HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Library Company Of Philadelphia
Coordinates: 39°56′52″N 75°09′47″W / 39.94779°N 75.16306°W / 39.94779; -75.16306 Library
Library
Company of PhiladelphiaEstablished 1731Location PhiladelphiaCollectionSize 500,000 books; 70,000 other itemsAccess and useCirculation Non-circulating collectionPopulation served Free and open to the publicMembers Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
originallyOther informationDirector Dr. Michael J. Barsanti[1]Staff 28Website http://www.librarycompany.org/The Library
Library
Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(LCP) is a non-profit organization based in Philadelphia
[...More...]

"Library Company Of Philadelphia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pound Sterling
3p, 4p, 6p,[1] 25p, £5, Sovereign (British coin), £20, £100, £500 (Silver Kilo), £1,000 (Gold Kilo)[2]DemographicsOfficial user(s) United Kingdom9 British territories British Antarctic Territory   Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
pound)   Gibraltar
Gibraltar
(alongside Gibraltar
Gibraltar
pound)   Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
(Tristan da Cunha; alongside Saint Helena pound
Saint Helena pound
in Saint Helena
Saint Helena
and Ascension)   South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands pound)   British Indian Ocean Territory
British Indian Ocean Territory
(de jure,
[...More...]

"Pound Sterling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Locke
John Locke
John Locke
FRS (/lɒk/; 29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".[1][2][3] Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Sir Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social contract theory. His work greatly affected the development of epistemology and political philosophy. His writings influenced Voltaire
Voltaire
and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, many Scottish Enlightenment thinkers, as well as the American revolutionaries
[...More...]

"John Locke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Antoine Arnauld
Antoine Arnauld
Antoine Arnauld
(February 6, 1612 – August 8, 1694)[1] — le Grand, as contemporaries called him, to distinguish him from his father — was a French Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
theologian, philosopher, and mathematician. He was one of the leading intellectuals of the Jansenist
Jansenist
group of Port-Royal and had a very thorough knowledge of patristics.Contents1 Biography 2 Principal works 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Antoine Arnauld
Antoine Arnauld
was born in Paris
Paris
to the Arnauld family. The twentieth and youngest child of the original Antoine Arnauld, he was originally intended for the bar, but decided instead to study theology at the Sorbonne
[...More...]

"Antoine Arnauld" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pierre Nicole
Pierre Nicole
Pierre Nicole
(19 October 1625 – 16 November 1695) was one of the most distinguished of the French Jansenists. Life[edit] Born in Chartres, he was the son of a provincial barrister, who took in charge his education. Sent to Paris
Paris
in 1642 to study theology, he soon entered into relations with the Jansenist
Jansenist
community at Port-Royal through his aunt, Marie des Anges Suireau, who was for a short time abbess of the convent, and he taught for a while at the Petites écoles de Port-Royal. Some scruple of conscience forbade him to proceed to the priesthood, and he remained throughout life a "clerk in minor orders," although a profound theological scholar. For some years he was a master in the "little school" for boys established at Port Royal, and had the honour of teaching Greek to young Jean Racine, the future poet
[...More...]

"Pierre Nicole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Plutarch
Plutarch
Plutarch
(/ˈpluːtɑːrk/; Greek: Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: [plǔːtarkʰos]; c. CE 46 – CE 120),[1] later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος)[a] was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
and Moralia.[2] He is classified[3] as a Middle Platonist
[...More...]

"Plutarch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Moralia
The Moralia
Moralia
(Ancient Greek: Ἠθικά Ethika; loosely translated as "Morals" or "Matters relating to customs and mores") of the 1st-century Greek scholar Plutarch
Plutarch
of Chaeronea
Chaeronea
is an eclectic collection of 78 essays and transcribed speeches. They provide insights into Roman and Greek life, but often are also timeless observations in their own right
[...More...]

