HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Leo Marks
Leopold Samuel "Leo" Marks, MBE
MBE
(24 September 1920 – 15 January 2001) was an English writer, screenwriter, and cryptographer. During the Second World War
Second World War
he headed the codes office supporting resistance agents in occupied Europe for the secret Special
Special
Operations Executive organisation. After the war, Marks became a playwright and screenwriter, writing scripts that frequently utilised his war-time cryptographic experiences. He wrote the script for Peeping Tom, the controversial film directed by Michael Powell
Michael Powell
which had a disastrous effect on Powell's career, but later described by Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
as a masterpiece
[...More...]

"Leo Marks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

German-occupied Europe
German-occupied Europe
Europe
refers to the sovereign countries of Europe which were occupied by the military forces of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
at various times between 1939 and 1945 and administered by the Nazi regimes.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Occupied countries2.1 Governments in exile2.1.1 Allied governments in exile 2.1.2 Axis governments in exile 2.1.3 Neutral governments in exile3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksBackground[edit] Several German occupied countries entered World War II
World War II
as Allies of the United Kingdom[2] or the Soviet Union.[3] Some were forced to surrender before outbreak of the war such as Czechoslovakia;[4] others like Poland
Poland
(invaded on 1 September 1939)[1] were conquered in battle and then occupied
[...More...]

"German-occupied Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

BBC Radio
BBC
BBC
Radio is an operational business division[1] and service of the British Broadcasting Corporation
British Broadcasting Corporation
(which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
since 1927). The service provides national radio stations covering the majority of musical genres, as well as local radio stations covering local news, affairs and interests. It also oversees online audio content.[2] Of the national radio stations, BBC
BBC
Radio 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Live are all available through analogue radio (5 Live on AM only) as well as on DAB Digital Radio and internet services through RealMedia, WMA and BBC iPlayer
[...More...]

"BBC Radio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Frank Doel
Frank Percy Doel (14 July 1908 – 22 December 1968) was a British antiquarian bookseller for Marks & Co in London who achieved posthumous fame as the recipient of a series of humorous letters from American author Helene Hanff, to which he scrupulously and, at first, very formally replied
[...More...]

"Frank Doel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bletchley Park
Bletchley
Bletchley
Park was the central site for British (and subsequently, Allied) codebreakers during World War II. It housed the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), which regularly penetrated the secret communications of the Axis Powers – most importantly the German Enigma and Lorenz ciphers
[...More...]

"Bletchley Park" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baker Street
Baker Street
Baker Street
is a street in the Marylebone
Marylebone
district of the City of Westminster
Westminster
in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid out the street in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street
221B Baker Street
address on the north of the street. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Contents1 Location 2 History2.1 19th century 2.2 20th century3 Buildings 4 Transport 5 In popular culture 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 ReferencesLocation[edit] Baker Street
Baker Street
is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there
[...More...]

"Baker Street" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wormelow Tump
Wormelow Tump
Wormelow Tump
is a village in Herefordshire, England, 11 km (6.8 mi) south of Hereford
Hereford
and 15 km (9.3 mi) northwest of Ross-on-Wye. The tump itself was a mound which local tradition holds was the burial place of King Arthur's son Amr.[1] The tump was flattened to widen the road in 1896.[2] Wormelow gave its name to a hundred. The Domesday Book
Domesday Book
mentions the custom that all citizens of Herefordshire
Herefordshire
who owned a horse were required to attend the meeting of all the hundreds, which took place every three years at Wormelow Tump.[2] The village is the site of the Violette Szabo
Violette Szabo
GC Museum, commemorating the life of World War II
World War II
secret agent Violette Szabo
[...More...]

"Wormelow Tump" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Resistance During World War II
Resistance movements during World War II
World War II
occurred in every occupied country by a variety of means, ranging from non-cooperation, disinformation and propaganda, to hiding crashed pilots and even to outright warfare and the recapturing of towns
[...More...]

"Resistance During World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dwight D. Eisenhower
World War II Supreme Allied Commander in EuropeD-Day Operation OverlordSurrender of Germany VE-DayCrusade in EuropePresident of the United StatesPresidencyFirst TermDraft movement1952 CampaignElection1st InaugurationKorean War Atoms for PeaceCold WarNew Look Domino theoryInterstate Highway SystemSecond Term1956 campaignElection2nd InaugurationEisenhower Doctrine Sputnik
Sputnik
crisis Missile gapNDEA NASA DARPACivil Rights Act of 1957 Little Rock NineU-2 incident Farewell AddressPost-PresidencyLegacy Presidential library and museum Tributes and memorialsv t eDwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (/ˈaɪzənhaʊ.ər/ EYE-zən-how-ər; October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American army general and statesman who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961
[...More...]

"Dwight D. Eisenhower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anton Lesser
Anton Lesser
Anton Lesser
(born 14 February 1952) is an English actor
[...More...]

