HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Leophron
LEOPHRON was the son of Anaxilas , tyrant of Rhegium and Messana . According to Dionysius of Halicarnassus
Dionysius of Halicarnassus
, he succeeded his father in the sovereign power. It is therefore probable that he was the eldest of the two sons of Anaxilas, in whose name Micythus assumed the sovereignty, and who afterwards, at the instigation of Hieron of Syracuse , dispossessed the latter of his authority. Diodorus , from whom we learn these facts, does not mention the name of either of the young princes. According to the same author, their reign lasted six years (467-461 BC), when they were expelled by a popular insurrection both from Rhegium and Zancle . Leophron
Leophron
is elsewhere mentioned as carrying on war against the neighbouring city of Locri
Locri
, and as displaying his magnificence at the Olympic games , by feasting the whole assembled multitude
[...More...]

"Leophron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William Smith (lexicographer)
SIR WILLIAM SMITH (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893) was an English lexicographer . CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Career * 2.1 Publications * 3 Honours and death * 4 Notes * 5 References * 6 External links EARLY LIFESmith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney. Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics , and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes. He was entered at Gray\'s Inn in 1830, but gave up his legal studies for a post at University College School and began to write on classical subjects. CAREERSmith next turned his attention to lexicography
[...More...]

"William Smith (lexicographer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Domain
The legal term PUBLIC DOMAIN refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable. For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven , and most of the early silent films , are all now in the public domain by either being created before copyrights existed or by their copyright term expiring. Examples for works not covered by copyright which are therefore in the public domain, are the formulae of Newtonian physics , cooking recipes , and all software before 1974. Examples for works actively dedicated into public domain by their authors are reference implementations of cryptographic algorithms , NIH 's ImageJ , and the CIA
CIA
's World Factbook
[...More...]

"Public Domain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Athenaeus
ATHENAEUS OF NAUCRATIS (/ˌæθəˈniːəs/ ; Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Ἀθήναιος Nαυκρατίτης or Nαυκράτιος, Athēnaios Naukratitēs or Naukratios; Latin : Athenaeus
Athenaeus
Naucratita) was a Greek rhetorician and grammarian, flourishing about the end of the 2nd and beginning of the 3rd century AD. The Suda
Suda
says only that he lived in the times of Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
, but the contempt with which he speaks of Commodus , who died in 192, shows that he survived that emperor. He was a contemporary of Adrantus . Several of his publications are lost, but the fifteen-volume Deipnosophistae mostly survives
[...More...]

"Athenaeus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology
The DICTIONARY OF GREEK AND ROMAN BIOGRAPHY AND MYTHOLOGY (1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia /biographical dictionary . Edited by William Smith , the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography . The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography . CONTENTS * 1 Authors and scope * 2 Use and availability today * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links AUTHORS AND SCOPE Excerpt from Philolaus
Philolaus
Pythagoras book, (Charles Peter Mason, 1870) The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles
[...More...]

"Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Running In Ancient Greece
Template:Multiple penie In Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
, the history of running can be traced back to 776 BC. Running
Running
was important to members of ancient Greek society, and is consistently highlighted in documents referencing the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
. The Olympic Games
Olympic Games
hosted a large variety of running events, each with their own set of rules. The ancient Greeks
Greeks
developed difficult training programs with specialized trainers in preparation for the Games. The training and competitive attitude of Greek athletes gives insight into how scientifically advanced Greece
Greece
was for the time period. The people of Greece
Greece
generally enjoyed sporting events, particularly foot racing, and wealthy admirers would often give large gifts to successful athletes
[...More...]

"Running In Ancient Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Damarchus
DAMARCHUS (Greek : Δάμαρχος) or DEMAENETUS was a victorious Olympic boxer from Parrhasia (Arcadia) who is said to have changed his shape into that of a wolf at the festival of Lycaea , only to become a man again after ten years. Pausanias investigated the story for his famous work Description of Greece and, while he seems to believe that Damarchus
Damarchus
the boxer did indeed exist, he notes Damarchus' inscription at Olympia mentions nothing about his supposed metamorphosis to a wolf. The festival of Lycaea involved human sacrifice to Zeus
Zeus
. A young boy was killed and then consumed by one of the participants, in this case by Damarchus, and as a result Zeus
Zeus
would transform the cannibal into a wolf
[...More...]

"Damarchus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bilistiche
BILISTICHE (Greek : Βιλιστίχη ) or BELISTICHE was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
courtesan of uncertain origin. According to Pausanias , she was a Macedonian ; according to Athenaeus
Athenaeus
, an Argive (which was an ancient Greek royal house and the ruling dynasty of Macedon ); according to Plutarch
Plutarch
, a foreign slave bought from the marketplace. She won the tethrippon and synoris horse races in the 264 BC Olympic Games . She became a mistress of Ptolemy II Philadelphus
Ptolemy II Philadelphus
and was deified by him as Aphrodite Bilistiche. According to Clement of Alexandria
Alexandria
, she was buried under the shrine of Sarapis in Alexandria
[...More...]

"Bilistiche" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aratus Of Sicyon
ARATUS (/əˈreɪtəs/ ; Greek : Ἄρατος; 271–213 BC) was a statesman of the ancient Greek city-state of Sicyon
Sicyon
and a leader of the Achaean League . He deposed the Sicyonian tyrant Nicocles in 251 BC. Aratus
Aratus
was an advocate of Greek unity and brought Sicyon
Sicyon
into the Achaean League , which he led to its maximum extent. He was elected strategos many times and led the Achaeans against Macedonia , the Aetolians
Aetolians
and the Spartans
[...More...]

