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Lhotse Shar
Lhotse
Lhotse
Shar is a subsidiary mountain of Lhotse, and the 11th-highest mountain on Earth, at 8,383 m (27,503 ft) high. It has the highest fatality rate of all the eight-thousanders – for every 2 people who summit the mountain, one person dies attempting to.[1] However, this is primarily because most climbers tend to try to ascend to the primary peak of Lhotse, rather than the lowest summit of the mountain. It was first climbed by Sepp Mayerl and Rolf Walter on May 12, 1970. On April 27, 1980, Nicolas Jaeger was seen for the last time at 8,200 metres (26,900 ft) altitude during an attempted ascent of Lhotse Shar in Nepal, and is presumed dead.[2] References[edit]^ " Lhotse
Lhotse
Shar 8400 metres". EverestNews. Retrieved October 7, 2015.  ^ Buffet, Charlie (20 March 2005). " Nicolas Jaeger au pays de l'oxygène rare" (in French). Le Monde
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Tibet Autonomous Region
The Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region (TAR) or Xizang Autonomous Region, called Tibet
Tibet
or Xizang for short (Chinese: 西藏; pinyin: Xīzàng; literally: "Western Tsang"; Mandarin: [ɕí.tsâŋ]; Tibetan: བོད་, Wylie: Bod, ZYPY: Poi, IPA: [pʰø̀ʔ]), is a province-level autonomous region of the People's Republic of China (PRC). It was formally established in 1965 to replace the Tibet
Tibet
Area, an administrative division the PRC inherited from the Republic of China
China
(ROC), about 5 years after the dismissal of the Kashag
Kashag
by the PRC following the 1959 Tibetan uprising, and about 13 years from the Tibet's incorporation into the PRC in 1951. The current borders of the Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region were generally established in the eighteenth century[4] and include about half of ethno-cultural Tibet
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Topographic Prominence
In topography, prominence[a] characterizes the height of a mountain or hill's summit by the vertical distance between it and the lowest contour line encircling it but containing no higher summit within it. It is a measure of the independence of a summit. A peak's key col is a unique point on this contour line and the parent peak is some higher mountain, selected according to various objective criteria.Contents1 Definitions 2 Illustration 3 In mountaineering 4 Parent peak4.1 Encirclement or island parentage 4.2 Prominence parentage 4.3 Line parentage 4.4 Other criteria5 Issues in choice of summit and key col 6 Interesting prominence situations 7 Calculations and mathematics 8 Wet prominence and dry prominence 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksDefinitions[edit]Figure 1. Vertical arrows show the topographic prominence of three peaks on an island. The dashed horizontal lines show the lowest contours that do not encircle higher peaks
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Le Monde
Le Monde
Le Monde
(French pronunciation: ​[lə mɔ̃d]; English: The World) is a French daily afternoon newspaper founded by Hubert Beuve-Méry at the request of Charles de Gaulle
Charles de Gaulle
(as Chairman of the Provisional Government of the French Republic) on 19 December 1944, shortly after the Liberation of Paris, and published continuously since its first edition. It is one of the most important and widely respected newspapers in the world.[3] It is one of two French newspapers of record along with Le Figaro, and the main publication of La Vie- Le Monde
Le Monde
Group. It reported an average circulation of 323,039 copies per issue in 2009, about 40,000 of which were sold abroad. It has had its own website since 19 December 1995, and is often the only French newspaper easily obtainable in non-French-speaking countries
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Earth
Earth
Earth
is the third planet from the Sun
Sun
and the only object in the Universe
Universe
known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other sources of evidence, Earth
Earth
formed over 4.5 billion years ago.[24][25][26] Earth's gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun
Sun
and the Moon, Earth's only natural satellite. Earth
Earth
revolves around the Sun
Sun
in 365.26 days, a period known as an Earth
Earth
year
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List Of Highest Mountains
There are at least 109 mountains on Earth
Earth
with elevations greater than 7,200 metres (23,622 ft) above sea level. The vast majority of these mountains are located on the edge of the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
