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Leone Leoni
Leone Leoni
Leone Leoni
(ca. 1509 – 22 July 1590) was an Italian sculptor of international outlook who travelled in Italy, Germany, Austria, France, Spain and the Netherlands. Leoni is regarded as the finest of the Cinquecento medallists.[1] He made his reputation in commissions he received from the Habsburg
Habsburg
monarchs Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and Philip II of Spain. His usual medium was bronze, although he also worked in marble and alabaster, carved gemstones and probably left some finished work in wax (in which many of his sculptures were modelled), as well as designing coins
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Herma
A herma (Ancient Greek: ἑρμῆς, pl. ἑρμαῖ hermai),[1] commonly in English herm, is a sculpture with a head, and perhaps a torso, above a plain, usually squared lower section, on which male genitals may also be carved at the appropriate height. The form originated in Ancient Greece, and was adopted by the Romans, and revived at the Renaissance
Renaissance
in the form of term figures and Atlantes.Contents1 Origin 2 Uses 3 Trial of Alcibiades 4 Art and popular culture 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOrigin[edit] In the earliest times Greek divinities were worshiped in the form of a heap of stones or a shapeless column of stone or wood. In many parts of Greece there were piles of stones by the sides of roads, especially at their crossings, and on the boundaries of lands
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Counterfeit
To counterfeit means to imitate something. Counterfeit
Counterfeit
products are fakes or unauthorized replicas of the real product. Counterfeit products are often produced with the intent to take advantage of the superior value of the imitated product. The word counterfeit frequently describes both the forgeries of currency and documents, as well as the imitations of items such as clothing, handbags, shoes, pharmaceuticals, aviation and automobile parts, watches, electronics (both parts and finished products), software, works of art, toys, and movies.[1] Counterfeit
Counterfeit
products tend to have fake company logos and brands (resulting in patent or trademark infringement in the case of goods), have a reputation for being lower quality (sometimes not working at all) and may even include toxic elements such as lead
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Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni or more commonly known by his first name Michelangelo
Michelangelo
(/ˌmaɪkəlˈændʒəloʊ/; Italian: [mikeˈlandʒelo di lodoˈviːko
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Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
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Giambologna
Giambologna
Giambologna
(1529 – 13 August 1608) — born Jean Boulogne (and incorrectly known as Giovanni da Bologna or Giovanni Bologna) — was a Flemish sculptor based in Italy, celebrated for his marble and bronze statuary in a late Renaissance
Renaissance
or Mannerist
Mannerist
style.Contents1 Biography 2 Work 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksBiography[edit] Giambologna
Giambologna
was born in Douai, Flanders (now in Belgium), in 1529. After youthful studies in Antwerp with the architect-sculptor Jacques du Broeucq,[1] he moved to Italy
Italy
in 1550 and studied in Rome, making a detailed study of the sculpture of classical antiquity. He was also much influenced by Michelangelo, but developed his own Mannerist style, with perhaps less emphasis on emotion and more emphasis on refined surfaces, cool elegance, and beauty
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Bishop Of Arras
Diocese
Diocese
of Arras
Arras
(–Boulogne–Saint-Omer) Dioecesis Atrebatensis (–Bononiena–Audomarensis) Diocèse d' Arras
Arras
(–Boulogne–Saint-Omer) Arras
Arras
CathedralLocationCountry  FranceEcclesiastical province LilleMetropolitan Archdiocese of LilleStatisticsArea 6,678 km2 (2,578 sq mi)Population - Total - Catholics (as of 2012) 1,488,951 1,138,000 (76.4%)Parishes 94Churches 832InformationDenomination Roman Catholic Sui iuris
Sui iuris
church Latin
Latin
ChurchRite Roman RiteEstablished 499Cathedral Cathedral of Our Lady and St
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Campidoglio
Coordinates: 41°53′36″N 12°28′59″E / 41.89333°N 12.48306°E / 41.89333; 12.48306The Capitoline HillOne of the seven hills of Rome Latin
Latin
name Collis CapitolinusItalian name CampidoglioRione CampitelliBuildings Capitoline Museums
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Archbishop Of Malines
The Archdiocese
Archdiocese
of Mechelen- Brussels
Brussels
is an archdiocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Belgium. It is the Primatial See of Belgium
Belgium
and the centre of the Ecclesiastical Province governed by the Archbishop of Mechelen-Brussels, which covers the whole of Belgium. It was formed in 1559 and the bishop has a seat in two cathedrals, St. Rumbold's Cathedral in Mechelen
Mechelen
and the Cathedral of St. Michael and St. Gudula in Brussels
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Atlas (architecture)
