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Liberal-Conservative Party
The Liberal-Conservative Party
Liberal-Conservative Party
was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, and again from 1922 to 1938, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives before 1873. In many of Canada's early elections, there were both "Liberal-Conservative" and "Conservative" candidates; however, these were simply different labels used by candidates of the same party. Both were part of Sir John A. Macdonald's government and official Conservative and Liberal-Conservative candidates would not, generally,[clarification needed] run against each other
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Property Rights
The right to property or right to own property (cf. ownership) is often classified as a human right for natural persons regarding their possessions. A general recognition of a right to private property is found more rarely and is typically heavily constrained insofar as property is owned by legal persons (i.e
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Libertarianism
Libertarianism
Libertarianism
(from Latin: libertas, meaning "freedom") is a collection of political philosophies and movements that uphold liberty as a core principle.[1] Libertarians seek to maximize political freedom and autonomy, emphasizing freedom of choice, voluntary association, and individual judgment; they believe in individual rights.[2][3][4] Libertarians share a skepticism of authority and state power, but they diverge on the scope of their opposition to existing political and economic systems
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Tory
A Tory
Tory
(/tɔːri/) holds a political philosophy (Toryism) based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history. The Tory
Tory
ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction. In Britain, the Tory
Tory
political faction originated with the Cavaliers
Cavaliers
during the English Civil War. It also had exponents in other parts of the former British Empire, such as the Loyalists of British America
British America
who opposed American secession during the American War of Independence
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Canadian Nationalism
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Provincial and territorial courtsProvincial chief justicesConstitutionBritish North America Acts Peace, order, and good government Charter of Rights and FreedomsElectionsFederal electoral districts Federal electoral system 42nd federal election (2015) Provincial electoral districts Politics of the provincesLocal government Municipal governmentRelated topics
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Monarchism In Canada
Monarchism
Monarchism
is the advocacy of a monarch or monarchical rule.[1] A monarchist is an individual who supports this form of government, independent of any specific monarch; one who espouses a particular monarch is a royalist
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Loyalism
In general, loyalism is an individual's allegiance toward an established government, political party, or sovereign, especially during times of war and revolt
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Limited Government
In political philosophy, limited government is where governmental power is restricted by law, usually in a written constitution. It is a key concept in the history of liberalism. The Magna Carta
Magna Carta
and the United States Constitution
Constitution
represent important milestones in the limiting of governmental power
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Economic Liberalism
Economic liberalism
Economic liberalism
is an economic system organized on individual lines, which means the greatest possible number of economic decisions are made by individuals or households rather than by collective institutions or organizations.[1] It includes a spectrum of different economic policies, such as freedom of movement, but its basis is on strong support for a market economy and private property in the means of production. Although economic liberals can also be supportive of government regulation to a certain degree, they tend to oppose government intervention in the free market when it inhibits free trade and open competition. Economic liberalism
Economic liberalism
is associated with free markets and private ownership of capital assets. Historically, economic liberalism arose in response to mercantilism and feudalism
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Canadian Federalism
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court
Court
systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Pr
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Canadian Values
Canadian values
Canadian values
are the commonly shared ethical and human values of Canadians.[1] The major political parties have claimed explicitly that they uphold these values, but use generalities to specify them. Justin Trudeau after taking office as Prime Minister in 2015 tried to define what it means to be Canadian, saying that Canada
Canada
lacks a core identity but does have shared values:There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada....There are shared values — openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice. Those qualities are what make us the first postnational state.[2]Numerous scholars have tried to identify, measure and compare them with other countries. Baer et al. argue that, "Questions of national character and regional culture have long been of interest to both Canadian and American social scientists
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Tradition
A tradition is a belief or behavior passed down within a group or society with symbolic meaning or special significance with origins in the past.[1][2] Common examples include holidays or impractical but socially meaningful clothes (like lawyers' wigs or military officers' spurs), but the idea has also been applied to social norms such as greetings. Traditions can persist and evolve for thousands of years—the word "tradition" itself derives from the Latin
Latin
tradere literally meaning to transmit, to hand over, to give for safekeeping. While it is commonly assumed that traditions have ancient history, many traditions have been invented on purpose, whether that be political or cultural, over short periods of time. Various academic disciplines also use the word in a variety of ways. One way tradition is used more simply, often in academic work but elsewhere also, is to indicate the quality of a piece of information being discussed
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Conservative Party Of Quebec (2009–present)
Conservatism
Conservatism
is a political and social philosophy promoting traditional social institutions in the context of culture and civilization. The central tenets of conservatism include tradition, human imperfection, organic society, hierarchy and authority and property rights.[1] Conservatives seek to preserve a range of institutions such as monarchy, religion, parliamentary government and property rights with the aim of emphasizing social stability and continuity[2] while the more extreme elements called reactionaries oppose modernism and seek a return to "the way things were".[3][4] The first established use of the term in a political context originated in 1818 with François-René de Chateaubriand[5] during the period of Bourbon restoration
Bourbon restoration
that sought to roll back the policies of the French Revolution
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Libertarian Party Of Canada
The Libertarian Party of Canada
Canada
(French: Parti libertarien du Canada) is a federal political party in Canada, founded in 1973.[1] The party subscribes to classical liberal tenets of the libertarian movement across Canada. The mission of the party is to reduce the size, scope and cost of government.[4] Policies the party advocates for include: ending drug prohibition, lowering taxes, protecting gun rights and non-interventionism.[5]Contents1 History 2 Election results 3 Leaders[1] 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The party was founded on July 7, 1973 by Bruce Evoy[citation needed], who became its first chairman, and seven others. Evoy ran for election to Parliament in the 1974 federal election in the Toronto
Toronto
riding of Rosedale
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Rule Of Law
The rule of law is the principle that law should govern a nation, as opposed to being governed by decisions of individual government officials. It primarily refers to the influence and authority of law within society, particularly as a constraint upon behaviour, including behaviour of government officials.[2] The phrase can be traced back to 16th century Britain, and in the following century the Scottish theologian Samuel Rutherford
Samuel Rutherford
used the phrase in his argument against the divine right of kings.[3] John Locke
John Locke
wrote that freedom in society means being subject only to laws made by a legislature that apply to everyone, with a person being otherwise free from both governmental and private restrictions upon liberty. The "rule of law" was further popularized in the 19th century by British jurist A. V. Dicey
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Canadian Federal Election, 1891
John A. Macdonald ConservativePrime Minister-designate John A. Macdonald ConservativeThe Canadian federal election of 1891 was held on March 5 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada
Canada
of the 7th Parliament of Canada. It was won by the Conservative Party of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald.A Conservative election poster from 1891.The main issue of the 1891 campaign was Macdonald's National Policy, a policy of protective tariffs. The Liberals supported reciprocity (free trade) with the United States. Macdonald led a conservative campaign emphasizing stability, and retained the Conservatives' majority in the House of Commons. It was a close election and he campaigned hard
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