"Aratus Of Sicyon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Justin (historian)
JUSTIN ( Latin
Latin
: Marcus Junianus Justinus Frontinus; c. second century) was a Latin
Latin
historian who lived under the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
. CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Works * 3 Legacy * 4 Notes * 5 References * 6 Bibliography * 7 External links LIFEAlmost nothing is known of Justin's personal history, his name appearing only in the title of his work. He must have lived after Gnaeus Pompeius Trogus , whose work he excerpted, and his references to the Romans and Parthians ' having divided the world between themselves would have been anachronistic after the rise of the Sassanians in the third century. His Latin
Latin
appears to be consistent with the style of the second century
[...More...]

"Justin (historian)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Herald And Trumpet Contest
In the 96th Olympiad (396 BC), beside the athletic and artistic competitions, the "HERALD AND TRUMPET CONTEST" was added, which was already a formal element of the Olympic ritual performed by the kerykes (heralds) and salpinktai (trumpeteers) . Winners were chosen by the clarity of the enunciation and the audibility of their voice or horn blast. Some notable victors were: * Timaeus (trumpeter) and Crates (herald) of Elis, the first ones. * Herodorus of Megara
Herodorus of Megara
(ten times) 328-292 BC trumpeter. * Diogenes of Ephesus 69-85 AD (five times) trumpeter. * Valerius Eclectus of Sinope 245,253-261 AD (four times) herald.REFERENCES * ^ Gymnikos, hippikos and mousikos agon (naked, equine and artistic contest) * Ancient Greek Athletics By Stephen G
[...More...]

"Herald And Trumpet Contest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reggio Calabria
REGGIO DI CALABRIA (Italian pronunciation: , also ; Sicilian-Calabrian dialect : Rìggiu, Italic-Greek of Bovesia : Righi, Ancient Greek : Ῥήγιον, Rhḗgion, Latin : Rhēgium), commonly known as REGGIO CALABRIA listen (help ·info ) or simply REGGIO in Southern Italy
Italy
, is the largest city and the most populated comune of Calabria
Calabria
, Southern Italy
Italy
. It is the capital of the Metropolitan City of Reggio Calabria
Calabria
and the seat of the Regional Council of Calabria. Reggio is located on the "toe" of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
and is separated from the island of Sicily
Sicily
by the Strait of Messina . It is situated on the slopes of the Aspromonte
Aspromonte
, a long, craggy mountain range that runs up through the centre of the region
[...More...]

"Reggio Calabria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Messina
MESSINA (/məˈsiːnə/ ; Italian pronunciation: ( listen ), Sicilian : Missina; Latin : Messana, Greek : Μεσσήνη) is the capital of the Italian Metropolitan City of Messina . It is the third-largest city on the island of Sicily , and the 13th-largest city in Italy, with a population of more than 238,000 inhabitants in the city proper and about 650,000 in the Metropolitan City. It is located near the northeast corner of Sicily, at the Strait of Messina , opposite Villa San Giovanni on the mainland, and has close ties with Reggio Calabria . According to Eurostat the FUA of the metropolitan area of Messina has, in 2014, 277,584 inhabitants. The city's main resources are its seaports (commercial and military shipyards), cruise tourism, commerce, and agriculture (wine production and cultivating lemons, oranges, mandarin oranges , and olives)
[...More...]

"Messina" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Micythus
MICYTHUS, son of Choerus, was a tyrant of Rhegium (modern Reggio Calabria ) in the 5th century BC. He was at first a slave in the service of Anaxilas , tyrant of Rhegium, but gradually rose to so high a place in the confidence of his master, that Anaxilas at his death (476 BC) left him guardian of his infant sons, with charge to hold the sovereign power in trust for them, until they should attain to manhood. The administration of Micythus appears to have been both wise and vigorous, so that he conciliated the affections of his subjects, and held the government both of Rhegium and Messana , undisturbed by any popular commotions
[...More...]

"Micythus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Simonides
SIMONIDES OF CEOS (/saɪˈmɒnɪˌdiːz/ ; Greek : Σιμωνίδης ὁ Κεῖος; c. 556 – 468 BC) was a Greek lyric poet , born at Ioulis on Ceos . The scholars of Hellenistic
Hellenistic
Alexandria
Alexandria
included him in the canonical list of nine lyric poets , along with Bacchylides (his nephew) and Pindar
Pindar
(reputedly a bitter rival). Both Bacchylides and Pindar
Pindar
benefited from his innovative approach to lyric poetry, and he was more involved than either of them in the major events and personalities of their times. His fame owes much to traditional accounts of his colourful life, as one of the wisest of men, as a greedy miser, as an inventor of a system of mnemonics and also of some letters of the Greek alphabet (ω, η, ξ, ψ)
[...More...]

"Simonides" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dionysius Of Halicarnassus
DIONYSIUS OF HALICARNASSUS (Greek : Διονύσιος Αλεξάνδρου Αλικαρνασσεύς Dionysios Alexandrou Alikarnassefs; "Dionysios son of Alexandros of Halikarnassos"; c. 60 BC – after 7 BC) was a Greek historian and teacher of rhetoric , who flourished during the reign of Caesar Augustus
Augustus
. His literary style was Atticistic — imitating Classical Attic Greek in its prime. Dionysius' opinion of the necessity of a promotion of paideia within education, from true knowledge of Classical sources , endured for centuries in a form integral to the identity of the Greek elite
[...More...]

"Dionysius Of Halicarnassus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.