"Anton Lesser" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

David Jason
Sir
Sir
David John White, OBE (born 2 February 1940), known professionally by his stage name David Jason, is an English actor and comedian. He portrayed Derek "Del Boy" Trotter in the BBC comedy series Only Fools and Horses, and Detective Inspector Jack Frost
Jack Frost
in the ITV crime drama A Touch of Frost. Other high-profile television roles were as Granville in the sitcom Open All Hours, and Pop Larkin in the comedy drama The Darling Buds of May as well as the voices of Mr. Toad in The Wind in the Willows, Danger Mouse, and Count Duckula. His last original appearance as Del Boy was in 2014, while Jason retired his role as Frost in 2010. In September 2006 Jason topped the poll to find TV's 50 Greatest Stars, as part of ITV's 50th anniversary celebrations.[2] He was knighted in 2005 for services to drama
[...More...]

"David Jason" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

84, Charing Cross Road
84, Charing Cross Road is a 1970 book by Helene Hanff, later made into a stage play, television play, and film, about the twenty-year correspondence between the author and Frank Doel, chief buyer of Marks & Co antiquarian booksellers, located at the eponymous address in London, England. Contents1 Background 2 The shop's site today 3 Bibliography 4 Adaptations 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Hanff was in search of obscure classics and British literature titles that she had been unable to find in New York City when she noticed an ad in the Saturday Review of Literature. She first contacted the shop in 1949 and it fell to Doel to fulfil her requests. In time, a long-distance friendship developed between the two and between Hanff and other staff members, as well, with an exchange of Christmas packages, birthday gifts and food parcels to help with the post-World War II food shortages in Britain
[...More...]

"84, Charing Cross Road" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stephanie Cole
Patricia Stephanie Cole, OBE (born 5 October 1941)[1] is an English stage, television, radio and film actress, known for high-profile television roles in shows such as Tenko (1981–85), Open All Hours (1982–85), A Bit of a Do (1989), Waiting for God (1990–94), Keeping Mum (1997–98), Doc Martin
Doc Martin
(2004–09), Still Open All Hours (2013–present) Man Down (2014-present) and as Sylvia Goodwin
Sylvia Goodwin
in ITV soap opera Coronation Street
Coronation Street
(2011–13). She won Best TV Actress at the 1992 British Comedy Awards
British Comedy Awards
for her role in Waiting For God and won Best Comedy Performance at the 2012 British Soap Awards for her role in Coronation Street
[...More...]

"Stephanie Cole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vera Atkins
Vera May Atkins, CBE
CBE
(16 June 1908 – 24 June 2000) was a British intelligence officer who worked in the French Section of the Special Operations Executive (SOE) from 1941 to 1945 during the Second World War.Contents1 Early life 2 Special Operations Executive
Special Operations Executive
(SOE) 3 Controversy 4 The search for F Section's missing agents 5 After the Second World War 6 Honours and decorations 7 Death 8 In popular culture 9 References 10 BibliographyEarly life[edit] Atkins was born Vera Maria Rosenberg in Galați, Romania, to Max Rosenberg (d. 1932), a German-Jewish father, and his British-Jewish wife, Zeffro Hilda, known as Hilda, (d
[...More...]

"Vera Atkins" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Transposition Cipher
In cryptography, a transposition cipher is a method of encryption by which the positions held by units of plaintext (which are commonly characters or groups of characters) are shifted according to a regular system, so that the ciphertext constitutes a permutation of the plaintext. That is, the order of the units is changed (the plaintext is reordered). Mathematically a bijective function is used on the characters' positions to encrypt and an inverse function to decrypt. Following are some implementations.Contents1 Rail Fence cipher 2 Route cipher 3 Columnar transposition 4 Double transposition 5 Myszkowski transposition 6 Disrupted transposition 7 Grilles 8 Scytale 9 Detection and cryptanalysis 10 Combinations 11 Fractionation 12 See also 13 Notes 14 ReferencesRail Fence cipher[edit] The Rail Fence cipher is a form of transposition cipher that gets its name from the way in which it is encoded
[...More...]

"Transposition Cipher" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Key (cryptography)
In cryptography, a key is a piece of information (a parameter) that determines the functional output of a cryptographic algorithm. For encryption algorithms, a key specifies the transformation of plaintext into ciphertext, and vice versa for decryption algorithms. Keys also specify transformations in other cryptographic algorithms, such as digital signature schemes and message authentication codes.Contents1 Need for secrecy 2 Key scope 3 Ownership and revocation 4 Key sizes 5 Key choice 6 Key vs password 7 See also 8 ReferencesNeed for secrecy[edit] In designing security systems, it is wise to assume that the details of the cryptographic algorithm are already available to the attacker. This is known as Kerckhoffs' principle — "only secrecy of the key provides security", or, reformulated as Shannon's maxim, "the enemy knows the system"
[...More...]

"Key (cryptography)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.