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List Of Catholic Religious Institutes
The following is a list of current Catholic religious institutes. Most are Roman Catholic, however Eastern Catholic institutes are included. The list given here includes not only examples of pontifical-right institutes but also some that are only of diocesan right. It includes even some associations formed with a view to becoming religious institutes but not yet canonically erected even on the diocesan level. The list does not distinguish between institutes that historically would be classified either as "orders" or as "congregations". Institutes are listed alphabetically by their common names, not their official ones
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Bernardine Cistercians Of Esquermes
The Bernardine Cistercians of Esquermes are a small branch of the Cistercian Order. They follow the Rule of St Benedict, and co-operate with the apostolic mission of the Church through educational activities and hospitality. There are eight monasteries of nuns in six different countries, united by a central Government.Contents1 History1.1 The Cistercian Order 1.2 The French Revolution and the Bernardines of Esquermes 1.3 The First Hundred Years 1.4 Later Developments2 Spirituality2.1 Cistercian Spirituality and Vows 2.2 Prayer3 Structures3.1 Government 3.2 Formation4 Current monasteries 5 Activities 6 Oblates and Lay Associates 7 References 8 Sources and external linksHistory[edit] The Cistercian Order[edit]Ss Robert, Alberic and Stephen Harding, founders of CiteauxIn the 11th century, three Benedictine monks, Ss Robert of Molesme, Alberic and Stephen Harding, sought to follow the Rule of St. Benedict in all its fulness
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Neophytos Nasri
Neophytos Nasri (1670–1731) was bishop of Saidnaya of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church and took a preeminent part in the 1724 split of the Melkite Church. Life[edit] Nasrallah Néophytos Nasri was born in Aleppo in 1670. He entered young a monk in the Balamand Monastery and in 1696 he was one of the founders of the Basilian Chouerite Order. He served also as a preached in Amid. In 1722 he was appointed bishop of Saidnaya, and consecrated Bishop in the same year by Patriarch Athanasius III Dabbas.[1] On October 1, 1724[2] he consecrated Cyril VI Tanas as bishop and Patriarch of the Melkite Church,[3] so originating the split of the Melkite Church. After persecutions from the Orthodox party, he had to leave Saidnaya and in 1730 he moved to Rome, where he died on 21 February 1731[1] and was buried in the chapel of Propaganda Fide. A biography of Néophytos Nasri was written by his disciple Ignatius Quandalaft.[4] Notes[edit]^ a b Graf, Georg (1960). "57.1"
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Barnabites
The Barnabites
Barnabites
are Catholic priests and Religious Brothers belonging to the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
religious order of the Clerics Regular of St. Paul (Latin: Clerici Regulares Sancti Pauli), founded in 1530. While they used to use the postnominal initials of simply "B.", they currently use C.R.S.P. Associated to the members of the Order are the Angelic Sisters of St
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Apostles Of The Sacred Heart Of Jesus
The Congregation of the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (ASCJ) is an international congregation of women religious, founded in Viareggio, Italy, in 1894, by the Venerable Mother Clelia Merloni (1861-1930).Contents1 History 2 Today 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Clelia Merloni was born to Gioacchino and Teresa Brandinelli Merloni on March 10, 1861, in Forli, Italy, and attended a private school in the suburbs. After experiencing religious life in different congregations, Clelia entered the Congregation of the Daughters of St. Mary of Divine Providence, founded in Como by Don Luigi Guanella. She wished establish a new congregation dedicated to works of charity and founded the Congregation of the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Viareggio, Italy, May 30, 1894.[1] The Congregation expanded rapidly and seemed to hold great promise. In 1895 her father died, leaving Clelia his estate
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Armenian Sisters Of The Immaculate Conception
The Order of the Armenian Catholic Sisters of the Immaculate Conception (Armenian: Անարատ հղության հայ քույրերի միաբանություն) is a religious order of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
founded on 5 June 1847 in Istanbul, Turkey. It was proposed in 1843 on the initiative of Archbishop Andon Hassounian who later became Catholicos and the first Cardinal of Armenian ancestry.[1][2] The Sisters had, around 1900, up to 30 schools in various countries in the Middle East, including Beirut, Cairo
Cairo
and Aleppo, Syria.[3] In America they operate the Armenian Sisters Academy with schools in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
(1963), Boston and Los Angeles.[4] References[edit]^ Congressional Record, V. 144, Pt
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Pauline Family
The Pauline Family is a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
congregation of nine Institutes of Consecrated Life (religious and aggregated institutes) and an association of lay collaborators, founded by Blessed James Alberione from 1914 onwards.Contents1 Mission 2 Members 3 Pauline Saints and Blesseds 4 See also 5 External linksMission[edit] The Pauline mission is to give the whole Christ, Jesus Master, Way, Truth and Life to the World using all suitable means of modern media, and more generally, to address the spiritual needs of the modern world in a modern way. Members[edit] The worldwide Pauline family consists of:Five Religious InstitutesSociety of St. Paul Daughters of St
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Assumptionists
The Augustinians
Augustinians
of the Assumption (A.A.) constitute a worldwide congregation of Catholic
Catholic
