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List Of People Nominated To U.S. Supreme Court In Last Year Of Presidency
Vacancies on the Supreme Court of the United States
Supreme Court of the United States
rarely arise during the last year of a presidency.[1][2][3] Following is a list of those people who were nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court during the last year of a president's last term. This list does not include presidents who never had an opportunity to serve what would have been their last year, due to resignation or death. Political scientist Michael Nelson wrote in 2012 that the U.S
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William Smith (South Carolina Senator)
William Smith (1762 – June 26, 1840) was chosen as a Democratic-Republican to the U.S. Senate representing South Carolina in 1816. The legislature declined to re-elect him when his term expired in 1823. He was narrowly chosen senator in 1826 and was again replaced in 1831. Smith was one of the first Southerners to argue, at the time of the Missouri Compromise
Missouri Compromise
in 1820, that slavery was a positive good; nevertheless, he opposed John C. Calhoun's doctrine and tactic of nullification. In 1828, seven electors from Georgia chose him for vice president, instead of Calhoun, the Democratic nominee
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John Paul Stevens
John Paul Stevens
John Paul Stevens
(born April 20, 1920) is an American lawyer and jurist who served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1975 until his retirement in 2010. At the time of his retirement, he was the second-oldest serving justice in the history of the Court,[1][2][3] the third-longest serving Supreme Court Justice in history and the last justice of the Greatest Generation.[4] Stevens is considered to have been on the liberal side of the Court at the time of his retirement.[5][6] Born in Chicago, Illinois, Stevens served in the United States Navy during World War II
World War II
and graduated from Northwestern University
Northwestern University
School of Law. After clerking for Justice Wiley Blount Rutledge, he co-founded a law firm in Chicago, focusing on antitrust law
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Jason Mazzone
Jason Mazzone (born 1970) is a jurist specialist of copyfraud and Professor of Law at the University of Illinois.[1][2] He is also the inventor of the term "copyfraud".[3] References[edit]^ "Jason Mazzone, Professor, Lynn H. Murray Faculty Scholar in Law", University of Illinois College of Law, accessed June 17, 2015 ^ Katyal, Sonia K. and Simone C. Ross. "Can technoheritage be owned?", The Boston Globe, May 1, 2016 ^ Mazzone, Jason (2005-08-25). "Copyfraud". Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network. SSRN 787244 . Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 168484195 LCCN: no2011027955 ISNI: 0000 0001 1541 663X GND: 1018483985 SUDOC: 157130649 BIBSYS: 13031997This American law-related biographical article is a stub
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Party Divisions Of United States Congresses
Party divisions of United States Congresses
Party divisions of United States Congresses
have played a central role in the organization and operations of both chambers of the United States Congress—the Senate and the House of Representatives—since its establishment as the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States in 1789. Political parties had not been anticipated when the U.S. Constitution was drafted in 1787, nor did they exist at the time the first Senate elections and House elections occurred in 1788 and 1789. Organized political parties developed in the U.S. in the 1790s, but political factions—from which organized parties evolved—began to appear almost immediately after the 1st Congress convened
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Antonin Scalia
Antonin Gregory Scalia (/ˈæntəˌnɪn skəˈliːə/ ( listen); March 11, 1936 – February 13, 2016)[1][n 1] was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1986 until his death in 2016. Appointed to the Court by President Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
in 1986, Scalia was described as the intellectual anchor for the originalist and textualist position in the Court's conservative wing.[9] Scalia was born in Trenton, New Jersey. He attended Xavier High School in Manhattan
Manhattan
and then college at Georgetown University
Georgetown University
in Washington, D.C. He obtained his law degree from Harvard Law School
Harvard Law School
and spent six years in a Cleveland
Cleveland
law firm before becoming a law school professor at the University of Virginia
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Michael Nelson (political Scientist)
Michael Nelson (born June 11, 1949)[1] is an American political scientist, noted for his work on the Presidency and elections. He is a Fulmer Professor of Political Science at Rhodes College and a Senior Fellow at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Awards 4 Publications 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Nelson was born and raised in New Milford, New Jersey. He studied at the College of William and Mary and graduated in 1971 with a BA. Afterward, he received both his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Johns Hopkins University. Career[edit] Nelson was an Assistant Professor (1979-1984) and then Associate Professor (1984-1991) at Vanderbilt University. He was appointed Professor of Political Science at Rhodes College in 1991 and has been Fulmer Professor of Political Science there since 2005
