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List Of Irish-language Given Names
This list of Irish-language given names shows Irish language
Irish language
(as Gaeilge) given names and Anglicized or Latinized forms, with English equivalents. Some English-language names derive directly from the Irish — Kathleen = Caitlín, Owen = Eoghan. Some Irish-language names derive or are adapted from the English-language — Éamon = Edmund or Edward. Some Irish-language names have direct English equivalents deriving from a common name in Ireland. Máire, Maura and Mary derive from the French "Marie" and the Hebrew "Mary". " Maureen = Mairín, a diminutive. Some Irish names have [apparent] equivalents in other languages but are not etymologically related. Áine (meaning "brightness" or "radiance") is accepted as Anna and Anne (Áine was the name of an Irish Celtic Goddess)
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Derbforgaill
Dearbhfhorghaill (older spelling: Derbforgaill) (1108–1193), anglicized as Derval, was a daughter of Murchad Ua Maeleachlainn, king of Meath, and of his wife Mor (died 1137), daughter of Muirchertach Ua Briain
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Íde
Íde is a feminine given name of ancient Irish origin. Prior to the Irish spelling reform, the name was spelt Íte. St. Íde has her feast day on the 15th of January. Míde is an early pet-form of the name. The name has been anglicised as Ita, Ida or Meeda.[1] References[edit]^ Ó Corráin, Donnchadh; Maguire, Fidelma. Irish Names. The Lilliput Press
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Emer
Emer
Emer
[ˈẽβ̃əɾ], in Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
Eimhir, in modern Irish Eimhear or Éimhear (Eimer, Eimear and Éimear are also used as modern versions),[1][2] daughter of Forgall Monach, is the wife of the hero Cú Chulainn
Cú Chulainn
in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.Contents1 Legend1.1 Tochmarc Emire
Tochmarc Emire
"The Wooing of Emer" 1.2 Emer's only jealousy 1.3 Other stories2 Cultural references2.1 Literature 2.2 Other references3 Notes 4 References4.1 Primary sources5 External linksLegend[edit] Tochmarc Emire
Tochmarc Emire
"The Wooing of Emer"[edit] Main article: Tochmarc Emire The Ulstermen searched all over Ireland
Ireland
for a suitable wife for Cú Chulainn, but he would have none but Emer
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Edna (given Name)
Edna (Hebrew: עֶדְנָה‎) is a female given name originating from several languages. In Hebrew, it means "pleasure".[1] Various women named Edna are referenced in the Old Testament apocryphal books Jubilees (where the wives of Enoch, Methuselah, and Terah are all so named) and Tobit. The name Edna may also be an Anglicized form of the Irish and Scottish name Eithne,[2] meaning "kernel" in Gaelic.[3] This was a very popular girl's name in the United States in the early 20th century, but has since become unfashionable. It is also a very rare surname. Edna, as derived from Hebrew, is closely related etymologically to the name Eden. People with the given name Edna[edit]Edna Best (1900–1974), British actress Edna Doré (born 1922), British actress Edna Eicke (1919–1979), American illustrator Edna Ferber (1885–1968), American novelist Edna Iturralde, Ecuadorian author Edna F
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Findabair
Findabair or Finnabair (modern Irish Fionnabhair [ˈfʲɪn̪ˠəuɾʲ]) was a daughter of Ailill and Queen Medb
Medb
of Connacht
Connacht
in Irish mythology.[1] The meaning of the name is "white phantom" (etymologically cognate with Gwenhwyfar, the original Welsh form of Guinevere).[2][3][4] The Dindsenchas also mention a Findabair who is the daughter of Lugaid Laigde.[5] Though not considered a main character in the Táin, Finnabair occupies a crucial role in the epic. During the war of the Táin, her hand is offered to a succession of warriors in exchange for their sparring with Cú Chulainn
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Ailill Mac Máta
Ailill (Ailell, Oilioll) a popular male given name in medieval Ireland meaning "elf". It can be pronounced either as "AWL-yil" or "Ah-EEL", dependent on spelling and may refer to: Ailill mac Máta, legendary king of Connacht and husband of queen Medb Ailill mac Slanuill, legendary High King of Ireland of the 12th century BC Ailill Finn, legendary High King of the 8th century BC Ailill Caisfhiaclach, legendary High King of the 5th century BC Ailill mac Echach Mugmedóin, half-brother of Niall of the Nine Hostages (5th century AD) Ailill Molt, High King of the 5th century AD Ailill Inbanda (died c. 549), King of Connacht Saint Ailill the First b. c.460 – d.13 January 526, Bishop of Armagh, Ireland from 513 to 13 January 526 Ailill the Second
Ailill the Second
b. c.480 - d
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Dorothy (given Name)
