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List Of Sasanian Revolts And Civil Wars
This is a list of civil wars or other organized internal civil unrests fought during the history of the Sasanian Empire
Sasanian Empire
(224–651)
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Shahrbaraz
Shahrbaraz
Shahrbaraz
or Shahrvaraz (died 9 June 630) was king of the Sasanian Empire from 27 April 630 to 9 June 630. He usurped the throne from Ardashir III, and was killed by Sasanian
Sasanian
nobles after forty days. Before usurping the Sasanian
Sasanian
throne he was a general (spahbed) under Khosrow II
Khosrow II
(590–628). He is furthermore noted for his important role during the climactic Byzantine– Sasanian
Sasanian
War of 602–628, and the events that followed afterwards
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Narseh
Narseh
Narseh
(Middle Persian: 𐭭𐭥𐭮𐭧𐭩‎ Persian: : نرسه‎, Narsē, whose name is also sometimes written as Narses or Narseus) was the seventh Sasanian
Sasanian
king of Ērānshahr
Ērānshahr
(293–302). He was the son of Shapur I
Shapur I
(240–270).[1] During the rule of his father Shapur I, Narseh
Narseh
had served as the governor of Sakastan, Sindh
Sindh
and Turan. Prior to becoming King of Persia, he held the title of "Great King of Armenia".[2] Narseh overthrew the increasingly unpopular Bahram III
Bahram III
in 293 with the support of most of the nobility. The circumstances of Narseh's rise to power are detailed in the Paikuli inscription
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Roman–Persian Wars
Roman Republic, succeeded by Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and Eastern Roman Empire laterClients/alliesAlbania Armenia Aksumites Commagene Germans Ghassanids Goths Göktürks Iberia Khazars Lazica Nabataeans Osroene PalmyraParthian Empire, succeeded by Sasanian EmpireClients/alliesAlbania Armenia Avars Iberia Lakhmids Lazica Osroene Sabirs Sclaveni XionitesCommanders and leadersCrassus †, Mark Antony, Ventidius, Corbulo, Trajan, Avidius Cassius, Statius Priscus, Lucius Verus, Septimius Severus, Caracalla, Macrinus, Alex
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Shapur II's Arab Campaign
Campaign or The Campaign may refer to:Advertising campaign Civil society campaign Military campaign Political campaign In agriculture, the period during which sugar beets are harvested and processedContents1 Places 2 Books 3 Film 4 Gaming 5 MusicPlaces[edit]Campaign, Tennessee, USABooks[edit]"The Campaign", the title of a poem by Joseph Addison Campaign (magazine), a British magazine serving the advertising industry
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Hephthalite–Persian Wars
Sasanian victoryThe Hephthalite state breaks into several minor kingdomsBelligerentsSasanian Empire Western Turkic Khaganate
Western Turkic Khaganate
(557-562) Hephthalite EmpireCommanders and leadersPeroz I † Mihran † Sukhra Kavadh I Khosrow I Istämi Khushnavaz Ghaftarv t eHephthalite–Persian WarsGorgan Herat Sukhra's expedition BukharaThe Hephthalite–Persian Wars, refers to a series of conflicts between the Hephthalites and the Sasanian Empire. See also[edit]Great Wall of Gorgan, a defense system created to prevent further Hephthalite incursions Bandian Fire TempleSources[edit]Vogelsang, W. J. (2003). "HERAT ii. HISTORY, PRE-ISLAMIC PERIOD". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. XII, Fasc. 2. pp. 205–206.  Schindel, Nikolaus (2013). "KAWĀD I i. Reign". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. XVI, Fasc. 2. pp. 136–141.  Fisher, William Bayne; Yarshater, Ehsan (1983)
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Göktürk–Persian Wars
The conflicts between the Gökturks
Gökturks
and the Sassanid Empire
Sassanid Empire
include:
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Abyssinian–Persian Wars
War
War
is a state of armed conflict between states or societies. It is generally characterized by extreme aggression, destruction, and mortality, using regular or irregular military forces. An absence of war is usually called "peace". Warfare refers to the common activities and characteristics of types of war, or of wars in general.[1] Total war is warfare that is not restricted to purely legitimate military targets, and can result in massive civilian or other non-combatant suffering and casualties. While some scholars see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature,[2] others argue it is a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.[3] The deadliest war in history, in terms of the cumulative number of deaths since its start, is World War
War
II, from 1939 to 1945, with 60–85 million deaths, followed by the Mongol conquests[4] at up to 60 million
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Muslim Conquest Of Persia
KhuzestanHormizd-Ardashir Susa Ram-Hormizd Shushtar GundishapurCentral PersiaNahavand Spahan Waj Rudh RayNorthern PersiaTabaristan Armenia Azerbaijan Caucasian Albania IberiaParsBishapur Darabgerd 1st Estakhr Gor 2nd EstakhrKermanSirjan QeshmSakastanZaranjKhorasan Oxus
Oxus
River Nishapur Herat Badghisv t eEarly Muslim
