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Liang Ji
Liang Ji (梁冀) (died 159), courtesy name Bozhuo (伯卓), was a politician and military commander of Han Dynasty
Han Dynasty
China. He dominated government in the 150s together with his sister, Empress
Empress
Liang Na. After his sister's death, Liang Ji was overthrown in a coup d'etat by Emperor Huan, with the support of the eunuch faction, in 159. The Liang clan and the clan of his wife, Sun Shou (孫壽), were slaughtered.Contents1 Family background and early career 2 As Grand Marshal under Emperor Shun 3 As Grand Marshal under Emperors Chong and Zhi 4 As Grand Marshal under Emperor Huan 5 Loss of power and death 6 ReferencesFamily background and early career[edit] Liang Ji was the oldest son of Liang Shang (梁商) -- an honest official who was also the Marquess of Chengshi, being the grandson of a brother of Consort Liang, the mother of Emperor He
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Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
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Ménage à Trois
A ménage à trois is a domestic arrangement in which three people having romantic or sexual relations with each other occupy the same household. It is a form of polyamory.Contents1 Lexicology 2 Historical instances 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLexicology[edit] The term ménage à trois is a French term that means "household of three". There are other terms in English with similar or identical meanings, such as throuple, which is a blend of three and couple, a triad relationship, and trigamy or trinogamy, which refers to a committed relationship between three people that is limited and exclusive. Historical instances[edit] History has a number of examples of ménages à trois relationships. The Bible, as a literary document, has an example of this kind of relationship
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Zizhi Tongjian
The Zizhi Tongjian
Zizhi Tongjian
(Chinese: 資治通鑑; literally: "Comprehensive Mirror in Aid of Governance") is a pioneering reference work in Chinese historiography, published in 1084 , in the form of a chronicle. In 1065 AD, Emperor Yingzong of Song
Emperor Yingzong of Song
ordered the great historian Sima Guang
Sima Guang
(1019–1086 AD) to lead with other scholars such as his chief assistants Liu Shu, Liu Ban and Fan Zuyu,[1] the compilation of a universal history of China. The task took 19 years to be completed,[1] and, in 1084 AD, it was presented to his successor Emperor Shenzong of Song
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Huo Guang
Huo Guang
Huo Guang
(Chinese: 霍光; died 68 BC), courtesy name Zimeng (子孟), was a Western Han politician who was a rare example in Chinese history of a powerful official who deposed an emperor for the good of the state rather than to usurp the throne. He was the half-brother of renowned Han general Huo Qubing.Contents1 Service under Emperor Wu 2 Service under Emperor Zhao 3 The Prince He Incident and the installation of Emperor Xuan 4 Service under Emperor Xuan 5 Death and subsequent destruction of the Huo clan 6 Impact on Chinese history 7 NotesService under Emperor Wu[edit] Huo's early career in Han government was not well documented, but it is known that as of 88 BC—near the end of Emperor Wu's reign, he was already a high-ranked official with dual titles of Fengche Duwei (奉車都尉) and Guanglu Dafu (光祿大夫)
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Xiao He
Xiao He
Xiao He
(died 193 BC) was a Chinese statesman of the early Western Han dynasty. He served Liu Bang (Emperor Gao), the founder of the Han dynasty, during the insurrection against the Qin dynasty, and fought on Liu's side in the Chu–Han Contention
Chu–Han Contention
against Liu's rival, Xiang Yu. After the founding of the Han dynasty, Xiao He
Xiao He
became the chancellor and held office until his death
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Duke Of Zhou
Dan, Duke Wen of Zhou (11th Century BC), commonly known as the Duke of Zhou (Chinese: 周公; pinyin: Zhōu Gōng), was a member of the royal family of the Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
who played a major role in consolidating the kingdom established by his elder brother King Wu.[1][2] He was renowned for acting as a capable and loyal regent for his young nephew King Cheng, and for successfully suppressing the Rebellion of the Three Guards
Three Guards
and establishing firm rule of the Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
over eastern China. He is also a Chinese culture hero credited with writing the I Ching
I Ching
and the Book of Poetry,[3] establishing the Rites of Zhou, and creating the yayue of Chinese classical music.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy2.1 God of Dreams 2.2 Descendants3 See also 4 References4.1 Citations 4.2 Works cited5 External linksLife[edit] His personal name was Dan (旦)
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Wang Mang
Wang Mang
Wang Mang
