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Les Diaboliques (book)
Les Diaboliques (The She-Devils) is a collection of short stories written by Barbey d'Aurevilly and published in France
France
in 1874. Each story features a woman who commits an act of violence, or revenge, or some other crime. It is considered d'Aurevilly's masterpiece.[1] D'Aurevilly, due to the boredom induced by bourgeois life in the Second French Republic, was a dandy. Similarly, the acts committed by the characters in these stories are induced not only by their extreme passion but also by their boredom. Some of the characters spend hours playing whist while others take delight in wearing fine clothes
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Les Diaboliques (short Story Collection)
Les Diaboliques (The She-Devils) is a collection of short stories written by Barbey d'Aurevilly and published in France in 1874. Each story features a woman who commits an act of violence, or revenge, or some other crime. It is considered d'Aurevilly's masterpiece.[1] D'Aurevilly, due to the boredom induced by bourgeois life in the Second French Republic, was a dandy. Similarly, the acts committed by the characters in these stories are induced not only by their extreme passion but also by their boredom. Some of the characters spend hours playing whist while others take delight in wearing fine clothes
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Blasphemy
Blasphemy
Blasphemy
is the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence to a deity, to religious or holy persons or sacred things, or toward something considered sacred or inviolable.[1][2][3][4] Some religions consider blasphemy to be a religious crime.[5] As of 2012, anti-blasphemy laws existed in 32 countries, while 87 nations had hate speech laws that covered defamation of religion and public expression of hate against a religious group.[6] Anti-blasphemy laws are particularly common in Muslim-majority nations, such as those in the Middle East and North Africa,[6] alth
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Carmelo Bene
Carmelo Bene
Carmelo Bene
(1 September 1937 – 16 March 2002) was an Italian actor, poet, film director and screenwriter. He was an important exponent of the Italian avant-garde theatre and cinema.[1]Contents1 Works1.1 Literature 1.2 Selected filmography2 See also 3 References 4 External linksWorks[edit] Literature[edit] In 1979 he wrote, in collaboration with French philosopher Gilles Deleuze, the essay "Superpositions". In 1984 his play Adelchi was published
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Alexandre Astruc
Alexandre Astruc
Alexandre Astruc
(French: [astʁyk]; 13 July 1923 – 19 May 2016) was a French film critic and film director.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Selected filmography 3 Publications 4 References4.1 Bibliography5 External linksBiography[edit] Before becoming a film director he was a journalist, novelist and film critic.[2] His contribution to the auteur theory centers on his notion of the caméra-stylo or "camera-pen" and the idea that directors should wield their cameras like writers use their pens.[3][4] In 1994 he was awarded the
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The Crimson Curtain (1953 Film)
The Crimson Curtain (French: Le Rideau cramoisi) is a 1953 French short film directed by Alexandre Astruc. It was screened at the 1952 Cannes Film Festival, but not entered into the competition.[1][2]Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 References 4 External linksPlot[edit] A young military officer is a tenant in the house of wealthy citizens. He admires their daughter, who eventually makes his dreams come true by spending the night with him. They have a secret love affair. But as surprisingly as she indulged him, she dies in his arms. Desperate, the officer rides away. Cast[edit] Anouk Aimée
Anouk Aimée
as Albertine Marguerite Garcya as Albertine's mother Jim Gérald as Albertine's father Jean-Claude Pascal as the officerReferences[edit]^ "Festival de Cannes: The Crimson Curtain". festival-cannes.com. Retrieved 2009-01-19.  ^ "Rideau cramoisi (Le)". unifrance.org
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Robert Wiene
Robert Wiene
Robert Wiene
(German: [ˈviːnə]; 27 April 1873 – 17 July 1938) was a film director of the German silent cinema. He is particularly known for directing the German silent film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
and a succession of other expressionist films. Wiene also directed a variety of other films of varying styles and genres. Following the Nazi
Nazi
rise to power in Germany, Wiene, who was of Jewish
Jewish
descent,[1] fled into exile. Early life Robert Wiene
Robert Wiene
was born in Breslau,[2] as the elder son of the successful theatre actor Carl Wiene. His younger brother Conrad also became an actor, but Robert Wiene
Robert Wiene
at first studied law at the University of Berlin. In 1908 he also started to act, at first in small parts on stage