"Moralia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Philemon Holland
Philemon Holland
Philemon Holland
(1552 – 9 February 1637) was an English schoolmaster, physician and translator. He is known for the first English translations of several works by Livy, Pliny the Elder, and Plutarch, and also for translating William Camden's Britannia into English.Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Works 4 Translation style 5 Reputation 6 Marriage and issue 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksFamily[edit] Philemon Holland, born at Chelmsford, Essex, in 1552, was the son of John Holland (died 1578), a member of the same Norfolk
Norfolk
family as John Holland, 1st Baron Holland (1603–1701)
[...More...]

"Philemon Holland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

John Penn ("the American")
John Penn (January 28, 1700[1][a] – October 25, 1746[2]) was a proprietor of colonial Pennsylvania. He was the eldest son of the colony's founder, William Penn, by his second wife, Hannah Callowhill Penn. He was the only one of Penn's children to be born in the New World (in the Slate Roof House
Slate Roof House
in Philadelphia) and was hence called "the American" by his family.Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 Citations 4 Works Cited 5 External linksLife[edit] Penn was raised by a cousin in Bristol, England, where he learned the trade of merchant in the linen trade. As a result of his father's will and by his mother's appointment, he received half of the proprietorship of Pennsylvania.[3] On May 12, 1732, John with his brothers Thomas Penn
Thomas Penn
and Richard Penn, as the proprietors of Pennsylvania, signed an order to create a commission
[...More...]

"John Penn ("the American")" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pennsbury Manor
Pennsbury Manor
Pennsbury Manor
was the colonial estate of William Penn, founder and proprietor of the Colony of Pennsylvania, who lived there from 1683 to 1701. Since 1939 it has been the name of a reconstructed manor on this property. Penn had his manor built on 8,000-acre (3,200 ha), part of his much larger grant of land from the Crown. This section was located about 25 miles north of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
along the Delaware River
Delaware River
in present-day Falls Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. After he returned to England, by the mid-18th century, the house and other buildings were deteriorating from neglect. From the early nineteenth century, the property changed hands numerous times. In 1929 the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
legislature authorized acquisition of the property by gift
[...More...]

"Pennsbury Manor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Antigua
Antigua
Antigua
(/ænˈtiːɡ(w)ə/ ann-TEE-g(w)a),[1] also known as Waladli or Wadadli by the native population, is an island in the West Indies. It is one of the Leeward Islands
Leeward Islands
in the Caribbean
Caribbean
region and the main island of the country of Antigua
Antigua
and Barbuda. Antigua
Antigua
and Barbuda became an independent state within the Commonwealth of Nations
Commonwealth of Nations
on 1 November 1981.[2] Antigua
Antigua
means "ancient" in Spanish after an icon in Seville Cathedral, "Santa Maria de la Antigua" — St. Mary
St. Mary
of the Old Cathedral.[3] The name Waladli[4] comes from the indigenous inhabitants and means approximately "our own".[citation needed] The island's circumference is roughly 87 km (54 mi) and its area 281 km2 (108 sq mi)
[...More...]

"Antigua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thirteen Colonies
The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America
North America
founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States
United States
of America. The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada and the Caribbean, as well as East and West Florida. In the 18th century, the British government operated its colonies under a policy of mercantilism, in which the central government administered its possessions for the economic benefit of the mother country
[...More...]

"Thirteen Colonies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geography
Geography
Geography
(from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, literally "earth description"[1]) is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of Earth.[2] The first person to use the word "γεωγραφία" was Eratosthenes (276–194 BC).[3] Geography
[...More...]

"Geography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Literature
Literature, most generically, is any body of written works. More restrictively, literature is writing considered to be an art form, or any single writing deemed to have artistic or intellectual value, often due to deploying language in ways that differ from ordinary usage. Its Latin root literatura/litteratura (derived itself from littera: letter or handwriting) was used to refer to all written accounts, though contemporary definitions extend the term to include texts that are spoken or sung (oral literature). The concept has changed meaning over time: nowadays it can broaden to have non-written verbal art forms, and thus it is difficult to agree on its origin, which can be paired with that of language or writing itself
[...More...]

"Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.