(Chinese: 王莽, c. 45 BC – 6 October 23 AD), courtesy name Jujun (巨君), was a Han Dynasty
Han Dynasty
official who seized the throne from the Liu
Liu
family and founded the Xin (or Hsin, meaning "renewed"[1]) Dynasty
Dynasty
(新朝), ruling 9–23 AD. The Han dynasty
Han dynasty
was restored after his overthrow, and his rule marks the separation between the Western Han Dynasty
Han Dynasty
(before Xin) and Eastern Han
Eastern Han
Dynasty (after Xin). Some historians have traditionally viewed Wang as a usurper, while others have portrayed him as a visionary and selfless social reformer
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Slavery
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
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Regent
A regent (from the Latin
Latin
regens,[1] "[one] ruling"[2]) is "a person appointed to administer a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated."[3] The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent". If the formally appointed regent is unavailable or cannot serve on a temporary basis, a Regent
Regent
ad interim may be appointed to fill the gap. In a monarchy, a regent usually governs due to one of these reasons, but may also be elected to rule during the interregnum when the royal line has died out
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Empress Dowager
Empress dowager
Empress dowager
(also dowager empress or empress mother) (Chinese and Japanese: 皇太后; pinyin: húangtàihòu; rōmaji: Kōtaigō; Korean: 황태후; romaja: Hwang Tae Hu; Vietnamese: Hoàng Thái Hậu; hiragana: こうたいごう) is the English language translation of the title given to the mother or widow of a Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Vietnamese emperor. The title was also given occasionally to another woman of the same generation, while a woman from the previous generation was sometimes given the title of grand empress dowager (Chinese and Japanese: 太皇太后; pinyin: tàihúangtàihòu; rōmaji: Taikōtaigō; Korean pronunciation: Tae Hwang Tae Hu; Vietnamese: Thái Hoàng Thái Hậu; hiragana: たいこうたいごう). Numerous empress dowagers held regency during the reign of underage emperors. Many of the most prominent empress dowagers also extended their control for long periods after the emperor was old enough to govern
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Chinese Surname
Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam
Vietnam
and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing (Chinese: 姓; pinyin: xìng) or clan names, and shi (Chinese: 氏; pinyin: shì) or lineage names. Chinese family names are patrilineal, passed from father to children (in adoption, the adoptee usually also takes the same surname). Women do not normally change their surnames upon marriage, except in places with more Western influences such as Hong Kong. Traditionally Chinese surnames have been exogamous.[1][2] The colloquial expressions laobaixing (老百姓; lit. "old hundred surnames") and bǎixìng (百姓, lit
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Luoyang
Luoyang, formerly romanized as Loyang, is a city located in the confluence area of Luo River and Yellow River
Yellow River
in Central China. It is a prefecture-level city in western Henan
Henan
province. It borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
to the east, Pingdingshan
Pingdingshan
to the southeast, Nanyang to the south, Sanmenxia
Sanmenxia
to the west, Jiyuan
Jiyuan
to the north, and Jiaozuo
Jiaozuo
to the northeast
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Marches
A march or mark was, in broad terms, a medieval European term for any kind of borderland, as opposed to a notional "heartland". More specifically, a march was a border between realms, and/or a neutral/buffer zone under joint control of two states, in which different laws might apply. In both of these senses, marches served a political purpose, such as providing warning of military incursions, or regulating cross-border trade, or both. Just as counties were traditionally ruled by counts, marches gave rise to titles such as: marquess (masculine) or marchioness (feminine) in England, marquis (masc.) or marquise (fem.) in France and Scotland, margrave (Markgraf i.e. "march count"; masc.) or margravine (Markgräfin i.e
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Empress
An emperor (through Old French
Old French
empereor from Latin imperator[1]) is a monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. Empress, the female equivalent, may indicate an emperor's wife (empress consort), mother (empress dowager), or a woman who rules in her own right (empress regnant). Emperors are generally recognized to be of a higher honour and rank than kings. In Europe
Europe
the title of Emperor
Emperor
has been used since the Middle Ages, considered in those times equal or almost equal in dignity to that of Pope, due to the latter's position as visible head of the Church and spiritual leader of the Catholic part of Western Europe
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