Dorothy is a female given name. It comes from Greek Δωροθέα (Dōrothéa) meaning "God's Gift", from δῶρον (dōron), "gift"[1] + θεός (theós), "god".[2] Although much less common, there are also male equivalents in English such as "Dorie" from the Greek masculine Δωρόθεος (Dōrótheos). Also, the given names Theodore and Theodora are derived from the same two Greek root words as Dorothy, albeit reversed in order. The name is variously abbreviated to "Dot", "Dotty" and "Doll". Dorothy was a less common variant of Dorothea, until it became one of the top 10 most popular girl's names in the United States between 1904 and 1940. The name remained among the top 100 most popular names for American girls until 1961. It then declined in popularity and was last ranked among the top 1,000 most popular names for American newborn girls in 2006, when it was ranked in 986th position. There were 235 newborn American girls given the name in 2010
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Medb
Medb
Medb
(pronounced [mɛðv])—later forms Meadhbh ([mɛɣv]) and Méabh ([mʲeːv])—is queen of Connacht
Connacht
in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. Her husband in the core stories of the cycle is Ailill mac Máta, although she had several husbands before him who were also kings of Connacht. She rules from Cruachan (now Rathcroghan, County Roscommon). She is the enemy (and former wife) of Conchobar mac Nessa, king of Ulster, and is best known for starting the Táin Bó Cúailnge ("The Cattle Raid of Cooley") to steal Ulster's prize stud bull
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Dymphna
Saint Dymphna
Dymphna
(also: Dympna, Dimpna, Dymphnart, Damnat, from Gaelic Damh=stag and ait=little, i.e. "fawn".) (pronounced "Dimf-nah")[1] is a Catholic and Orthodox saint.[2][3] According to tradition, she lived in the 7th century and was the daughter of a pagan Irish king and his Christian wife. She was murdered by her father. The story of Dymphna
Dymphna
was first recorded in the 13th century by a canon of the Church of St. Aubert at Cambrai, France
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Claudia (other)
Claudia is the female form of Claudius and may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Ancient Romans 1.2 Modern people2 Other 3 See alsoPeople[edit] Ancient Romans[edit]Any woman from the Roman gens Claudia Claudia (Roman legend), legendary Vestal Virgin Claudia Augusta (63–63 AD), infant daughter of Nero by his second wife Claudia Capitolina, princess of Commagene originally from Roman Egypt Julia (daughter of Drusus the Younger) (5–43 AD), Claudia Julia, granddaughter of Tiberius Claudia Marcella, either of two nieces of Augustus Claudia Octavia (died 62 AD), first wife of Nero Claudia Procula, wife of Pontius Pilate Claudia Pulchra (other), any of several women including a daughter of Publius Clodius Pulcher and a great-niece of Augustus Claudia Rufina, a woman of British descent who lived in Rome c
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Cliodhna
In Irish mythology, Clíodhna (Clídna, Clionadh, Clíodna, Clíona, transliterated to Kleena[dubious – discuss] in English) is a Queen of the Banshees of the Tuatha Dé Danann
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Edwina (given Name)
The name Edwina is the female version of the male name Edwin, which derives from Old English
Old English
and means "rich friend." Edwin
Edwin
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Gráinne (given Name)
Gráinne is a feminine given name in the Irish language. The name is of an uncertain origin, although it is possible that it may be connected with the word "Ghrian", meaning "the Sun". In Irish legend, Deorghrianne (a Tear of the Sun), is the daughter of Fiachna, Son of Betach
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Brónach
Saint Brónach
Brónach
(sometimes anglicised to Bronagh) was a 6th-century holy woman from Ireland, the reputed founder and patron saint of Cell Brónche ("church of Brónach"), now Kilbroney, in County Down, Northern Ireland.[1]Contents1 Life 2 References2.1 Primary sources3 Further reading 4 External linksLife[edit] A disciple of Saint Patrick, she built a refuge for sailors who were shipwrecked in Carlingford Lough. The ringing of Bronach’s bell warned of a rising storm on the dangerous waters of the Lough. About 150 years ago a storm brought down a large old oak tree in the Kilbroney churchyard, and in its branches was found a 10th-century bell
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Blanche (given Name)
Blanche is a feminine given name. It means "white" in French, derived from the Late Latin
Late Latin
word "blancus".[1][2]Contents1 People1.1 French royalty 1.2 Navarrese royalty 1.3 Other nobility 1.4 Other people 1.5 Fictional characters2 See also 3 ReferencesPeople[edit] French royalty[edit] Blanche of Castile
Blanche of Castile
(1188–1252), Queen of France, granddaughter of Blanca of Navarre (daughter of Garcia VI) Blanche of Navarre, Queen of France
Blanche of Navarre, Queen of France
(Blanche d'Évreux, 1330–1398) Blanche of France, Infanta of Castile
Blanche of France, Infanta of Castile
(1253–1323), daughter of King Louis IX of France, wife of Fernando, the eldest son of Alfonso X of Castile Blanche of France, Duchess of Austria
Blanche of France, Duchess of Austria
(c
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