In classical European architecture, an atlas (also known as an atlant, or atlante[1] or atlantid; plural atlantes)[2] is a support sculpted in the form of a man, which may take the place of a column, a pier or a pilaster. The Roman term for such a sculptural support is telamon (plural telamones or telamons).[2] The term atlantes is the Greek plural of the name Atlas—the Titan who was forced to hold the sky on his shoulders for eternity. The alternative term, telamones, also is derived from a later mythological hero, Telamon, one of the Argonauts, who was the father of Ajax. The caryatid is the female precursor of this architectural form in Greece, a woman standing in the place of each column or pillar. Caryatids are found at the treasuries at Delphi
Delphi
and the Erechtheion
Erechtheion
on the Acropolis at Athens for Athene
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Prado
The Prado Museum (Spanish: Museo del Prado; Spanish pronunciation: [muˈseo ðel ˈpɾaðo]) is the main Spanish national art museum, located in central Madrid. It is widely considered to have one of the world's finest collections of European art, dating from the 12th century to the early 20th century, based on the former Spanish Royal Collection, and the single best collection of Spanish art. Founded as a museum of paintings and sculpture in 1819, it also contains important collections of other types of works. El Prado is one of the most visited sites in the world, and it is considered one of the greatest art museums in the world
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Naples
Naples
Naples
(/ˈneɪpəlz/; Italian: Napoli [ˈnaːpoli] ( listen), Neapolitan: Napule [ˈnɑːpələ] or [ˈnɑːpulə]; Latin: Neapolis; Ancient Greek: Νεάπολις, meaning "new city") is the capital of the Italian region Campania
Campania
and the third-largest municipality in Italy
Italy
after Rome
Rome
and Milan. In 2017, around 967,069 people lived within the city's administrative limits. The Metropolitan City of Naples
Metropolitan City of Naples
had a population of 3,115,320
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Nocera Inferiore
Nocera Inferiore
Nocera Inferiore
is a city and comune in Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, at the foot of Monte Albino, 20 km east-south-east of Naples
Naples
by rail.Contents1 History 2 Main sights 3 Monuments3.1 Basilicas 3.2 Churches 3.3 Castle 3.4 Buildings 3.5 Museums4 Notable people 5 Transportation 6 Notes and references 7 See also 8 External linksHistory[edit] In the period before the Roman supremacy in southern Italy, Nuceria Alfaterna, situated between the current Nocera Inferiore
Nocera Inferiore
and Nocera Superiore, appears to have been the chief town in the valley of the river Sarnus, with Herculaneum, Pompeii, Stabiae
Stabiae
and Surrentum
Surrentum
all being dependent upon it
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Andrea Doria
Duchy of Urbino Papal States  Republic of Genoa  Kingdom of France Kingdom of SpainBattles/warsBattle of Pianosa, Siege of Marseille, Conquest of Tunis Battle of Preveza, Battle of Girolata, Siege of Algiers, Battle of Ponza Andrea Doria
Andrea Doria
(Italian: [andrˈea ˈdorj.a]; 30 November 1466 – 25 November 1560) was an Italian condottiero and admiral of the Republic of Genoa.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Wars between France and the Holy Roman Empire 3 Re-establishment of the Genoese Republic 4 As imperial admiral 5 Later years 6 Ships 7 Paintings and commemorations 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit]Natal home of Andrea Doria
Andrea Doria
in OnegliaDoria was born at Oneglia
Oneglia
from the ancient Genoese family, the Doria di Oneglia
Oneglia
branch of the old Doria, de Oria or de Auria family
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Galley
A galley is a type of ship that is propelled mainly by rowing. The galley is characterized by its long, slender hull, shallow draft and low freeboard (clearance between sea and railing). Virtually all types of galleys had sails that could be used in favorable winds, but human strength was always the primary method of propulsion. This allowed galleys to navigate independently of winds and currents. The galley originated among the seafaring civilizations around the Mediterranean Sea in the late second millennium BC and remained in use in various forms until the early 19th century in warfare, trade and piracy. Galleys were the warships used by the early Mediterranean naval powers, including the Greeks, Phoenicians
Phoenicians
and Romans. They remained the dominant types of vessels used for war and piracy in the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
until the last decades of the 16th century
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Pope Paul III
Pope
Pope
Paul III (Latin: Paulus III; 29 February 1468 – 10 November 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope
Pope
from 13 October 1534 to his death in 1549. He came to the papal throne in an era following the sack of Rome
Rome
in 1527 and rife with uncertainties in the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
following the Protestant Reformation. During his pontificate, and in the spirit of the Counter-Reformation, new Catholic religious orders and societies, such as the Jesuits, the Barnabites, and the Congregation of the Oratory, attracted a popular following. He convened the Council of Trent
Council of Trent
in 1545. He was a significant patron of the arts and employed nepotism to advance the power and fortunes of his family
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