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A Woman's Revenge (1921 Film)
A Woman's Revenge (German: Die Rache einer Frau) is a 1921 German silent drama film directed by Robert Wiene
Robert Wiene
and starring Vera Karalli, Franz Egenieff and Olga Engl. In order to punish her cold, brutal aristocratic husband for murdering her lover, a woman becomes a common prostitute to shame him.[1] The film received largely negative reviews.[2]Contents1 Cast 2 References 3 Bibliography 4 External linksCast[edit]Vera Karalli Franz Egenieff - Herzog von Sierra-Leone Olga Engl Margarete Kupfer Alfred Haase Boris Michailow - Geliebter der Herzogin Auguste Prasch-GrevenbergReferences[edit]^ Jung & Schatzberg p.88-89 ^ Jung & Schatzberg p.91-92Bibliography[edit]Jung, Uli & Schatzberg, Walter. Beyond Caligari: The Films of Robert Wiene
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Dedalus Books
Dedalus Books is a British publishing company specialising in European literature. As stated on their website, Dedalus specialises in "its own distinctive genre, which we term distorted reality, where the bizarre, the unusual and the grotesque and the surreal meld in a kind of intellectual fiction which is very European." Established by Geoffrey Smith, Eric Lane and Robert Irwin, Dedalus was launched on November 30, 1983 with the publication of three novels including Irwin's The Arabian Nightmare and Smith's vampire novel The Revenants (bylined "Geoffrey Farrington"). [2] Dedalus publishes novels and anthologies, featuring both contemporary and historical European works. Dedalus publishes both translations and original English language works
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Obscenity
An obscenity is any utterance or act that strongly offends the prevalent morality of the time.[1] It is derived from the Latin obscaena (offstage) a cognate of the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
root skene, because some potentially offensive content, such as murder or sex, was depicted offstage in classical drama. The word can be used to indicate a strong moral repugnance, in expressions such as "obscene profits" or "the obscenity of war".Contents1 United States
United States
obscenity law1.1 Non image-based obscenity cases in the U.S. 1.2 Key U.S
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Public Morality
Public morality
Public morality
refers to moral and ethical standards enforced in a society, by law or police work or social pressure, and applied to public life, to the content of the media, and to conduct in public places. A famous remark of Mrs Patrick Campbell, that she did not care what people did as long as they "didn't frighten the horses" shows that in some sense even high tolerance expects a public limitation on behaviour (sexual conduct is implied here). At the opposite extreme a theocracy may equate public morality with religious instruction, and give both the equal force of law. Public morality
Public morality
often means regulation of sexual matters, including prostitution and homosexuality, but also matters of dress and nudity, pornography, acceptability in social terms of cohabitation before marriage, and the protection of children
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Contentin Peninsula
The Cotentin Peninsula
Peninsula
(French pronunciation: ​[kotɑ̃tɛ̃]), also known as the Cherbourg
Cherbourg
Peninsula, is a peninsula in Normandy
Normandy
that forms part of the northwest coast of France. It extends north-westward into the English Channel, towards Great Britain. To its west lie the Channel Islands
Channel Islands
and to the southwest lies the Brittany
Brittany
Peninsula. The peninsula lies wholly within the department of Manche, in the region of Normandy.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Roman Armorica 2.2 Medieval history 2.3 Modern history3 Economy 4 Culture 5 References 6 Other sourcesGeography[edit] The Cotentin peninsula is part of the Armorican Massif[1] (with the exception of the Plain lying in the Paris Basin) and lies between the estuary of the Vire river and Mont Saint-Michel
Mont Saint-Michel
Bay
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Fencing
Fencing
Fencing
is a group of three related combat sports. The three disciplines in modern fencing are the foil, the épée, and the sabre; winning points are made through the contact with an opponent. A fourth discipline, singlestick, appeared in the 1904 Olympics but was dropped after that, and is not a part of modern fencing. Fencing
Fencing
was one of the first sports to be played in the Olympics. Based on the traditional skills of swordsmanship, the modern sport arose at the end of the 19th century, with the Italian school having modified the historical European martial art of classical fencing, and the French school later refining the Italian system. There are three forms of modern fencing, each uses a different kind of weapon and has different rules, this way the sport itself is divided into three competitive scenes: foil, épée, and sabre
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