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Lillingstone Dayrell
Lillingstone Dayrell
Lillingstone Dayrell
is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. It is in Aylesbury
Aylesbury
Vale, about three and a half miles north of Buckingham, eight miles west of Milton Keynes
Milton Keynes
and five miles south of Towcester. Lillingstone Dayrell with Luffield Abbey
Lillingstone Dayrell with Luffield Abbey
and the neighbouring hamlet of Lillingstone Lovell
Lillingstone Lovell
are separate civil parishes within Aylesbury Vale district. The village name 'Lillingstone' is Anglo Saxon in origin, and means 'Lytel's boundary stone', referring to the proximity of both places to the border with Northamptonshire. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086 both settlements were recorded jointly as Lillingestan though already at that time there were two manors owned respectively by the Dayrell and Lovell families
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Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
(/ˈbʌkɪŋəmʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/), abbreviated Bucks,[1] is a county in South East England
England
which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the south, Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
to the west, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the north, Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north east and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the east. Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
is one of the home counties and towns such as High Wycombe, Amersham, Chesham
Chesham
and the Chalfonts in the east and southeast of the county are parts of the London commuter belt, forming some of the most densely populated parts of the county. Development in this region is restricted by the Metropolitan Green Belt
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Towcester
Towcester
Towcester
(/ˈtoʊstər/ TOH-stər), the Roman town of Lactodorum, is an affluent market town in south Northamptonshire, England.Contents1 Etymology 2 Location 3 Demography and expansion 4 Governance 5 Facilities 6 Sport 7 History7.1 Prehistoric and Roman periods 7.2 Saxon period and Medieval age 7.3 Georgian and Victorian periods 7.4 20th century and beyond8 Notable people from Towcester 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit]
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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California, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
(/ˈbʌkɪŋəmʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/), abbreviated Bucks,[1] is a county in South East England
England
which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the south, Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
to the west, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the north, Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north east and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the east. Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
is one of the home counties and towns such as High Wycombe, Amersham, Chesham
Chesham
and the Chalfonts in the east and southeast of the county are parts of the London commuter belt, forming some of the most densely populated parts of the county. Development in this region is restricted by the Metropolitan Green Belt
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Milton Keynes
Milton Keynes
Milton Keynes
(/ˌmɪltən ˈkiːnz/ ( listen) MIL-tən KEENZ), locally abbreviated to MK, is a large town[note 1] in the Borough of Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, of which it is the administrative centre. It was formally designated as a new town on 23 January 1967,[2] with the design brief to become a "city" in scale. It is located about 45 miles (72 km) north-west of London. At designation, its 89 km2 (34 sq mi) area incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton, and Stony Stratford, along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between
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Hamlet (place)
A hamlet is a small human settlement. In different jurisdictions and geographies, hamlets may be the size of a town, village or parish, be considered a smaller settlement or subdivision of a larger, or be treated as a satellite entity to a larger settlement. The word and concept of a hamlet have roots in the Anglo-Norman settlement of England, where the old French hamlet came to apply to small human settlements. In British geography, a hamlet is considered smaller than a village and distinctly without a church.Contents1 Etymology 2 Australia 3 Canada 4 France 5 Germany 6 India 7 Indonesia 8 Pakistan 9 Romania 10 Switzerland 11 Ukraine 12 United Kingdom 13 United States13.1 Mississippi 13.2 New York 13.3 Oregon14 Vietnam 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksEtymology[edit] The word comes from Anglo-Norman hamelet(t)e, corresponding to Old French hamelet, the diminutive of Old French
Old French
hamel
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List Of Members Of The European Parliament For The United Kingdom, 2014–19
Legislation1972 EC Act 1986 EC (Amendment) Act 1993 EC (Amendment) Act 1998 EC (Amendment) Act 2002 EC (Amendment) Act 2008 EU (Amendment) Act 2011 EU ActEuropean Parliament Elections1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 20141973 delegation 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8thWithdrawal2004–05 EU Bill 2013–14 EU (Referendum) Bill 2015–16 EU membership renegotiation 2015 EU Referendum Act 2016 EU (Referendum) Act (Gibraltar)2016 EU membership referendumCauses Endorsements Issues Opinion pollingCampaignsOrganisations advocating and campaigning for a referendumPeople's Pledge Labour for a ReferendumLeave Vote Leave
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Old English Language
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Northamptonshire
Coordinates: 52°17′N 0°50′W / 52.283°N 0.833°W / 52.283; -0.833NorthamptonshireCountyFlag Coat of armsMotto: Rosa concordiae signum[1] The rose, emblem of harmony Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
in EnglandSovereign state United KingdomCountry EnglandRegion East MidlandsCeremonial countyLord Lieutenant David Laing[2]High Sheriff Rupert Fordham[3]Area 2,364 km2 (913 sq mi) • Ranked 24th of 48Population (mid-2016 
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Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
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Manorialism
Manorialism
Manorialism
was an essential element of feudal society.[1] It was the organizing principle of rural economy that originated in the Roman villa system of the Late Roman Empire,[2] and was widely practiced in medieval western and parts of central Europe
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