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Levite
A Levite or Levi
Levi
(/ˈliːvaɪt/, Hebrew: לֵוִי‬, Modern Levi, Tiberian Lēwî) is a Jewish male whose descent is traced by tradition to Levi.[1] In Jewish tradition, a Levite is a member of the Israelite Tribe of Levi, descended from Levi, the third son of Jacob and Leah. As a surname, Levite status may be indicated by the term HaLevi, which consists of the Hebrew
Hebrew
prefix "ה" Ha- ("the") plus Levi
Levi
(Levite). The daughter of a Levite is a "Bat Levi" (Bat being Hebrew
Hebrew
for "daughter"). The Tribe of Levi
Tribe of Levi
served particular religious duties for the Israelites
Israelites
and had political responsibilities as well. In return, the landed tribes were expected to give tithe to support the Levites,[2] particularly the tithe known as the 'Maaser Rishon'
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic groups (2017)74.7% Jewish 20.8% Arab 4.5% other[5]Religion (2016)74.7% Jewish 17.7% Muslim
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Halacha
Halakha (/hɑːˈlɔːxə/;[1] Hebrew: הֲלָכָה‬, Sephardic: [halaˈχa]; also transliterated as halacha, halakhah, halachah or halocho) (Ashkenazic: [haˈloχo]) is the collective body of Jewish religious laws derived from the Written and Oral Torah. It is based on biblical laws or "commandments" (mitzvot) (traditionally numbered as 613), subsequent Talmudic and rabbinic law and the customs and traditions compiled in the many books, one of the most famous of which is the 16th-century Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(literally "Prepared Table"). Halakha is often translated as " Jewish
Jewish
Law", although a more literal translation might be "the way to behave" or "the way of walking". The word derives from the root that means "to behave" (also "to go" or "to walk")
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Landed Tribe
In real estate, a landed property or landed estate is a property that generates income for the owner without the owner having to do the actual work of the estate. In medieval Western Europe, there were two competing systems of landed property, on one hand manoralism, inherited from the Roman villa system, where a large estate is owned by the Lord of the Manor and leased to tenants, and on the other hand the family farm or Hof owned by and heritable within a commoner family (c.f. yeoman), inherited from Germanic law. A gentleman farmer is the largely historic term for a country gentleman who has a farm as part of his estate and farms mainly for pleasure rather than for profit.[1][2] His acreage may vary from under ten to hundreds of acres. The gentleman farmer employed labourers and farm managers
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Orthodox Judaism
Orthodox Judaism
Judaism
is the branch of religious Judaism
Judaism
which subscribes to a tradition of mass revelation, and adheres to the interpretation and application of the laws and ethics of the Torah, as legislated in the Talmudic texts by the Tannaim and Amoraim
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Conservative Judaism
Conservative Judaism
Judaism
(known as Masorti Judaism
Judaism
outside North America) is a major Jewish denomination, which views Jewish Law, or Halakha, as both binding and subject to historical development. The Conservative rabbinate therefore employs modern historical-critical research, rather than only traditional methods and sources, and lends great weight to its constituency when determining its stance on matters of Law. The movement considers its approach as the authentic and most appropriate continuation of halakhic discourse, maintaining both fealty to received forms and flexibility in their interpretation
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Reconstructionist Judaism
Reconstructionist Judaism
Judaism
(Hebrew: יהדות רקונסטרוקציוניסטית‬, yahadút rekonstruktsyonistit, or יהדות מתחדשת‬, yahadút mitkhadéshet) is a modern Jewish movement that views Judaism
Judaism
as a progressively evolving civilization and is based on the conceptions developed by Mordecai Kaplan (1881–1983). The movement originated as a semi-organized stream within Conservative Judaism
Conservative Judaism
and developed from the late 1920s to 1940s, before it seceded in 1955[1] and established a rabbinical college in 1967.[2] There is substantial theological diversity within the movement. Halakha, the collective body of Jewish Law, is not considered binding, but is treated as a valuable cultural remnant that should be upheld unless there is reason for the contrary
