HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Levee
A levee (/ˈlɛvi/),[1][2] dike, dyke, embankment, floodbank or stopbank is an elongated naturally occurring ridge or artificially constructed fill or wall, which regulates water levels. It is usually earthen and often parallel to the course of a river in its floodplain or along low-lying coastlines.[3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Uses2.1 River
River
flood prevention 2.2 Coastal flood prevention 2.3 Spur dykes or groynes3 Natural examples 4 Failures and breaches 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Speakers of American English
American English
(notably in the Midwest
Midwest
and Deep South), use the word levee, from the French word levée (from the feminine past participle of the French verb
French verb
lever, "to raise")
[...More...]

"Levee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mediterranean
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
[...More...]

"Mediterranean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Countryside
In general, a rural area or countryside is a geographic area that is located outside towns and cities.[1] The Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services defines the word rural as encompassing "...all population, housing, and territory not included within an urban area. Whatever is not urban is considered rural."[2] Typical rural areas have a low population density and small settlements. Agricultural areas are commonly rural, as are other types of areas such as forest
[...More...]

"Countryside" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lincolnshire
Coordinates: 53°4′N 0°11′W / 53.067°N 0.183°W / 53.067; -0.183LincolnshireCountyFlagMotto: Land and God Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
in EnglandSovereign state United KingdomCountry EnglandRegion East Midlands Yorkshire and the Humber
[...More...]

"Lincolnshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bourne, Lincolnshire
Bourne is an English market town and civil parish in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire
[...More...]

"Bourne, Lincolnshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

River Glen, Lincolnshire
The River
River
Glen is a river in Lincolnshire, England
England
with a short stretch passing through Rutland
Rutland
near Essendine. The river's name appears to derive from a Brythonic Celtic language but there is a strong early English connection.Contents1 Naming 2 Course 3 History 4 Development 5 Points of interest 6 See also 7 References7.1 Bibliography8 External linksNaming[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)In the language of the Ancient Britons, which survives today as Welsh, Cornish and Breton, the neighbouring rivers, the Glen and the Welland seem to have been given contrasting names
[...More...]

"River Glen, Lincolnshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Norfolk
Norfolk (/ˈnɔːrfək/) is a county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the northwest, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and, to the north-west, The Wash. The county town is Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile (155 per km²). Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000).[4] The Broads is a network of rivers and lakes in the east of the county, extending south into Suffolk. The area is not a national park[5] although it is marketed as such
[...More...]

"Norfolk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
(/ˈsʌfək/) is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk
Norfolk
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the west and Essex
Essex
to the south. The North Sea
North Sea
lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.[2] The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of the Broads in the north
[...More...]

"Suffolk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Broads
The Broads
The Broads
National Park is a network of mostly navigable rivers and lakes in the English counties of Norfolk
Norfolk
and Suffolk. The lakes, known as broads, were formed by the flooding of peat workings. The Broads, and some surrounding land, were constituted as a special area with a level of protection similar to a national park by the Norfolk
Norfolk
and Suffolk
Suffolk
Broads Act 1988. The Broads
The Broads
Authority, a special statutory authority responsible for managing the area, became operational in 1989.[1] The area is 303 square kilometres (117 sq mi), most of which is in Norfolk, with over 200 kilometres (120 mi) of navigable waterways. There are seven rivers and 63 broads, mostly less than 4 metres (13 ft) deep. Thirteen broads are generally open to navigation, with a further three having navigable channels
[...More...]

"The Broads" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
[...More...]

"United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
[...More...]

"Scotland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dry Stone
Dry stone, sometimes called drystack or, in Scotland, drystane, is a building method by which structures are constructed from stones without any mortar to bind them together.[1] Dry stone
Dry stone
structures are stable because of their unique construction method, which is characterized by the presence of a load-bearing façade of carefully selected interlocking stones. Dry stone
[...More...]

"Dry Stone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polder
A polder (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈpɔldər] ( listen)) is a low-lying tract of land enclosed by dikes that forms an artificial hydrological entity, meaning it has no connection with outside water other than through manually operated devices. There are three types of polder:Land reclaimed from a body of water, such as a lake or the sea bed Flood plains separated from the sea or river by a dike Marshes
Marshes
separated from the surrounding water by a dike and subsequently drained; these are also known as koogs especially in GermanyThe ground level in drained marshes subsides over time. All polders will eventually be below the surrounding water level some or all of the time. Water enters the low-lying polder through infiltration and water pressure of ground water, or rainfall, or transport of water by rivers and canals
[...More...]

"Polder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ditch
A ditch is a small to moderate depression created to channel water. A ditch can be used for drainage, to drain water from low-lying areas, alongside roadways or fields, or to channel water from a more distant source for plant irrigation. Ditches are commonly seen around farmland, especially in areas that have required drainage, such as The Fens in eastern England
England
and much of the Netherlands. Roadside ditches may provide a hazard to motorists and cyclists, whose vehicles may crash into them and get damaged, flipped over or stuck, especially in poor weather conditions, and in rural areas. In Anglo-Saxon, the word dïc already existed and was pronounced "deek" in northern England
England
and "deetch" in the south. The origins of the word lie in digging a trench and forming the upcast soil into a bank alongside it
[...More...]

"Ditch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fortification
Fortifications are military constructions, or buildings, designed for the defense of territories in warfare and also used to solidify rule in a region during peace time. For many thousands of years, humans have constructed defensive works in a variety of increasingly complex designs. The term is derived from the Latin
Latin
fortis ("strong") and facere ("to make"). From very early history to modern times, walls have often been necessary for cities to survive in an ever-changing world of invasion and conquest. Some settlements in the Indus Valley Civilization
Indus Valley Civilization
were the first small cities to be fortified. In ancient Greece, large stone walls had been built in Mycenaean Greece, such as the ancient site of Mycenae
Mycenae
(famous for the huge stone blocks of its 'cyclopean' walls)
[...More...]

"Fortification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dry-stone Wall
Dry stone, sometimes called drystack or, in Scotland, drystane, is a building method by which structures are constructed from stones without any mortar to bind them together.[1] Dry stone
Dry stone
structures are stable because of their unique construction method, which is characterized by the presence of a load-bearing façade of carefully selected interlocking stones. Dry stone
[...More...]

"Dry-stone Wall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.