and Tibet, with some peaks in Central Asia. Only those summits are included that, by an objective measure, may be considered individual mountains as opposed to subsidiary peaks.Contents1 Considerations 2 Geographical distribution 3 List 4 Data plots4.1 By country 4.2 Stem and leaf plot5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksConsiderations[edit]Figure demonstrating the concept of topographic prominence: The prominence of a peak is the height of the peak’s summit above the lowest contour line encircling it and no higher summit. For example, vertical arrows show the topographic prominence of three peaks on an island
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Mahalangur Himal
Mahālangūr Himāl (Nepali: महालङ्गूर हिमाल, Mahālaṅgūra himāla) is a section of the Himalayas
Himalayas
in northeast Nepal
Nepal
and south-central Tibet
Tibet
of China extending east from the pass Nangpa La
Nangpa La
between Rolwaling Himal
Rolwaling Himal
and Cho Oyu, to the Arun River.[1] It includes Mount Everest, Lhotse, Makalu, and Cho Oyu
Cho Oyu
— four of Earth's six highest peaks. On the Tibetan side it is drained by the Rongbuk and Kangshung Glaciers and on the Nepali side by Barun, Ngojumba and Khumbu
Khumbu
Glaciers and others
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Mountain Range
A mountain range or hill range is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A mountain system or mountain belt is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny.[1] Mountain
Mountain
ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth
Earth
are the result of plate tectonics. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System
Solar System
and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys. Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology
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First Ascent
In mountaineering, a first ascent (abbreviated to FA in guidebooks) is the first successful, documented attainment of the top of a mountain, or the first to follow a particular climbing route. First mountain ascents are notable because they entail genuine exploration, with greater risks, challenges, and recognition than climbing a route pioneered by others. The person who performs the first ascent is called the first ascensionist. In free climbing, a first ascent (or first free ascent, abbreviated FFA) of a climbing route is the first successful, documented climb of a route without using equipment such as anchors or ropes for aiding progression or resting.Contents1 History 2 Related terms 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The details of the first ascents of even many prominent mountains are scanty or unknown; sometimes the only evidence of prior summiting is a cairn, artifacts, or inscriptions at the top
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People's Republic Of China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Topographic Isolation
The topographic isolation of a summit is the minimum great-circle distance to a point of equal elevation, representing a radius of dominance in which the peak is the highest point
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Nepal
Nepal
Nepal
(/nəˈpɔːl/ ( listen);[12] Nepali: नेपाल  Nepāl [neˈpal]), officially the Federal Democratic Republic
Republic
of Nepal
Nepal
(Nepali: सङ्घीय लोकतान्त्रिक गणतन्त्र नेपाल Sanghiya Loktāntrik Ganatantra Nepāl),[13] is a landlocked country in South Asia
South Asia
located in the Himalaya. With an estimated population of 26.4 million, it is 48th largest country by population and 93rd largest country by area.[2][14] It borders China
China
in the north and India
India
in the south, east, and west while Bangladesh
Bangladesh
is located within only 27 km (17 mi) of its southeastern tip and Bhutan
Bhutan
is separated from it by the Indian state of Sikkim
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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List Of Mountain Lists
Perhaps the first of what would become many notable mountain lists around the world was Sir Hugh Munro’s catalog of the Munros, the peaks above 3,000’ in Scotland).[1] Once defined the list became a popular target for what became known as peak bagging, where the adventurous attempted to summit all of the peaks on the list.[2] Over time the peaks on such lists grew more challenging
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Khumbu
Khumbu
Khumbu
(also known as the Everest Region)[1] is a region of northeastern Nepal
Nepal
on the Nepalese side of Mount Everest. It is part of the Solukhumbu District, which in turn is part of the Sagarmatha Zone.[2] Khumbu
Khumbu
is one of three subregions of the main Khambu (specially Kulung) and Sherpa settlement of the Himalaya, the other two being Solu and Pharak. It includes the town of Namche Bazaar
Namche Bazaar
as well as the villages of Thame, Khumjung, Pangboche, Pheriche
Pheriche
and Kunde
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