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Lines On An Autumnal Evening
Lines on an Autumnal Evening was composed by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1793. The poem, rewritten throughout Coleridge's life, discusses nature and love. As Coleridge developed and aged, the object of the poem changed to be various women that Coleridge had feelings toward.Contents1 Background 2 Poems 3 Themes 4 Critical response 5 Notes 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] The poem, originally called Absence: A Poem describes Coleridge's moving to Ottery in August 1793 but claimed later in life that it dated back to 1792. The poem was addressed to a girl he met during June, Fanny Nesbitt, and is connected to two other poems dedicated to her: "On Presenting a Moss Rose to Miss F. Nesbitt" and "Cupid Turn'd Chymist"
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Lucy Newlyn
Lucy Newlyn
Lucy Newlyn
(born 1956) is a poet and academic, who is Emeritus Fellow in English at St. Edmund Hall, University of Oxford, having retired as professor of English Language and Literature there in 2016. Newlyn is a specialist in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century poetry.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Work 3 Poetry 4 Selected publications 5 ReferencesLife and career[edit] Lucy Newlyn
Lucy Newlyn
was born in 1956 in Kampala, Uganda.[2] She grew up in Leeds, where she attended Bennett Road Primary School and Lawnswood High School, winning an open scholarship to read English at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, in 1974.[3] She took up her Oxford place in 1975 and graduated with a Congratulatory First in 1978
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William Collins (poet)
William Collins (25 December 1721 – 12 June 1759) was an English poet. Second in influence only to Thomas Gray, he was an important poet of the middle decades of the 18th century. His lyrical odes mark a turn away from the Augustan poetry of Alexander Pope's generation and towards the Romantic era which would soon follow.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Works 4 Editions 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Chichester, Sussex, the son of a hatmaker and former mayor of the town, he was educated at The Prebendal School,[1] Winchester and Magdalen College, Oxford.[2] While still at the university, he published the Persian Eclogues (1742) which he had begun at school. After graduating in 1743 he was undecided about his future
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The Nightingale
The common nightingale is a songbird found in Eurasia. Nightingale may also refer to:Contents1 Birds 2 Literature 3 Music3.1 Performers 3.2 Albums 3.3 Songs4 People 5 Places 6 Television and film 7 Ships 8 Other usesBirds[edit]Thrush nightingale, a songbird found in Eurasia Red-billed leiothrix, a songbird of the Indian SubcontinentLiterature[edit]Nightingale (comics), a fictional superhero in the Marvel Comics universe "Nightingale" (story), a short story by Alastair Reynolds, in the 2006 collection Galactic North "The Nightingale" (fairy tale), a fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen The Nightingale (novel), a novel by Agnes Sligh Turnbull Nightingale the Robber, a character in Russian folklore The Nightingale: A Conversation Poem, a poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Nightingales, a poem by
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Coleridge's Theory Of Life
Romanticism
Romanticism
grew largely out of an attempt to understand not just inert nature, but also vital nature. Romantic works in the realm of art and Romantic medicine were a response to the general failure of the application of method of inertial science to reveal the foundational laws and operant principles of vital nature
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The Destruction Of The Bastile
Destruction refers to damage to an object, system, being or idea, as in legal damages and physical vandalismContents1 Concepts 2 Events 3 Comics and gaming 4 Music 5 Places 6 Television and film 7 See alsoConcepts[edit]Destruktion, a term from the philosophy of Martin Heidegger Destructive narcissism, a pathological form of narcissism Self-destructive behaviour, a widely used phrase that conceptualises certain kinds of destructive acts as belonging to the self Destroy (other) Damage (other) Final destruction (End of the World)Events[edit]NJPW Destruction, professional wrestling eventComics and gaming[edit] Destruction (DC Comics), one of the
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Pain
Pain
Pain
is a distressing feeling often caused by intense or damaging stimuli. The International Association for the Study of Pain's widely used definition defines pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage";[1] however, due to it being a complex, subjective phenomenon, defining pain has been a challenge
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
(/ˈkoʊləˌrɪdʒ/; 21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including suspension of disbelief
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To Sheridan
"To Sheridan" or "To Richard Brinsley Sheridan" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and published in the 29 January 1795 Morning Chronicle. As the last poem running as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series, it describes Coleridge's appreciation of Richard Brinsley Sheridan and his theatre talents. Coleridge, unlike most, preferred Sheridan's somber works over his comedies and emphasizes them within the poem. Coleridge also respects Sheridan's political actions.Contents1 Background 2 Poem 3 Themes 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Coleridge's "To Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Esq." became the final poem in his Sonnets on Eminent Characters series when it was published in the 29 January 1795 Morning Chronicle. It was revised somewhat and published again in Coleridge's 1796 collection of poems with a note about Hymettian Flowrets. It was reprinted again in 1803 without any changes
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To Priestley