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Reporter Of Decisions Of The Supreme Court Of The United States
Decision may refer to: Decision making Decision support system Decision theoryContents1 Law and politics 2 Books 3 Sports 4 Film and TV 5 Music5.1 Albums 5.2 Songs6 See also6.1 Other disambiguation pagesLaw and politics[edit]
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John Adams
John Adams
John Adams
(October 30 [O.S. October 19] 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman and Founding Father
Founding Father
who served as the first Vice President (1789–97) and second President of the United States (1797–1801). He was a lawyer, diplomat, political theorist, and a leader of the movement for American independence from Great Britain. He was also a dedicated diarist and correspondent, particularly with his wife and closest advisor Abigail. Adams collaborated with his cousin, revolutionary leader Samuel Adams, but he established his own prominence prior to the American Revolution
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Federalist Party
The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration Party until the 3rd United States Congress, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to 1816, though its remnants lasted into the 1820s. The Federalists called for a strong national government that promoted economic growth and fostered friendly relationships with Great Britain as well as opposition to revolutionary France. The party controlled the federal government until 1801, when it was overwhelmed by the Democratic-Republican
Democratic-Republican
opposition led by Thomas Jefferson. The Federalist Party
Federalist Party
came into being between 1792 and 1794 as a national coalition of bankers and businessmen in support of Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies. These supporters developed into the organized Federalist Party, which was committed to a fiscally sound and nationalistic government
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John Jay
John Jay
John Jay
(December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829)[1] was an American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795). He directed U.S. foreign policy for much of the 1780s and was an important leader of the Federalist Party
Federalist Party
after the ratification of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
in 1788. Jay was born into a wealthy family of merchants and New York City government officials of Dutch descent. He became a lawyer and joined the New York Committee of Correspondence, organizing opposition to British policies in the time preceding the American Revolution. Jay was elected to the Second Continental Congress, and served as President of the Congress
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John Marshall
John Marshall
John Marshall
(September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American politician and the fourth Chief Justice of the United States (1801–1835). His court opinions helped lay the basis for United States constitutional law and many[who?] say he made the Supreme Court of the United States
United States
a coequal branch of government along with the legislative and executive branches. Previously, Marshall had been a leader of the Federalist Party
Federalist Party
in Virginia
Virginia
and served in the United States House of Representatives from 1799 to 1800. He was Secretary of State under President John Adams
John Adams
from 1800 to 1801 and, at the age of 45, became the last of the chief justices to be born in Colonial America. The longest-serving Chief Justice and the fourth longest-serving justice in U.S
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Table (parliamentary Procedure)
In parliamentary procedure, the verb to table has the opposite meaning in different countries:In the United States, to "table" usually means to postpone or suspend consideration of a pending motion. In the rest of the English-speaking world, such as in the United Kingdom and Canada, to "table" means to begin consideration (or reconsideration) of a proposal.Motions which use the word "table" have specific meanings and functions, depending on the parliamentary authority used
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David Souter
David Hackett Souter (/ˈsuːtər/; born September 17, 1939) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He served from October 1990 until his retirement in June 2009.[3] Appointed by President George H. W. Bush
George H. W. Bush
to fill the seat vacated by William J. Brennan, Jr., Souter sat on both the Rehnquist and Roberts courts and came to vote reliably with the court's liberal members.[4][5] He was the only Justice during his time on the Court with extensive prior court experience outside of a federal appeals court
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Sandra Day O'Connor
Sandra Day O'Connor
Sandra Day O'Connor
(born March 26, 1930) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
to 2006. She is the first woman to serve on the Court.[5] Prior to O'Connor's tenure on the Court, she was an elected official and judge in Arizona
Arizona
serving as the first female Majority Leader of a state senate as the Republican leader in the Arizona
Arizona
Senate.[6] Upon her nomination to the Court, O'Connor was confirmed unanimously by the Senate
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