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Li Zicheng
Li Zicheng
Li Zicheng
(22 September 1606 – 1645), born Li Hongji, also known by the nickname, "Dashing King",[1] was a Chinese rebel leader who overthrew the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
in 1644 and ru
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Henan
Henan
Henan
(Chinese: 河南) is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. Henan
Henan
is often referred to as Zhongyuan or Zhongzhou (中州) which literally means "central plain land" or "midland", although the name is also applied to the entirety of China
China
proper. Henan
Henan
is the birthplace of Chinese civilization with over 3,000 years of recorded history, and remained China's cultural, economical, and political center until approximately 1,000 years ago. Henan province
Henan province
is a home to a large number of heritage sites which have been left behind including the ruins of Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
capital city Yin and the Shaolin Temple
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The Deer And The Cauldron
The Deer and the Cauldron, also known as The Duke of Mount Deer, is a novel by Jin Yong
Jin Yong
(Louis Cha) and the last and longest of his novels. The novel was initially published in Hong Kong as a serial, and ran from 24 October 1969 to 23 September 1972 in the newspaper Ming Pao.[1] Although the book is often referred to as a wuxia novel, it is not quite typical of the genre: the protagonist, Wei Xiaobao, is not an adept martial artist, but rather an antihero who relies on wit and cunning to get out of trouble.Contents1 Title 2 Plot 3 Characters 4 Miscellaneous information4.1
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Jin Yong
Louis Cha Leung-yung, GBM, OBE (Chinese: 查良鏞; Sidney Lau: Cha4 Leung4 Yung4) (born February 6 1924), better known by his pen name Jin Yong, is a Chinese wuxia novelist and essayist who co-founded the Hong Kong daily newspaper Ming Pao
Ming Pao
in 1959 and served as the newspaper's first editor-in-chief. His fictional novels of the wuxia ("martial arts and chivalry") genre have a widespread following in many Chinese-speaking areas, including Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, and the United States. His 15 works written between 1955 and 1972 earned him a reputation as one of the greatest and most popular wuxia writers ever. He is currently the best-selling Chinese author alive, and over 100 million copies of his works have been sold worldwide[2] (not including an unknown number of pirated copies).[3] His works have been translated into many languages including English, French, Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese, Thai, Burmese, Malay and Indonesian
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Wuxia
Wuxia
Wuxia
(武俠, IPA: [ù.ɕjǎ]), which literally means "martial heroes", is a genre of Chinese fictions concerning the adventures of martial artists in ancient China. Although wuxia is traditionally a form of fantasy literature, its popularity has caused it to spread to diverse art forms such as Chinese opera, manhua, films, television series and video games. It forms part of popular culture in many Chinese-speaking communities around the world. The word "wuxia" is a compound composed of the elements wu (literally "martial", "military", or "armed") and xia (literally "chivalrous", "vigilante" or "hero"). A martial artist who follows the code of xia is often referred to as a xiake (literally "follower of xia") or youxia (literally "wandering xia")
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Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(Cantonese: [hœ́ːŋ.kɔ̌ːŋ] ( listen)), officially the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Special
Special
Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory on the eastern side of the Pearl River estuary in East Asia. Along with Macau, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, and several other major cities in Guangdong, the territory forms a core part of the Pearl River Delta
Pearl River Delta
metropolitan region, the most populated area in the world
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Liang Yusheng
Chen Wentong (5 April 1926 – 22 January 2009), better known by his pen name Liang Yusheng, was a Chinese writer. Credited as the pioneer of the "New School" (新派) of the wuxia genre in the 20th century, Chen was one of the best known wuxia writers in the later half of the century, alongside Jin Yong
Jin Yong
and Gu Long.Contents1 Life 2 Style of writing 3 Works 4 Adaptation 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Chen was born in a family of scholars in Mengshan County, Guangxi Province in Republican China. He was well versed in ancient Chinese classics and duilian and could recite the Three Hundred Tang Poems
Three Hundred Tang Poems
by the age of seven. He started writing poems when he was attending Guilin High School in Guangxi. He was tutored by Jian Youwen, who specialised in the history of the Taiping Rebellion, and Rao Zongyi, who was well read in poetry, humanities, art and the history of Dunhuang