priests and brothers. It is active in many countries. The French branch played a major role in French political and social history in the 19th century.[1] It was founded in Nîmes, southern France, by Fr. Emmanuel d'Alzon in 1845, initially approved by Rome in 1857 and definitively approved in 1864 (the Constitutions were approved in 1923). The current Rule of Life of the congregation draws its inspiration from that of St. Augustine of Hippo. This international congregation is present in nearly 30 countries throughout the world, with the most recent foundations being established in 2006 in the Philippines, Vietnam, and Togo. The congregation has long been involved in education, the press, ecumenism, pilgrimages, and the missions
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Emmanuel D'Alzon
Emmanuel d'Alzon (August 30, 1810 – November 21, 1880) was a leading figure of the Church in France in the 19th century.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Middle years 1.3 Later Years2 See also 3 Notes 4 Further readingBiography[edit] Early years[edit] He was born in Le Vigan, Gard, in southern France, to an aristocratic and intensely Catholic family from the Cévennes Mountains, the oldest of four children. In 1816 the family moved to the family château of Lavagnac (Hérault) where d'Alzon received his early education at home at the hands of tutors. From 1823 to 1828 d'Alzon studied at the renowned Parisian colleges of Lycée Louis-le-Grand
Lycée Louis-le-Grand
and Collège Stanislas de Paris. It was at the end of his secondary studies that he came into contact with the influential thinker, Félicité de Lamennais, much of whose early teachings on the political order and Christian society would mark the young d'Alzon
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Augustinian Sisters, Servants Of Jesus And Mary
The Augustinian Sisters, Servants of Jesus and Mary was founded in Frosinone in 1827 by Maria Teresa Spinelli. They follow the Rule of St
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Austrian Congregation
The Austrian Congregation is a congregation of Benedictine monasteries situated in Austria, within the Benedictine Confederation.Contents1 History 2 Salzburg Congregation 3 Later history 4 Present Congregation 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Congregation was founded on 3 August 1625 by Pope Urban VIII, and consisted of eleven Benedictine monasteries in Austria:Altenburg Abbey Garsten Abbey Gleink Abbey Göttweig Abbey Kleinmariazell Abbey Kremsmünster Abbey Lambach Abbey Melk Abbey Mondsee Abbey Schottenstift, Vienna Seitenstetten AbbeySalzburg Congregation[edit] These were however not all the Benedictine monasteries of present-day Austria. Those in the Diocese of Salzburg
Diocese of Salzburg
were formed in 1641 into the Salzburg Congregation, consisting of:Admont Abbey Michaelbeuern Abbey Ossiach Abbey St. Paul's Abbey in the Lavanttal St
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Pope Urban VIII
Pope
Pope
Urban VIII (Latin: Urbanus VIII; baptised 5 April 1568 – 29 July 1644), reigned as Pope
Pope
from 6 August 1623 to his death in 1644. He expanded the papal territory by force of arms and advantageous politicking, and was also a prominent patron of the arts and a reformer of Church missions. However, the massive debts incurred during his pontificate greatly weakened his successors, who were unable to maintain the papacy's longstanding political and military influence in Europe. He was also involved in a controversy with Galileo
Galileo
and his theory on heliocentrism during his reign. No pope since has taken the name Urban.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life2 Papacy2.1 Politics 2.2 Patron of the arts 2.3 Later life 2.4 Death and legacy3 Private revelation 4 Portrayals in fiction 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit]C
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Basilian Chouerite Order Of Saint John The Baptist
The Basilian Chouerite Order of Saint John the Baptist is a religious order of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church
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Melkite Greek Catholic Church
The Melkite
Melkite
(Greek) Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(Arabic: كنيسة الروم الملكيين الكاثوليك‎, Kanīsat ar-Rūm al-Malakiyyīn al-Kāṯūlīk) is an Eastern Catholic
Eastern Catholic
Church in full communion with the Holy See
Holy See
as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. The Melkites, Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
Catholics of mixed Eastern Mediterranean (Levantine) and Greek origin, trace their history to the early Christians of Antioch, formerly part of Syria
Syria
and now in Turkey, of the 1st century AD, where Christianity was introduced by Saint Peter.[2][3] It is headed by His Beatitude Youssef Absi, S.M.S.P. The Melkite
Melkite
Church is a cognate (or sister ethno-cultural group) of the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, from which it separated de facto in the mid-18th century
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Angelic Sisters Of St. Paul
The Angelic Sisters of St. Paul (A.S.P.) are a Roman Catholic religious order founded by St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan in 1535.[1][2] The order is a female branch of uncloistered nuns of the Barnabite order. History[edit] Among the many evils that afflicted the church in Zaccaria's time was the ruin caused by heresy and corruption of morals in the convents of the holy virgins. In Milan especially, there was no longer any observance nor religious spirit in the cloisters.[3] The congregation was founded in the sixteenth century (1535) in Milan (Italy), by St. Anthony Maria Zaccaria. Their purpose was to be co-workers with the Barnabite Fathers in bringing about a renewal of faith in a society that had become very worldly.[4] Zaccaria was at that time spiritual director to the Countess Ludovica Torelli of Guastalla and guardian as well as director to some young girls whom he had, some time before, taken into a house (near St. Ambrose) to keep them from the dangers of the world
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Bavarian Congregation
The Bavarian Congregation is a congregation of the Benedictine Confederation consisting (with one exception) of monasteries in Bavaria, Germany. It was founded on 26 August 1684 by Pope Innocent XI
Pope Innocent XI
(1676-1689). First Congregation[edit] Until the secularisation of Bavaria
Bavaria
in 1803 the following abbeys belonged to the congregation: Andechs
Andechs
Abbey Attel Abbey Benediktbeuern Abbey Ensdorf Abbey Frauenzell Abbey Mallersdorf Abbey Michelfeld Abbey Oberaltaich Abbey Prüfening Abbey St
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