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List Of Jain Temples
Jain temples
Jain temples
and tirtha (pilgrimage sites) are present throughout the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
, many of which were built several hundred years ago. Many of these temples are classified according to Jain sects . Idols of tirthankaras are present in these temples. Many Jain temples are found in other areas of the world. This article lists and documents prominent Jain temples
Jain temples
and Tirthas around the world
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Diwali
DIWALI or DEEPAVALI is the Hindu
Hindu
festival of lights celebrated every year in autumn in the northern hemisphere (spring in southern hemisphere)
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Arihant (Jainism)
ARIHANT (Hindi: अरिहंत , Jain Prakrit: अरिहन्त , Pali: अर्हत् , Arihanta) may refer to: * Arihant (Jainism) , in Jainism, a siddha who has not yet died * Arhat
Arhat
, in Buddhism, a person who has attained nirvaana, the perfected one* Arihant class submarine , a class
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Digambara
DIGAMBARA (/dɪˈɡʌmbərə/ ; "sky-clad") is one of the two major schools of Jainism
Jainism
, the other being Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
(white-clad). The word Digambara
Digambara
( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
) is a combination of two words: dig (directions) and ambara (sky), referring to those whose garments are of the element that fills the four quarters of space. Digambara
Digambara
monks do not wear any clothes. The monks carry picchi, a broom made up of fallen peacock feathers (for clearing the place before walking or sitting), kamandalu (a water container made of wood), and shastra (scripture). One of the most important scholar-monks of Digambara tradition was Kundakunda . He authored Prakrit
Prakrit
texts such as the Samayasāra and the Pravacanasāra
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Śvētāmbara
The ŚVēTāMBARA (/ʃwɛˈtʌmbərə/ ; Sanskrit : श्वेतांबर or श्वेतपट śvētapaṭa; also spelled Svetambar, Shvetambara, Shvetambar, Swetambar or Shwetambar) is one of the two main sects of Jainism
Jainism
, the other being the Digambara
Digambara
. Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
"white-clad" is a term describing its ascetics ' practice of wearing white clothes, which sets it apart from the Digambara
Digambara
"sky-clad" Jainas, whose ascetic practitioners go naked. Śvētāmbaras, unlike Digambaras, do not believe that ascetics must practice nudity. Śvētāmbaras also believe that women are able to obtain moksha . Śvētāmbaras maintain that the 19th Tirthankara , Māllīnātha , was a woman
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Jain Agamas
AGAMAS are texts of Jainism
Jainism
based on the discourses of the tirthankara . Agamas exist in Hinduism as well.Originally,'Agama' is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word. The discourse delivered in a samavasarana (divine preaching hall) is called Śhrut Jnāna and comprises eleven angas and fourteen purvas. The discourse is recorded by Ganadharas (chief disciples), and is composed of twelve angas (departments). It is generally represented by a tree with twelve branches. This forms the basis of the Jaina Agamas or canons. These are believed to have originated from Rishabhanatha
Rishabhanatha
, the first tirthankara. The earliest versions of Jain
Jain
Agamas known were composed in Ardhamagadhi Prakrit
Prakrit
language
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Tattvartha Sutra
TATTVARTHA SUTRA (also known as TATTVARTH-ADHIGAMA-SUTRA) is an ancient Jain text written by Acharya Umaswati , sometime between the 2nd- and 5th-century AD. It is the one of the Jain scripture written in the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language. Tattvartha Sutra is also known in Jainism
Jainism
as the Moksha-shastra (Scripture describing the path of liberation). The Tattvartha Sutra is regarded as one of the earliest, most authoritative books on Jainism, and the only text authoritative in both the Digambara
Digambara
and Śvētāmbara
Śvētāmbara
sects (prior to the Saman Suttam ). Its importance in Jainism
Jainism
is comparable with that of the Brahma Sutras and YogaSutras of Patanjali in Hinduism
Hinduism

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Yashovijaya
YASHOVIJAYA ( IAST
IAST
: Yaśovijaya, 1624–1688), a seventeenth-century Jain philosopher-monk , was a notable Indian philosopher and logician. He was a thinker, prolific writer and commentator who had a strong and lasting influence on Jainism
Jainism
. He was a disciple of Muni Nayavijaya in the lineage of Jain monk Hiravijaya (belonging to the Tapa Gaccha tradition of Svetambara Jains) who influenced the Mughal Emperor Akbar to give up eating meat . He is also known as YASHOVIJAYJI with honorifics like MAHOPADHYAYA or UPADHYAYA or GANI
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Haribhadra
HARIBHADRA SURI was a Svetambara mendicant Jain leader and author. There are multiple contradictory dates assigned to his birth. According to tradition, he lived c. 459–529 CE. However, in 1919, a Jain monk named Jinavijayi pointed out that given his familiarity with Dharmakirti , a more likely choice would be sometime after 650. In his writings, Haribhadra
Haribhadra
identifies himself as a student of Jinabhadra and Jinadatta of the Vidyadhara Kula. There are several, somewhat contradictory, accounts of his life. He wrote several books on Yoga, such as the Yogadṛṣṭisamuccaya and on comparative religion, outlining and analyzing the theories of Hindus, Buddhists and Jains
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Ganadhara
In Jainism
Jainism