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Baifa Monü Zhuan
Baifa Monü Zhuan is a wuxia novel by Liang Yusheng. It was serialised between 5 August 1957 and 10 December 1958 in the Hong Kong newspaper Sin Wun Pao. It is closely related to Qijian Xia Tianshan and Saiwai Qixia Zhuan. The novel has been adapted into films and television series, such as The Bride with White Hair (1993) and The Romance of the White Hair Maiden (1995), and The White Haired Witch of Lunar Kingdom (2014). The novel has been variously translated as Biography of the White-Haired Succuba[1] and Romance of the White-Haired Maiden.[2]Contents1 Plot 2 Characters 3 Adaptations3.1 Films 3.2 Television4 ReferencesPlot[edit] The story begins in the Ming dynasty during the final years of the reign of the Wanli Emperor (r.  1572–1620). Lian Nichang, a female bandit leader nicknamed "Jade Rakshasa", is introduced as an impressive vigilante-heroine who uses her legendary swordplay skills to uphold justice and punish the wicked
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Mandate Of Heaven
The Mandate of Heaven
Heaven
or Tin Ming, Tian
Tian
Ming (Chinese: 天命; pinyin: Tiānmìng; Wade–Giles: T'ien-ming) and in various dialectal spellings, is a Chinese political and religious doctrine used since ancient times to justify the rule of the Emperor of China. According to this belief, heaven (天, Tian)—which embodies the natural order and will of the universe—bestows the mandate on a just ruler of China, the "Heavenly Son" of the "Celestial Empire". If a ruler was overthrown, this was interpreted as an indication that the ruler was unworthy, and had lost the mandate
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Xi'an
Xi'an
Xi'an
is the capital of Shaanxi
Shaanxi
Province, People's Republic of China. It is a sub-provincial city located in the center of the Guanzhong Plain in Northwestern China.[3] One of the oldest cities in China,
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Shaanxi
Shaanxi
Shaanxi
(Chinese: 陕西; pinyin: Shǎnxī) is a province of the People's Republic of China. Officially part of the Northwest China region, it lies in central China, bordering the provinces of Shanxi (NE, E), Henan
Henan
(E), Hubei
Hubei
(SE), Chongqing
Chongqing
(S), Sichuan
Sichuan
(SW), Gansu (W), Ningxia
Ningxia
(NW), and Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
(N). It covers an area of over 205,000 km2 (79,151 sq mi) with about 37 million people. Xi'an
Xi'an
– which includes the sites of the former Chinese capitals Fenghao
Fenghao
and Chang'an
Chang'an
– is the provincial capital
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Shanxi
Shanxi
Shanxi
(Chinese: 山西; pinyin:  Shānxī; postal: Shansi) is a province of China, located in the North China
China
region. Its one-character abbreviation is "晋" (pinyin: Jìn), after the state of Jin that existed here during the Spring and Autumn period. The name Shanxi
Shanxi
means "West of the Mountains", a reference to the province's location west of the Taihang Mountains.[5] Shanxi
Shanxi
borders Hebei
Hebei
to the east, Henan
Henan
to the south, Shaanxi
Shaanxi
to the west, and Inner Mongolia to the north and is made up mainly of a plateau bounded partly by mountain ranges
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Xiangyang
Xiangyang
Xiangyang
is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Hubei
Hubei
province, People's Republic of China. It was known as Xiangfan until December 2, 2010.[2] Xiangyang
Xiangyang
is divided by the Han River, which runs through its heart and divides the city north-south. The city itself is an incorporation of two once separate, ancient cities: Fancheng
Fancheng
and Xiangcheng District. What remains of old Xianyang
Xianyang
is located south of the Han River and contains one of the oldest still-intact city walls in China
China
while Fancheng
Fancheng
was located to the north of the Han River. Both cities served prominent historical roles in both the Ancient and Pre-Modern Periods of Chinese history
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Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters
Chinese characters
prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
and Singapore. Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese
characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, and the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan)
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Li (李)
Li (Chinese: 李; pinyin: Lǐ) is the second most common surname in China, behind only Wang.[1][2] It is one of the most common surnames in the world, shared by 92.76 million people in China,[1] and more than 100 million worldwide.[3] It is the fourth name listed in the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
classic text Hundred Family Surnames.[4] The name is pronounced as "Lei" in Cantonese, but is often spelled as Lee in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan
Taiwan
and many other overseas Chinese communities. In Macau, it is also spelled as Lei
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