexander Du Toit
Alexander Logie du Toit FRS[1] (/duːˈtɔɪ/ doo-TOY; 14 March 1878 – 25 February 1948) was a geologist from South Africa, and an early supporter of Alfred Wegener's theory of continental drift.[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Awards and honours 4 Significant publications 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Du Toit was born in Newlands, Cape Town
Newlands, Cape Town
in 1878 and educated at the Diocesan College
Diocesan College
in Rondebosch
Rondebosch
and the University of the Cape of Good Hope. Encouraged by his grandfather, Captain Alexander Logie, he graduated in 1899 in mining engineering at the Royal Technical College in Glasgow
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Robert Allen Dyer
Robert Allen Dyer
Robert Allen Dyer
(21 September 1900 Pietermaritzburg
Pietermaritzburg
– 26 October 1987 Johannesburg) was a South African botanist and taxonomist, working particularly on Amaryllidaceae
Amaryllidaceae
and succulent plants, contributing to and editing of Bothalia and Flowering Plants of Africa and holding the office of Director of the Botanical Research Institute in Pretoria
Pretoria
from 1944 to 1963.Contents1 Education and career 2 Major publications 3 Awards and fellowships 4 References 5 External linksEducation and career[edit] Attended Michaelhouse
Michaelhouse
and Natal University College 1919-1923, obtaining the degrees of M.Sc. in 1923 and D.Sc. in 1937. Appointed as assistant to Selmar Schonland
Selmar Schonland
in Grahamstown
Grahamstown
in 1925, as well as curator of the Albany Museum Herbarium
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Wendy Foden
Wendy Foden is a conservation biologist, best known for her work on climate change impacts on biodiversity.[1]Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksEducation[edit] While completing her master's degree at the University of Cape Town (2001), she discovered a latitudinal pattern of die-off of quiver trees (Aloidendron dichotomum) suggesting that climate change could be to blame. She received funding to further the study, working with Guy Midgley at the South African National Biodiversity
Biodiversity
Institute[2] in Cape Town. Foden spent much of 2001–2003 surveying Quiver Trees in Namibia and the arid regions of western South Africa and set up long term monitoring to track changes
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J. W. B. Gunning
Jan Willem Boudewijn Gunning (3 September 1860 in Hilversum, North Holland – 26 June 1913 in Pretoria), was a Dutch physician, who served as the director of both the Staatsmuseum and what was then known as the Pretoria Zoological Gardens (now the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa). Gunning was the second son of the famous Dutch theologian Johannes Hermanus Gunning (1829-1905) and Johanna Jacoba Gunning. He attended the University of Amsterdam, Leiden University and Jena University, qualifying as a doctor of medicine. In 1884 he emigrated to South Africa and started a practice in the Orange Free State. The same year, he met and married Susanna Neethling (26 April 1862 - 14 May 1889) on 10 November 1884. From the Free State, he moved to the Cape Colony and practised there until 1897 when he was appointed as first director of the Staatsmuseum (State Museum) in Pretoria, which later was renamed the Transvaal Museum
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David Lewis-Williams
James David Lewis-Williams
David Lewis-Williams
(born in 1934 in Cape Town) is a South African archaeologist.[1] He is best known for his research on southern African San (Bushmen) rock art, of which it can be said that he found a 'Rosetta Stone'.[2][3] He is the founder and previous director of the Rock Art Research Institute [3][4] and is currently professor emeritus of cognitive archaeology at the University of the Witwatersrand (WITS).[5] Lewis-Williams is recognised by the National Research Foundation (NRF) of
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Lucy Lloyd
Lucy Catherine Lloyd (7 November 1834 – 31 August 1914) was the creator, along with Wilhelm Bleek, of the 19th-century archive of ǀXam and !Kung texts.Contents1 Early life 2 Collaboration with Wilhelm Bleek 3 Return to Europe 4 Contributions and awards 5 Death 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Lucy Catherine Lloyd was born in Norbury in England on 7 November 1834. Her father, William H.C. Lloyd, Archdeacon of Durban, was the rector of Norbury and vicar of Ranton, two villages in western England in Staffordshire. He was also chaplain to the Earl of Lichfield, to whom he was related through his mother. Lucy Lloyd's mother was Lucy Anne Jeffreys, also a minister's daughter, who died in 1842 when Lucy was eight. Lucy Lloyd was the second of four daughters
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Hans Merensky
Hans Merensky (16 March 1871 in Botshabelo – 21 October 1952 on his farm Westfalia near Duiwelskloof) was a South African geologist, prospector, scientist, conservationist and philanthropist. He discovered the rich deposit of alluvial diamonds at Alexander Bay in Namaqualand, vast platinum and chrome reefs at Lydenburg, Rustenburg and Potgietersrus, which led to some of the largest platinum mines in the world, phosphates and copper at Phalaborwa in the Transvaal lowveld, gold in the Free State and the world’s biggest chrome deposit at Jagdlust near Pietersburg.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Hans Merensky was born on 16 March 1871 at Berlin Missionary Society station Botshabelo, near Middelburg in Transvaal, where his father, Alexander Merensky (1837–1918), a noted ethnographer and author, was the resident missionary
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Sydney Brenner
Sydney Brenner
Sydney Brenner
CH FRS FMedSci (born 13 January 1927) is a South African biologist and a 2002 Nobel prize in Physiology
Physiology
or Medicine laureate, shared with Bob Horvitz and John Sulston. Brenner made significant contributions to work on the genetic code, and other areas of molecular biology while working in the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Biology
in Cambridge, England
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Austin Roberts
Austin Roberts (3 January 1883 – 5 May 1948) was a South African zoologist. He is best known for his Birds of South Africa, first published in 1940. He also studied the mammalian fauna of the region: his work The mammals of South Africa
South Africa
was published posthumously in 1951. The 7th edition of Roberts' Birds of Southern Africa which appeared in 2005, is the standard work on the region's birds.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Literature 4 See also 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Roberts, son of a church minister Alfred Roberts and flower painter Marianne Fannin, was born in Pretoria
Pretoria
and grew up in Potchefstroom, South Africa. He gained much of his early knowledge of zoology from Thomas Ayres (1828–1913), one of South Africa's first amateur ornithologists. Roberts was employed by the Transvaal Museum
Transvaal Museum
from 1910 to 1946
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