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List Of Timber Framing Tools
Tools used in traditional timber framing date back thousands of years. Similar tools are used in many cultures, but the shapes vary and some are pulled rather than pushed.Contents1 Gallery 2 Preparing timbers 3 Marking and measuring tools 4 Hand powered cutting tools 5 Powered cutting tools 6 Splitting tools 7 Holding tools 8 Material handling tools and equipment 9 Tool maintenance 10 Access 11 Safety 12 External linksGallery[edit]A folding type of race knife Race knife
Race knife
capable of making circles.(ritsmes en ritspasser met uitgeklapt). Image:Cultural Heritage Agency of the NetherlandsHand boring machine ( Carpentry
Carpentry
and Joinery magazine, 1925)A type of mortising chisel called in German a Stossaxt (Stoßaxt) or stichaxt
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Encyclopédie
Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers (English: Encyclopedia, or a Systematic Dictionary of the Sciences, Arts, and Crafts),[1] better known as Encyclopédie, was a general encyclopedia published in France
France
between 1751 and 1772, with later supplements, revised editions, and translations. It had many writers, known as the Encyclopédistes. It was edited by Denis Diderot and, until 1759, co-edited by Jean le Rond d'Alembert. The Encyclopédie
Encyclopédie
is most famous for representing the thought of the Enlightenment
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Winding Stick
In woodworking and carpentry, a pair of winding sticks is a tool that aids in viewing twist or wind in pieces of lumber (timber) by amplifying the defect.[1] Winding sticks can be as simple as any two straight sticks or they can be elegant, decorated, dimensionally stable wood like mahogany. A pair of framing squares may also be suitable. Traditionally they are 16 inches (41 cm)[1] to 30 inches (76 cm)[2] long 1.75 inches (4.4 cm) tall and tapered in their height from 3⁄8 inch (0.95 cm) to 1⁄8 inch (0.32 cm). The longer the winding sticks, the more they will amplify the wind
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Twybil
A twybil is a hand tool used for green woodworking.[1] It is used for chopping out mortises when timber framing, or making smaller pieces such as gates.[1] It combines chopping and levering functions in a single tool. The appearance of a twybil is that of a T-shaped double-edged axe with unusually long blades and a very short handle. This appearance is deceptive, as they are actually derived from a large double-ended chisel with a side handle added for better control. The geometry of a twybil, particularly the long straight blades, makes it unworkable as an axe. Unfortunately many old examples have been damaged by such misuse. The related mortising axe or 'Bec d'ane' (donkey's nose) is similar, but single-sided and is forged and tempered to survive the shock loads of swinging as an axe.[2] Twybils always have two working ends and these are always different. The first is an axe-like blade, with the edge arranged parallel to the handle. The second edge is crossways, as for an adze
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Japanese Plane
Japanese
Japanese
refers to something from or related to Japan, an island country in East Asia, including: Japanese
Japanese
language, spoken mainly in Japan
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Boring Machine (carpentry)
A carpenters boring machine is a hand-driven machine to bore holes in beams such in the process of making a mortise or making holes for the wooden pegs which hold mortise and tenon joints together.Contents1 History 2 Decline in use 3 External links 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Before boring machines were invented, carpenters used hand-powered augers to bore holes. Most common were T-handled augers. The shape of the drill bits changed over time, with the spoon bit and shell bit being common before the invention of the spiral or twist bit in 1771[1] which removes the cuttings as it turns. The exact origin of this invention is not known, but the earliest patent is in the United States in 1830 by J. Beckwith and was as tall as a man and operated by a large wheel from the side.[2] Boring machines use twist auger bits usually ranging in size from ​7⁄8 inch to 2 inches
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Auger (drill)
An auger is a drilling device, or drill bit, that usually includes a rotating helical screw blade called a "flighting" to act as a screw conveyor to remove the drilled out material. The rotation of the blade causes the material to move out of the hole being drilled.Contents1 Types 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTypes[edit]Auger (drill), 1849An auger used for digging post holes is called an earth auger, handheld power earth drill, soil auger, or mechanized post hole digger. This kind of auger can be a manually turned, handheld device, or powered by an electric motor or internal-combustion engine, possibly attached to a tractor (being provided with power by the tractor engine's power take-off as shown). Handheld augers can also be used for making holes for garden planting. Wood augers have a screw to pull them into the wood, as a gimlet has, and a cutting lip that slices out the bottom of the hole
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Hatchet
A hatchet (from the Old French hachete, a diminutive form of hache, 'axe' of Germanic origin) is a single-handed striking tool with a sharp blade on one side used to cut and split wood, and a hammer head on the other side. Hatchets may also be used for hewing when making flattened surfaces on logs; when the hatchet head is optimized for this purpose it is called a broadaxe.[citation needed] A hatchet is a type of hand axe; a small axe meant to be used with one hand.[1] Hatchets have a variety of uses, such as tasks normally done by a pocket knife when one is not present. The hatchet can also be used to create a fire through sparks and friction
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Proportion (architecture)