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Civil War
A civil war, also known as an intrastate war in polemology,[1] is a war between organized groups within the same state or country. The aim of one side may be to take control of the country or a region, to achieve independence for a region or to change government policies.[2] The term is a calque of the Latin bellum civile which was used to refer to the various civil wars of the Roman Republic in the 1st century BC. A civil war is a high-intensity conflict, often involving regular armed forces, that is sustained, organized and large-scale. Civil wars may result in large numbers of casualties and the consumption of significant resources.[3] Most modern civil wars involve intervention by outside powers. According to Patrick M
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Hormizd Of Sakastan
Hormizd of Sakastan
Sakastan
was a Sasanian
Sasanian
prince who was the leader of a revolt in Sakastan
Sakastan
and its surrounding regions. He was the son of Shapur Mishanshah, a Sasanian
Sasanian
prince who governed Maishan, and was the son of the Sassanian shah Shapur I. Hormizd's mother was a certain queen named Denag. Hormizd had many other siblings named Hormizdag, Odabakht, Bahram, Shapur, Peroz, and Shapurdukhtak. In 260, his father died and was probably succeeded by Denag as the governor of Maishan. In 271, he was appointed as the governor of Sakastan
Sakastan
and its surrounding regions. Three years later, when his cousin Bahram II ascended the throne, Hormizd's sister Shapurdukhtak
Shapurdukhtak
married the latter. In ca
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Battle Of Avarayr
Coordinates: 39°20′19.65″N 45°3′25.53″E / 39.3387917°N 45.0570917°E / 39.3387917; 45.0570917Battle of AvarayrA 15th century Armenian miniature depicting the battleDate 26 May 451[1]Location Avarayr Plain, Canton of Artaz, Vaspurakan, Greater Armenia (modern-day Chors, Chaypareh County, West Azarbaijan Province, Iran)Result Pyrrhic[2][3] Sassanid
Sassanid
military victory[4]Belligerents
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Great Wall Of Gorgan
Coordinates: 37°15′38″N 55°00′37″E / 37.2604343°N 55.010165°E / 37.2604343; 55.010165 (fort (14)) The Great Wall of Gorgan
Gorgan
was a Sasanian-era defense system located near modern Gorgan
Gorgan
in the Golestān Province
Golestān Province
of northeastern Iran, at the southeastern corner of the Caspian Sea. The western, Caspian Sea, end of the wall is near the remains of the fort at: 37°08′23″N 54°10′44″E / 37.13981°N 54.1788733°E / 37.13981; 54.1788733; the eastern end of the wall, near the town of Pishkamar, is near the remains of the fort at: 37°31′14″N 55°34′37″E / 37.5206739°N 55.5770498°E / 37.5206739; 55.5770498.[1] The title coordinate is for the location of the remains of a fort midway along the wall. The wall is located at a geographic narrowing between the Caspian Sea and the mountains of northeastern Iran
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Vache II
Vache
Vache
may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Persons 3 Others 4 See alsoPlaces[edit]Île à Vache, a small island lying off the south-west peninsula of Haiti La Vache, a cave in located in the Northern Range, on the north coast of Trinidad The Vache, an estate near Chalfont St
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Zarir
Zarir (also spelled Zarih) was a Sasanian
Sasanian
prince who was the leader of a rebellion in northern Iran in 485. According to Armenian historian Ghazar Parpetsi, who is the only source about the life of Zarir, the latter was a son of the Sasanian shah Yazdegerd II. He had several brothers named Balash, Hormizd III, and Peroz I. After the death of Peroz I
Peroz I
(who had succeeded his father as king), Balash
Balash
was elected as king by the nobility and clergy. Zarir, dissatisfied with the election, rebelled. Balash
Balash
was thus forced to make peace with his enemy Vahan Mamikonian
Vahan Mamikonian
and sent him at the head of an army to suppress the rebellion of Zarir. Zarir was shortly defeated, and fled to the mountains, but was quickly captured and "shot down like an animal". Sources[edit]Chaumont, M. L. (1988). "BALĀŠ"
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Kawus
Kawus (or Kayus; early Islamic sources: کیوس; Caoses according to Procopius of Caesarea) was the eldest son of Kavadh I, the Sasanian emperor of Iran. During the late reign of his father, Kawus was appointed as governor of Tabaristan, and was given the title of Padishkhwargar Shah
Shah
(king of Padishkhwargar).Contents1 Etymology 2 Biography 3 References 4 SourcesEtymology[edit] Kawus was probably named after the mythical/legendary king Kay Kawus (Avestan: Kauui Usan). The names of his father and his brothers also suggest a renewed late Sasanian
Sasanian
interest in the Iranian legendary history and particularly the Kayanid Dynasty. Biography[edit] Kawus might have initially been the heir presumptive to the Sasanian throne
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