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Leonard Levy
Leonard Williams Levy (April 9, 1923 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Canada
– August 24, 2006 in Ashland, Oregon) was an American historian, the Andrew W. Mellon All-Claremont Professor of Humanities and Chairman of the Graduate Faculty of History at Claremont Graduate School, California, who specialized in the history of basic American Constitutional freedoms. He was born in Toronto, Ontario, and educated at Columbia University, where his mentor for the Ph.D. degree was Henry Steele Commager. Levy's first book was a revision and expansion of his doctoral dissertation on Lemuel Shaw, chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. The Law of the Commonwealth and Chief Justice Shaw was first published by Harvard University Press in 1957, and has regularly been reprinted. Levy's most honored book was his 1968 study Origins of the Fifth Amendment, focusing on the history of the privilege against self-incrimination
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Zechariah Chafee
Zechariah Chafee, Jr. (December 7, 1885 – February 8, 1957), was an American professor of law, judicial philosopher and civil rights advocate. Defending freedom of speech, he was described by Senator Joseph McCarthy
Joseph McCarthy
as "dangerous" to America.[1] Legal scholar Richard Primus called Chafee “possibly the most important First Amendment scholar of the first half of the twentieth century.”[2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Civil liberties2 Family and personal life 3 Death 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Chafee was born in Providence, Rhode Island,[3] and graduated from Brown University, where he was a member of Alpha Delta Phi, in 1907. Later, he received a law degree from Harvard University, completing his LL.B. in 1913. He was influenced by the theories of sociological Jurisprudence
Jurisprudence
presented by Roscoe Pound
Roscoe Pound
and others at Harvard
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Toronto
Toronto
Toronto
(/təˈrɒntoʊ/ ( listen) tə-RON-toh, locally  [təˈɹɑnoʊ] (help·info)), officially the City of Toronto, is the capital of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is located within the Golden Horseshoe
Golden Horseshoe
in Southern Ontario
Ontario
on the northern shore of Lake Ontario. With 2,731,571 residents in 2016, it is the largest city in Canada
Canada
and fourth-largest city in North America by population
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Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
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Find A Grave
Find A Grave is a website that allows the public to search and add to an online database of cemetery records. It is owned by Ancestry.com. It receives and uploads digital photographs of headstones from burial sites, taken by unpaid volunteers at cemeteries
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The Oregon Encyclopedia
The Oregon
Oregon
Encyclopedia of History and Culture is a collaborative encyclopedia focused on the history and culture of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Oregon.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] The encyclopedia is a project of Portland State University's History Department, the Oregon
Oregon
Council of Teachers of English, and the Oregon Historical Society
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Southern Oregon State College
Southern Oregon University is a public liberal arts college located in Ashland, Oregon, United States. Founded in 1926, it was formerly known as Southern Oregon College and Southern Oregon State College. It offers programs in business, economics, criminology, natural sciences, including environmental science, Shakespearean studies and theatre arts programs. It is headquarters for Jefferson Public Radio and public access station Rogue Valley Television
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Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
(April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1801 to 1809. Previously, he was elected the second Vice President of the United States, serving under John Adams
John Adams
from 1797 to 1801. A proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights motivating American colonists to break from Great Britain and form a new nation, he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level. He was a land owner and farmer. Jefferson was primarily of English ancestry, born and educated in colonial Virginia. He graduated from the College of William & Mary and briefly practiced law, at times defending slaves seeking their freedom
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Harvard Law School
Harvard Law School
Harvard Law School
(also known as Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University
Harvard University
located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1817, it is the oldest continually-operating law school in the United States
United States
and is generally considered to be one of the most prestigious in the world.[2][3] The school is ranked third by the U.S. News & World and Report. Its acceptance rate was 15.4% in the 2013–14 admissions cycle, and its yield rate of 66.2% was the second-highest of any law school in the United States.[4][5] It is ranked first in the 2017 QS World University Rankings[6] and ninth in the 2018 Times Higher Education subject rankings.[7] The school has a considerably larger class size than most law schools – each class in the three-year J.D
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Origins Of The Fifth Amendment
Origins of the Fifth Amendment: The Right Against Self-Incrimination by American historian Leonard W. Levy (Oxford University Press, 1968)[2] won the 1969 Pulitzer Prize for History. It followed in the wake of the 1966 United States Supreme Court Opinion Miranda v. Arizona. The book was reissued in 1986 and 1999. References[edit]^ Lithwick, Dahlia (February 12, 2002). "Where Did the Fifth Amendment Come From?". Slate.  ^ books.google.comv t ePulitzer Prize for History1917–19191917: With Americans of Past and Present Days by Jean Jules Jusserand 1918: A History of the Civil War, 1861–1865 by James Ford Rhodes 1919: no award given1920–19291920: The War with Mexico by Justin H. Smith 1921: The Victory at Sea by William Sowden Sims and Burton J
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Lemuel Shaw
Lemuel Shaw
Lemuel Shaw
(January 9, 1781 – March 30, 1861) was an American jurist who served as Chief Justice of the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Supreme Judicial Court (1830–1860). Prior to his appointment he also served for several years in the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
House of Representatives and as a state senator. In 1847 Shaw became the father-in-law of author Herman Melville.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Early life and education 1.2 Career 1.3 Legacy2 Parkman-Webster murder case 3 Marriage and family 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife and career[edit] Early life and education[edit] Shaw was born in West Barnstable, Massachusetts, the second son of Oakes Shaw and his second wife Susanna, who was a daughter of John H. Hayward of Braintree. The Shaws were descendants of Abraham Shaw, who left Halifax, England
England
in 1636 and settled in Dedham
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