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Reform Judaism
Reform Judaism
Judaism
(also known as Liberal Judaism
Judaism
or Progressive Judaism) is a major Jewish denomination that emphasizes the evolving nature of the faith, the superiority of its ethical aspects to the ceremonial ones, and a belief in a continuous revelation not centered on the theophany at Mount Sinai. A liberal strand of Judaism, it is characterized by a lesser stress on ritual and personal observance, regarding Jewish Law as non-binding and the individual Jew as autonomous, and openness to external influences and progressive values
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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Jacob (Bible)
Jacob (/ˈdʒeɪkəb/; Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב‬, Modern  Ya‘aqōv (help·info), Tiberian Yā‘āqōḇ), later given the name Israel, is regarded as a Patriarch of the Israelites. According to the Book of Genesis, Jacob was the third Hebrew progenitor with whom God made a covenant. He is the son of Isaac and Rebecca, the grandson of Abraham, Sarah and Bethuel, the nephew of Ishmael, and the younger twin brother of Esau. Jacob had twelve sons and at least one daughter, by his two wives, Leah and Rachel, and by their handmaidens Bilhah and Zilpah. Jacob's twelve sons, named in Genesis, were Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin. His only daughter mentioned in Genesis is Dinah. The twelve sons became the progenitors of the "Tribes of Israel".[1]Jacob's Dream statue and display on the campus of Abilene Christian University
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Baal
Baal
Baal
(/ˈbeɪ.əl/),[1][a] properly Baʿal,[b] was a title and honorific meaning "lord" in the Northwest Semitic languages
Northwest Semitic languages
spoken in the Levant
Levant
during antiquity. From its use among people, it came to be applied to gods.[7] Scholars previously associated the theonym with solar cults and with a variety of unrelated patron deities, but inscriptions have shown that the name Baʿal was particularly associated with the storm and fertility god Hadad
Hadad
and his local manifestations.[8] The Hebrew Bible, compiled and curated over a span of centuries, includes early use of the term in reference to God
God
(known to them as Yahweh), generic use in reference to various Levantine deities, and finally pointed application towards Hadad, who was decried as a false god
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Jewish Holidays
Jewish holidays, also known as Jewish festivals or Yamim Tovim (ימים טובים, "Good Days", or singular יום טוב Yom Tov, in transliterated Hebrew [English: /ˈjɔːm ˈtɔːv, joʊm ˈtoʊv/]),[1] are holidays observed in Judaism
Judaism
and by Jews[Note 1] throughout the Hebrew calendar
Hebrew calendar
and include religious, cultural and national elements, derived from three sources: Biblical mitzvot ("commandments"); rabbinic mandates; Jewish history
Jewish history
and the history of the State of Israel. Jewish holidays
Jewish holidays
occur on the same dates every year in the Hebrew calendar, but the dates vary in the Gregorian
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Rishonim
Rishonim (Hebrew: [ʁiʃoˈnim]; Hebrew: ראשונים‎; sing. ראשון, Rishon, "the first ones") were the leading rabbis and poskim who lived approximately during the 11th to 15th centuries, in the era before the writing of the Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(Hebrew: שׁוּלחָן עָרוּך, "Set Table", a common printed code of Jewish law, 1563 CE) and following the Geonim (589-1038 CE). Rabbinic scholars subsequent to the Shulkhan Arukh are generally known as acharonim ("the latter ones"). The distinction between the rishonim and the geonim is meaningful historically; in halakha (Jewish Law) the distinction is less important. According to a widely held view in Orthodox Judaism, the acharonim generally cannot dispute the rulings of rabbis of previous eras unless they find support from other rabbis in previous eras
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Aliyah
Aliyah
Aliyah
(US: /ˌælɪˈɑː/, UK: /ˌɑːli-/; Hebrew: עֲלִיָּה‬ aliyah, "ascent") is the immigration of Jews
Jews
from the diaspora to the Land of Israel
Land of Israel
(Eretz Israel
Israel
in Hebrew). Also defined as "the act of going up"—that is, towards Jerusalem—"making Aliyah" by moving to the Land of Israel
Land of Israel
is one of the most basic tenets of Zionism
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