Proportion is a central principle of architectural theory and an important connection between mathematics and art. It is the visual effect of the relationships of the various objects and spaces that make up a structure to one another and to the whole
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Plumb-bob
A plumb bob, or plummet, is a weight, usually with a pointed tip on the bottom, suspended from a string and used as a vertical reference line, or plumb-line. It is essentially the vertical equivalent of a "water level". The instrument has been used since at least the time of ancient Egypt[1] to ensure that constructions are "plumb", or vertical. It is also used in surveying, to establish the nadir with respect to gravity of a point in space
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Combination Square
A combination square is a tool used for multiple purposes in woodworking, stonemasonry and metalworking. It is composed of a ruler and one or more interchangeable heads that may be affixed to it. The most common head is the standard or square head which is used to lay out or check right and 45° angles.[1] Invented in 1883 by Laroy S. Starrett,[2] the combination square continues to be a commonplace tool in home workshops, construction jobsites and metalworking. Uses[edit]Measuring angles — A combination square can reliably measure 90° and 45° angles. The 45° angle is used commonly in creating miter joints. Determining flatness — When working with wood the first step is to designate a reference surface on a board which is known as the face side. The rest of the workpiece is measured from the face side. Measuring the center of a circular bar or dowel
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Steel Square
The steel square is a tool used in carpentry. Carpenters use various tools to lay out structures that are square (that is, built at accurately measured right angles), many of which are made of steel, but the name steel square refers to a specific long-armed square that has additional uses for measurement, especially of various angles. Today the steel square is more commonly referred to as the framing square or carpenter's square. It consists of a long arm and a shorter arm, which meet at an angle of 90 degrees (a right angle). It can also be made of aluminum or polymers, which are light and resistant to rust. The wider arm, two inches wide, is called the blade; the narrower arm, one and a half inches wide, the tongue. The square has many uses, including laying out common rafters, hip rafters and stairs.[1] It has a diagonal scale, board foot scale and an octagonal scale
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Try Square
A try square is a woodworking or a metalworking tool used for marking and measuring a piece of wood. The square refers to the tool's primary use of measuring the accuracy of a right angle (90 degrees); to try a surface is to check its straightness or correspondence to an adjoining surface. A piece of wood that is rectangular, flat, and has all edges (faces, sides, and ends) 90 degrees is called four square. A board is often milled four square in preparation for using it in building furniture.[1] A traditional try square has a broad blade made of steel that is riveted to a wooden handle or "stock". The inside of the wooden stock usually has a brass strip fixed to it to reduce wear. Some blades also have graduations for measurement
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Shear Legs
Shear legs, also known as sheers, shears, or sheer legs, are a form of two-legged lifting device. Shear legs
Shear legs
may be permanent, formed of a solid A-frame
A-frame
and supports, as commonly seen on land and the floating sheerleg, or temporary, as aboard a vessel lacking a fixed crane or derrick. When fixed, they are often used for very heavy lifting, as in tank recovery, shipbuilding, and offshore salvage operations. At dockyards they hoist masts and other substantial rigging parts on board.[1] They are sometimes temporarily rigged on sailboats for similar tasks.Contents1 Uses1.1 On land 1.2 On water2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingUses[edit] On land[edit] Shear legs
Shear legs
are a lifting device related to the gin pole, derrick and tripod (lifting device)
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Storey Pole
A storey pole (or story pole, storey rod,[1] story stick,[2] jury stick,[3] scantling,[4] scantillon[5]) is a length of narrow board usually cut to the height of one storey.[6] It is used as a layout tool for any kind of repeated work in carpentry including stair-building, framing, timber framing, siding, brickwork, and setting tiles. The pole is marked for the heights from (usually) the floor platform of a building for dimensions such as window sill heights, window top heights (or headers), exterior door heights (or headers), interior door heights, wall gas jet heights (for gas lamps) and the level of the next storey joists. It makes for quick, repeatable measurements without the need of otherwise calibrated measuring devices or workers skilled in using them. Craftsmen use them to mark clapboard and brick courses so that, for example, a course ends neatly below a window sill or at a door's architrave
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Yard Stick
A yardstick is a straightedge used to physically measure lengths of up to one yard (3.0 feet or 0.9144 meters long) high. Yardsticks are flat boards with markings at regular intervals. In the metric system, a similar device measuring up to one meter is called a meter-stick.Contents1 Construction 2 Measurements 3 Application 4 ReferencesConstruction[edit] Yardsticks are often thin and rectangular, and made of wood or metal. Metal ones are often backed with a 'grippy' material, such as cork, to improve friction. They are relatively cheap, with most wood models costing under 5 US dollars. Measurements[edit]Yardsticks are most often marked with a scale in inches
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