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List Of Icelandic Monarchs
This is a list of rulers of Iceland, ruling from 1262 to 1944. Iceland
Iceland
was settled in the late 9th and early 10th centuries, principally by people of Norwegian and other Scandinavian origin. In 930, the ruling chiefs established a republican constitution and an assembly called the Althing
Althing
- the oldest parliament in the world. Iceland
Iceland
remained independent until 1262, when it entered into a treaty which established a union with the Norwegian monarchy. In the late 14th century Norway
Norway
and Denmark
Denmark
entered into a union
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History Of Iceland
The recorded history of Iceland
Iceland
began with the settlement by Viking explorers and their slaves from the east, particularly Norway
Norway
and the British Isles, in the late ninth century. Iceland
Iceland
was still uninhabited long after the rest of Western Europe
Western Europe
had been settled. Recorded settlement has conventionally been dated back to 874, although archaeological evidence indicates Gaelic monks from Ireland had settled Iceland
Iceland
before that date. The land was settled quickly, mainly by Norwegians who may have been fleeing conflict or seeking new land to farm. By 930, the chieftains had established a form of governance, the Althing, making it one of the world's oldest parliaments. Towards the end of the tenth century, Christianity came to Iceland
Iceland
through the influence of the Norwegian king Olaf Tryggvason
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Norway
Indigenous status:Sámi[3] Minority status:[4]Jewish Traveller Forest Finn Romani Kven Demonym(s)NorwegianGovernmentUnitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• Monarch Harald V• Prime Minister Erna Solberg•  President of the Storting
President of the Storting
Tone W
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Dietrich, Count Of Oldenburg
Dietrich or Theoderic of Oldenburg (c. 1398 – 14 February 1440) was a feudal lord in Northern Germany, holding the counties of Delmenhorst and Oldenburg. He was called "Fortunatus", as he was able to secure Delmenhorst
Delmenhorst
for his branch of the Oldenburgs. Dietrich was the father of Christian I of Denmark, who would go on to start the modern day dynasty of the Danish throne.Contents1 Lineage 2 Marriages and children 3 Male line of descendants 4 Ancestry 5 Notes 6 ReferencesLineage[edit] Dietrich of Oldenburg was the son of Christian V of Oldenburg, who became the Count circa 1398 and died in 1423. His wife, the Countess Agnes of Honstein, was born circa 1410 and died in 1460. His grandfather, Conrad I of Oldenburg, who died circa 1368, left his lands divided between Dietrich's father and uncle, Conrad II. Dietrich’s father, Christian V, managed to gain the upper hand when Conrad II's son Maurice II died in 1420
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House Of Bonde
Bonde
Bonde
is a very old Swedish noble family. Prominent members and others bearing the name include: Tord Bonde (c
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Charles I Of Norway
Charles VIII of Sweden
Sweden
(1408 Uppsala
Uppsala
- 1470 Stockholm, in reality Charles II), Charles I of Norway, also Carl (Swedish: Karl Knutsson), was king of Sweden
Sweden
(1448–1457, 1464–1465 and from 1467 to his death in 1470) and king of Norway
Norway
(1449–1450).Contents1 Regnal name 2 Early life 3 Growing influence 4 King of Sweden 5 Later reigns 6 Family 7 Legacy 8 ReferencesRegnal name[edit] Charles was the second Swedish king by the name of Charles (Karl). Charles VII is a posthumous invention, counting backwards from Charles IX (r. 1604–1611) who adopted his numeral according to a fictitious history of Sweden
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John, Count Palatine Of Neumarkt
John (Johann von Pfalz-Neumarkt; 1383 – 14 March 1443) was the Count Palatine of Neumarkt from 1410 to his death. The son of Rupert III of the Palatinate, he married Catherine of Pomerania
Catherine of Pomerania
in 1407. He is mainly known for his crushing victory against the Hussites
Hussites
at the Battle of Hiltersried in 1433.Christopher, his son, was king of the Kalmar Union.[1]References[edit]^ "Ancestry of Christopher III of Denmark"
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Wartislaw VII, Duke Of Pomerania
Wartislaw VII (Polish: Warcisław VII) (*1363/1365 – † 1394/1395)[1] was one of the Dukes of Pomerania.Contents1 Life 2 Ancestors 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] He was the son of Bogislaw V, brother of Casimir IV and Bogislaw VIII. He married Maria of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (daughter of Henry III, Duke of Mecklenburg) and was the father of Eric of Pomerania
Eric of Pomerania
and Catherine of Pomerania. In 1377 he became Duke of Pomerania in Pomerania-Stolp; at times he was its coruler with his brother, Bogislaw VIII. He maneuvered between two local powers, the Teutonic Knights
Teutonic Knights
and the Kingdom of Poland. In 1386 he allied himself with the Knights; but in 1390, by the Treaty of Pyzdry, he allied himself with Poland, and pledged vassalage to the king of Poland, Władysław Jagiełło
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House Of Estridsen
A house is a building that functions as a home. They can range from simple dwellings such as rudimentary huts of nomadic tribes and the improvised shacks in shantytowns to complex, fixed structures of wood, brick, concrete or other materials containing plumbing, ventilation, and electrical systems.[1][2] Houses use a range of different roofing systems to keep precipitation such as rain from getting into the dwelling space. Houses may have doors or locks to secure the dwelling space and protect its inhabitants and contents from burglars or other trespassers. Most conventional modern houses in Western cultures will contain one or more bedrooms and bathrooms, a kitchen or cooking area, and a living room. A house may have a separate dining room, or the eating area may be integrated into another room. Some large houses in North America have a recreation room
