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Li Shen
Li Shen (李紳) (died July 29, 846[1][2]), courtesy name Gongchui (公垂), formally Duke Wensu of Zhao (趙文肅公), was an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reign of Emperor Wuzong. He was also noted as a poet.Contents1 Background 2 During Emperor Xianzong's reign 3 During Emperor Muzong's reign 4 During Emperor Jingzong's reign 5 During Emperor Wenzong's reign 6 During Emperor Wuzong's reign 7 During Emperor Xuānzong's reign 8 Notes and references 9 External linksBackground[edit] It is not known when Li Shen was born
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Courtesy Name
A courtesy name (Chinese: 字, zi), also known as a style name,[1] is a name bestowed upon one at adulthood in addition to one's given name.[2] This practice is a tradition in East Asian cultures, including China, Japan, Korea
Korea
and Vietnam.[3] Formerly in China, the zi would replace a male's given name when he turned twenty, as a symbol of adulthood and respect.[citation needed] It could be given either by the parents or by the first personal teacher on the first day of family school. Females might substitute their given name for a zi upon marriage
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Emperor Jingzong Of Tang
Emperor Jingzong of Tang (July 22, 809 – January 9, 827), personal name Li Zhan, was an emperor of the Tang Dynasty of China. He reigned from 824 to 827. Emperor Jingzong was the eldest son of emperor Emperor Muzong and elder brother of eventual Emperor Wenzong and Emperor Wuzong. Emperor Jingzong became emperor at the early age of 15 and his short reign would be overshadowed by corrupt eunuchs with control over the imperial Shence Army (神策軍), who would come to dominate his rule as well as that of his younger brother Emperor Wenzong. Uninterested in ruling, Jingzong gave in to pleasure seeking and lived in opulence while eunuchs such as Wang Shoucheng and officials such as Li Fengji held onto real power. Around the new year 827, after reigning less than four years, emperor Jingzong was assassinated by a group of conspirators
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Old Book Of Tang
The Old Book of Tang, or simply the Book of Tang, is the first classic historical work about the Tang dynasty, comprising 200 chapters, and is one of the Twenty-Four Histories. Originally compiled during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period, it was superseded by the New Book of Tang which was compiled in the Song dynasty, but later regained acceptance.Contents1 Structure 2 History 3 References 4 Works cited 5 External linksStructure[edit] The Old Book of Tang
Old Book of Tang
comprises 200 chapters.[1] History[edit] The book began when Later Jin's founding emperor Shi Jingtang
Shi Jingtang
ordered its compilation in 941. The original chief editor was Zhao Ying (趙瑩), who was also the chancellor then
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New Book Of Tang
The New Book of Tang (Xīn Tángshū), generally translated as "New History of the Tang", or "New Tang History", is a work of official history covering the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
in ten volumes and 225 chapters. The work was compiled by a team of scholars of the Song dynasty, led by Ouyang Xiu
Ouyang Xiu
and Song Qi. It was originally simply called the Tangshu (Book of Tang) until the 18th century.Contents1 History 2 Contents2.1 Biographies3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] In Chinese history, it was customary for dynasties to compile histories of the dynasty preceding them as a means of cementing their own legitimacy
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History Of China
The earliest known written records of the history of China
China
date from as early as 1250 BC,[1][2] from the Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
(c. 1600–1046 BC).[3] Ancient historical texts such as the Records of the Grand Historian (c. 100 BC) and the Bamboo Annals (296 BC) describe a Xia dynasty (c. 2070–1600 BC) before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period, and Shang
Shang
writings do not indicate the existence of the Xia.[3][4] The Shang
Shang
ruled in the Yellow River
Yellow River
valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic
Neolithic
civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River
Yellow River
and Yangtze
Yangtze
River
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Pei Du
Pei Du
Pei Du
(裴度) (765 – April 21, 839[1]), courtesy name Zhongli (中立), formally Duke Wenzhong of Jin (晉文忠公), was an official of the Chinese Tang dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reigns of Emperor Xianzong, Emperor Xianzong's son Emperor Muzong, and Emperor Xianzong's grandsons Emperor Jingzong and Emperor Wenzong. Although a civilian official, he was also known for his military strategies, and he is best known for being in charge of the campaign against the warlord Wu Yuanji during Emperor Xianzong's reign.Contents1 Background 2 During Emperor Xianzong's reign 3 During Emperor Muzong's reign 4 During Emperor Jingzong's reign 5 During Emperor Wenzong's reign 6 Notes and referencesBackground[edit] Pei Du
Pei Du
was born in 765, during the reign of Emperor Daizong
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Nanchang
Nanchang
Nanchang
(Chinese: 南昌) is the capital of Jiangxi
Jiangxi
Province in southeastern China.[2] Nanchang
Nanchang
City (Mandarin: Nánchāng shì, Gan Dialect Chinese: lan31chɔŋ11 si32) is abbreviated as “Hong” or “Chang” and is also called “Eastern Edinburgh, Hero City of the World”. Nanchang
Nanchang
is the capital of Jiangxi
Jiangxi
Province in the People's Republic of China, the third largest city in central China
China
and the middle reaches of the Yangtze River, and the largest city in Jiangxi. Nanchang