"To Priestley" is a sonnet by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
first published in the 11 December 1794 Morning Chronicle. Like most of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters, "To Priestley" addresses an individual Coleridge particularly admired; Joseph Priestley
Joseph Priestley
held many political and theological beliefs that Coleridge adopted during this time.Contents1 Background 2 Poem 3 Themes 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Coleridge completed "To Priestley" at the beginning of December 1794. Following "To Burke", " To Priestley
To Priestley
was published in the 11 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as the third poem in the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series
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To Fayette
"To Fayette" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
and published in the 26 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. Coleridge, like other Romantic poets, viewed Gilbert du Motier, marquis de Lafayette
Gilbert du Motier, marquis de Lafayette
as a hero of liberty for his part in the American and French revolutions. The poem coincides with Fayette's imprisonment in Austria, and he is treated as a martyr for liberty. The language Coleridge uses within the poem to describe Fayette and revolutions appears in many of his later works.Contents1 Background 2 Poem 3 Themes 4 Critical response 5 Notes 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] "To Fayette" is the fourth poem of the Sonnets of Eminent Characters series and follows "To Priestley". It was completed at the beginning of December 1794 and published in the 15 December 1794 Morning Chronicle
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To Kosciusko
"To Kosciusko" is the name shared by three sonnets written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Leigh Hunt, and John Keats. Coleridge's, the original, was written in December 1794 and published in the 16 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as the fifth of his Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. Hunt and Keats were inspired to follow his poem with their own versions (under the same title) in November 1815 and December 1816, respectively. The sonnets were dedicated to heroism of Tadeusz Kościuszko, leader of the 1794 Polish rebellion against Prussian and Russian control.Contents1 Background 2 Poem2.1 Hunt's version 2.2 Keats's version3 Themes 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Towards the end of 1794, Coleridge began writing a series of sonnets called Sonnets on Eminent Characters. The first sonnet, "To Erskine", was printed on 1 December in the Morning Chronicle, and 10 more sonnets followed
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To Pitt
"To Pitt" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
and published in the 26 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. Describing William Pitt the Younger
William Pitt the Younger
and his role as Prime Minister of Great Britain, the poem is one of the few in the series that is not about a hero of Coleridge. Instead, Pitt is described as Judas, the betrayer of Christ, because of, among other issues, his treatment of political dissidents.Contents1 Background 2 Poem 3 Themes 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] During the end of 1794, Coleridge began work on the series Sonnets on Eminent Characters which he dedicated to people he respected. The first, "To Erskine", was printed on 1 December in the Morning Chronicle, and was followed by 10 further sonnets
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To Bowles
"To Bowles" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
and published in the 26 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. William Lisle Bowles's poetry was introduced to Coleridge in 1789 and Bowles had an immediate impact on Coleridge's views of poetry. The sonnet celebrates Bowles's status as a poet. The poem also discusses Bowles's political beliefs, as these views also help shaped Coleridge's ideas on government and politics.Contents1 Background 2 Poem 3 Themes 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Bowles had an important part in Coleridge's early poetry; he served as a model Coleridge.[1] This influence can be traced to when Coleridge was given a copy of Bowles's Sonnets, Written Chiefly on Picturesque Spots, During a Tour in 1789
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To Mrs Siddons
"To Mrs Siddons" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
and published in the 29 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. It describes Sarah Siddons, an actress that Coleridge became fond of during his visits to London during college. The poem celebrates watching Siddons perform her various roles on stage. It is uncertain as to the actual authorship of the poem, since it was attributed to Charles Lamb in various works. It is possible that Lamb and Coleridge worked on the poem together, and it would represent one of Lamb's earliest works.Contents1 Background 2 Poem 3 Themes 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Mrs Siddons, as Coleridge refers to her, was an actress that he became aware of during his college years
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To Godwin
"To Godwin" or "To William Godwin" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and published in the 10 January 1795 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. William Godwin was admired by Coleridge for his political beliefs. However, Coleridge did not support Godwin's atheistic views, which caused tension between the two. Although the poem praises Godwin, it invokes an argument that the two shared over theological matters. After the poem was written, the relationship between Coleridge and Godwin cooled and the poem was not reprinted.Contents1 Background 2 Poem 3 Themes 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Coleridge's "To William Godwin, Author of Political Justice" became the ninth sonnet in the series Sonnets on Eminent Characters in the 10 January 1795 Morning Chronicle
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