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Haakon VI Of Norway
Haakon VI of Norway
Norway
(Norwegian: Håkon, Swedish: Håkan; 1340–1380), also known as Håkan Magnusson, was King of Norway
King of Norway
from 1343 until his death and King of Sweden
King of Sweden
between 1362 and 1364. He is sometimes known as Haakon Magnusson the Younger to distinguish him from his great-grandfather, Haakon V (reigned 1299–1319).[1] Haakon was the younger son of Magnus Eriksson, king of both Norway
Norway
and Sweden. His older brother Eric was meant to succeed their father on the throne of Sweden, while Haakon was made king of Norway
Norway
in his father's lifetime. Magnus greatly favored Haakon over Eric, leading to the latter's rebellion and seizure of Southern Sweden. Eric died in 1359, and Haakon became co-ruler of Sweden
Sweden
with his father three years later
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Coat Of Arms Of Iceland
The coat of arms of Iceland
Iceland
displays a silver-edged, red cross on blue shield (blazoned: Azure, on a cross argent a cross gules). This alludes to the design of the flag of Iceland. The supporters are the four protectors of Iceland
Iceland
(landvættir) standing on a pahoehoe lava block.[citation needed] The bull (Griðungur) is the protector of northwestern Iceland, the eagle or griffin (Gammur) protects northeastern Iceland, the dragon (Dreki) protects the southeastern part, and the rock-giant (Bergrisi) is the protector of southwestern Iceland. Great respect was given to these creatures of Iceland, so much that there was a law during the time of the Vikings
Vikings
that no ship should bear grimacing symbols (most often dragonheads on the bow of the ship) when approaching Iceland
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Haakon V Of Norway
Haakon V Magnusson (10 April 1270 – 8 May 1319) (Old Norse: Hákon Magnússon; Norwegian: Håkon Magnusson) was king of Norway
Norway
from 1299 until 1319.Contents1 Biography 2 Ancestry 3 Gallery 4 References 5 Other sourcesBiography[edit]Head from the Nidaros Cathedral, considered to possibly represent an older Haakon.[2]Burial site of Håkon V in OsloA sculpture believed to be of King Haakon V Magnusson as Duke of Oslo, Oppland, Ryfylke, the Faroe Islands, and Shetland.[3]Haakon was the younger surviving son of Magnus the Lawmender, King of Norway, and his wife Ingeborg of Denmark. Through his mother, he was a descendant of Eric IV, king of Denmark. In 1273, his elder brother, Eirik, was named junior king under the reign of their father, King Magnus
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Eric II Of Norway
Eric Magnusson (1268 – 15 July 1299) (Old Norse: Eiríkr Magnússon; Norwegian: Eirik Magnusson) was the King of Norway
Norway
from 1280 until 1299.Contents1 Background 2 Reign 3 Ancestry 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] Eirik was the eldest surviving son of King Magnus the Lawmender of Norway, and his wife Ingeborg Eriksdatter, daughter of King Eric IV of Denmark. In 1273, when he was 5 years old, he was given the title of king, alongside his father, who planned to hold a coronation for Eirik as his subordinate co-ruler in the summer of 1280. However, King Magnus died before this could be arranged, and Eirik became sole king and was crowned as such in Bergen
Bergen
in the summer of 1280. During his minority, the kingdom was ruled by a royal council consisting of prominent barons and probably also his mother, the dowager queen Ingeborg
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Magnus VI Of Norway
Magnus Haakonsson (Old Norse: Magnús Hákonarson, Norwegian: Magnus Håkonsson; 1 May 1238 – 9 May 1280) was King of Norway
Norway
(as Magnus VI) from 1263 to 1280 (junior king from 1257).[1] One of his greatest achievements was the modernisation and nationalisation of the Norwegian law-code, after which he is known as Magnus the Law-mender (Old Norse: Magnús lagabœtir, Norwegian: Magnus Lagabøte). He was the first Norwegian monarch known to have used an ordinal number, although originally counting himself as "IV".Contents1 Early life 2 Reign2.1 Foreign policy 2.2 Internal policies3 Death and aftermath 4 Ancestry 5 References 6 Other sourcesEarly life[edit] He was the youngest son of King Håkon Håkonsson and his wife Margaret Skuladotter. He was born in Tunsberg and was baptised in May 1238. He spent most of his upbringing in Bergen
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Haakon III Of Norway
Haakon Sverresson (Norwegian: Håkon Sverresson, Old Norse: Hákon Sverrisson) (1182 – 1 January 1204) was King of Norway
King of Norway
from 1202 to 1204.Contents1 Biography 2 Ancestry 3 References 4 BibliographyBiography[edit] Haakon was born as the second illegitimate son of the future King Sverre, then a Faroese adventurer. Historian P. A. Munch
P. A. Munch
suggested that Haakon III's mother could have been Astrid Roesdatter, daughter of Bishop Roe in the Faroe Islands, but this has not been supported by later historians.[1] The civil war period of Norwegian history lasted from 1130 to 1240. During this period there were several interlocked conflicts of varying scale and intensity
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Haakon IV Of Norway
Indigenous status:Sami[3]Minority status:[4]Jewish Traveller Forest Finn Romani KvenReligion LutheranDemonym Norwegian (Nordmann)Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• MonarchHarald V• Prime MinisterErna Solberg• President of the StortingTone W. Trøen• Chief JusticeToril Marie ØieLegislature StortingHistory• State established prior unification872•  Norwegian Empire
Norwegian Empire
(Greatest indep
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