, the term GANADHARA is used to refer the chief disciple of a Tirthankara . In samavasarana , the Tīrthankara sat on a throne without touching it (about two inches above it). Around, the Tīrthankara sits the Ganadharas. According to Digambara
Digambara
tradition, only a disciple of exceptional brilliance and accomplishment (riddhi) is able to fully assimilate, without doubt, delusion, or misapprehension, the anekanta teachings of a Tirthankara. The presence of such a disciple is mandatory in the samavasarana before Tirthankara delivers his sermons. Ganadhara
Ganadhara
interpret and mediate to other people the divine sound (divyadhwani) which the Jains claim emanates from Tirthankara 's body when he preaches
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Kundakunda
ACHARYA KUNDAKUNDA is a revered Digambara
Digambara
Jain monk and philosopher. He authored many Jain texts such as: Samayasara , Niyamasara , Pancastikayasara , Pravachanasara , Atthapahuda and Barasanuvekkha. He occupies the highest place in the tradition of the Jain acharyas . Modern scholarship has found it difficult to locate him chronologically, with a possible low date in the 2nd-3rd centuries CE and a late date in 8th century. CONTENTS * 1 Names * 2 Biography * 3 Thought * 4 Works * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links NAMESHis proper name was Padmanandin, he is popularly referred to as Kundakunda
Kundakunda
possibly because the modern village of Kondakunde in Anantapur district of Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
might represent his native home. A.N
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Siddhasena
SIDDHASēNA DIVāKARA (Magadhi Prakrit
Prakrit
: सिद्दसेन दिवाकर) was an Digambara
Digambara
monk in the fifth century CE who wrote works on Jain philosophy and epistemology. He was like the illuminating lamp of the Jain order and therefore came to be known as Divākara "Lamp-Maker". He is credited with the authorship of many books, most of which are not available. Sanmatitarka (‘The Logic of the True Doctrine’) is the first major Jain work on logic written in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
. CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Thought * 3 Works * 4 Notes * 5 References LIFE Siddhasena
Siddhasena
Divakara is said to have lived from 500 CE to 610 CE. He was a Brahmin by birth and a scholar. He was initiated by Acharya Vruddhavadi
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Samantabhadra (Jain Monk)
SAMANTABHADRA was a Digambara
Digambara
acharya (head of the monastic order) who lived about the later part of the second century CE He was a proponent of the Jaina doctrine of Anekantavada . The Ratnakaranda śrāvakācāra is the most popular work of Samantabhadra. Samantabhadra lived after Umaswami but before Pujyapada . CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Thought * 3 Works * 4 Praise * 5 References * 6 Sources LIFESamantabhadra is said to have lived from 150 CE to 250 CE. He was from southern India during the time of Chola dynasty
Chola dynasty
. He was a poet, logician, eulogist and an accomplished linguist. He is credited with spreading Jainism
Jainism
in southern India. Samantabhadra, in his early stage of asceticism, was attacked with a disease known as bhasmaka (the condition of insatiable hunger)
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Dravyasamgraha
DRAVYASAṃGRAHA (Devnagari: द्रव्यसंग्रह) (Compendium of substances) is a 10th-century Jain text in Jain Sauraseni Prakrit
Prakrit
by Acharya Nemicandra belonging to the Digambara Jain
Jain
tradition. It is a composition of 58 gathas (verses) giving an exposition of the six dravyas (substances) that characterize the Jain view of the world: sentient (jīva ), non-sentient (pudgala ), principle of motion (dharma ), principle of rest (adharma), space (ākāśa) and time (kāla ). It is one of the most important Jain works and has gained widespread popularity. Dravyasaṃgraha has played an important role in Jain
Jain
education and is often memorized because of its comprehensiveness as well as brevity
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History Of Jainism
HISTORY OF JAINISM concerns a religion founded in Ancient India
Ancient India
. Jains trace their history through twenty-four tirthankara and revere Rishabhanatha
Rishabhanatha
as the first tirthankara (in the present time-cycle). The last two tirthankara, the 23rd tirthankara Parshvanatha
Parshvanatha
(c. 872 – c. 772 BCE) and the 24th tirthankara Mahavira (c. 599 – c. 527 BCE) are considered historical figures, though many historians date them both about a century later because the Mahavira is widely accepted as a contemporary of the Buddha
Buddha
, and significantly more historical evidence is available for the Buddha. According to Jain texts, the 22nd Tirthankara arsth-Nami lived about 85,000 years ago and was the cousin of Hindu god Krishna
Krishna
. Jains consider their religion to be eternal
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Mahavir Jayanti
MAHAVIR JANMA KALYANAK, also known as MAHAVIR JAYANTI, is the most important religious festival for Jains . It celebrates the birth of Mahavira , twenty-fourth and the last Tirthankara (Teaching God) of Avasarpiṇī . On the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
, the holiday occurs either in March or April. CONTENTS * 1 Birth * 2 Birth legend * 3 Celebrations * 3.1 Ahimsa run and rallies * 4 Greetings * 5 See also * 6 References * 6.1 Notes * 6.2 Citations * 6.3 Sources * 7 External links BIRTHMost modern historians consider Vasokund as Mahavira 's birthplace. According to Jain
Jain
texts, Mahavira was born on the thirteenth day of the bright half of the moon in the month of Chaitra in the year 599 BCE ( Chaitra Sud 13)
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