Nanchang
is located in the central part of Jiangxi
Jiangxi
Province, with a history of more than 2,200 years. It was called “Yuzhang”, “Hongdu” and “Hongcheng”. It is located in the hinterland of Yuzhang Plain
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Jiangxi
Jiangxi
Jiangxi
( Jiāngxī), formerly spelled as Kiangsi[3] Gan: Kongsi) is a province in the People's Republic of China, located in the southeast of the country
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Zhaoqing
Zhaoqing, formerly romanized as Shiuhing,[a] is a prefecture-level city in Guangdong
Guangdong
Province, China. During the 2010 census, its population was 3,918,467, with 1,232,462 living in the urbanized areas of Duanzhou District
Duanzhou District
and Gaoyao
Gaoyao
County.[1] The prefectural seat—excluding Seven Star Crags—is fairly flat, but thickly forested mountains lie just outside its limits. Numerous rice paddies and aquaculture ponds are found on the outskirts of the city. Sihui and the southern districts of the prefecture are considered part of the Pearl River Delta. Formerly one of the most important cities in southern China, Zhaoqing lost importance during the Qing and is now primarily known for tourism and as a provincial "college town". Residents from Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and the other cities of the Pearl River Delta
Pearl River Delta
visit it for weekend excursions
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Jiedushi
The jiedushi were regional military governors in China
China
during the Tang dynasty and the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The post of jiedushi has been translated as "military commissioner", "legate", or "regional commander". Originally introduced in 711 to counter external threats, the jiedushi were posts authorized with the supervision of a defense command often encompassing several prefectures, the ability to maintain their own armies, collect taxes and promote and appoint subordinates.[1] Powerful jiedushi eventually became fanzhen rulers (de facto warlords) and overrode the power of the central government. An early example of this was An Lushan, who was appointed jiedushi of three regions, which he used to start the An Lushan
An Lushan
Rebellion that abruptly ended the golden age of the Tang dynasty
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Guangdong
Guangdong
Guangdong
(Chinese: 广东) is a province in South China, located on the South China
South China
Sea coast. Traditionally romanised as Kwangtung, Guangdong
Guangdong
surpassed Henan
Henan
and Sichuan
Sichuan
to become the most populous province in China
China
in January 2005, registering 79.1 million permanent residents and 31 million migrants who lived in the province for at least six months of the year;[5][6] the total population was 104,303,132 in the 2010 census, accounting for 7.79 percent of Mainland China's population.[7] This also makes it the most populous first-level administrative subdivision of any country outside the former British Raj, as its population is surpassed only by those of the Pakistani province of Punjab[8] and the Indian states of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
and Uttar Pradesh[9]
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Crown Prince
A crown prince is the male heir apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. Its female form is crown princess, which may refer either to an heir apparent or, especially in earlier times, the wife of the person styled crown prince.[citation needed] Crown prince
Crown prince
as a descriptive term has been used throughout history for the prince being first in line to a throne and is expected to succeed (i.e. the heir apparent) barring any unforeseen future event preventing this. In certain monarchies, a more specific substantive title may be accorded and become associated with the position of heir apparent (e.g. Prince of Asturias
Prince of Asturias
in Spain, Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
in the United Kingdom)
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Jiujiang
Jiujiang
Jiujiang
(Chinese: 九江), formerly transliterated Kiukiang[1] or Kew Keang, is a prefecture-level city located on the southern shores of the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
in northwest Jiangxi
Jiangxi
Province, People's Republic of China. It is the second-largest prefecture-level city in Jiangxi province after the provincial capital Nanchang. Jiujiang
Jiujiang
literally means "nine rivers". Its population was 4,728,778 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 704,986 in the built up area made of 2 urban districts (Xunyang and Lianxi)
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Chuzhou
Chuzhou
Chuzhou
(Chinese: 滁州; pinyin: Chúzhōu) is a prefecture-level city in eastern Anhui
Anhui
Province, China. It borders the provincial capital of Hefei
Hefei
to the southwest, Huainan
Huainan
to the west, Bengbu
Bengbu
to the northwest, Chaohu
Chaohu
to the south, and the province of Jiangsu
Jiangsu
to the east
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Anhui
Anhui
Anhui
([án.xwéi]; Chinese: 安徽) is a province of the People's Republic of China
China
located in the eastern region of the country. The province is located across the basins of the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
and the Huai River, bordering Jiangsu
Jiangsu
to the east, Zhejiang
Zhejiang
to the southeast, Jiangxi
Jiangxi
to the south, Hubei
Hubei
to the southwest, Henan
Henan
to the northwest, and Shandong
Shandong
for a short section in the north. Anhui
Anhui
is the 22nd largest Chinese province based on area, the 8th most populous, and the 12th most densely-populated region of all 34 Chinese provincial regions
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