HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Lemuriformes
Lemuroidea Lorisoidea[a] (See text) Lemuriformes
Lemuriformes
is an infraorder of primate that falls under the suborder Strepsirrhini. It includes the lemurs of Madagascar, as well as the galagos and lorisids of Africa and Asia, although a popular alternative taxonomy places the lorisoids in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes.[a] Lemuriform primates are characterized by a toothcomb, a specialized set of teeth in the front, lower part of the mouth mostly used for combing fur during grooming.[4]Contents1 Evolutionary history 2 Taxonomic classification 3 Notes 4 References4.1 Literature citedEvolutionary history[edit] See also: Evolutionary history of lemurs Lemuriform origins are unclear and debated
[...More...]

"Lemuriformes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paleocene
The Paleocene
Paleocene
( /ˈpæliəˌsiːn, ˈpæ-, -lioʊ-/[2]) or Palaeocene, the "old recent", is a geologic epoch that lasted from about 66 to 56 million years ago. It is the first epoch of the Paleogene Period in the modern Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. As with many geologic periods, the strata that define the epoch's beginning and end are well identified, but the exact ages remain uncertain. The Paleocene
Paleocene
Epoch is bracketed by two major events in Earth's history. It started with the mass extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous, known as the Cretaceous– Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary. This was a time marked by the demise of non-avian dinosaurs, giant marine reptiles and much other fauna and flora. The die-off of the dinosaurs left unfilled ecological niches worldwide
[...More...]

"Paleocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uganda
Coordinates: 1°N 32°E / 1°N 32°E / 1; 32 Republic
Republic
of Uganda[1] Jamhuri ya Uganda  (Swahili)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "For God and My Country" "kwa mungu na nchi yangu"Anthem: "Oh Uganda, Land of Beauty"Location of  Uganda  (dark green) – in Africa  (light blue & dark grey) – in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city KampalaOfficial languages English Swahili[2]
[...More...]

"Uganda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Treeshrew
The treeshrews (or tree shrews or banxrings[2]) are small Euarchontoglire mammals native to the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. They make up the families Tupaiidae, the treeshrews, and Ptilocercidae, the pen-tailed treeshrew, and the entire order Scandentia. The 20 species are placed in five genera. Treeshrews have a higher brain to body mass ratio than any other mammal, including humans,[3] but high ratios are not uncommon for animals weighing less than a kilogram. Though called 'treeshrews', and despite having previously been classified in Insectivora, they are not true shrews, and not all species live in trees
[...More...]

"Treeshrew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Colugo
Colugos (/kəˈluːɡoʊz/[2][3]) are arboreal gliding mammals found in Southeast Asia. Just two extant species[1] make up the entire family Cynocephalidae
Cynocephalidae
(/ˌsaɪnoʊˌsɛfəˈlaɪdiː, -ˌkɛ-/[4]) and order Dermoptera. They are the most capable gliders of all gliding mammals, using flaps of extra skin between their legs to glide from higher to lower locations. They are also known as cobegos or flying lemurs, although they are not true lemurs but are named due to their resemblance.Contents1 Characteristics 2 Status 3 Classification and evolution3.1 Synonyms4 References 5 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Colugos are tree-dwelling mammals. They reach lengths of 35 to 40 cm (14 to 16 in) and weigh 1 to 2 kg (2.2 to 4.4 lb).[5] They have long, slender front and rear limbs, a medium-length tail, and a relatively light build
[...More...]

"Colugo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plesiadapiformes
Plesiadapiformes
Plesiadapiformes
("Adapid-like" or "near Adapiformes") is an extinct (and possibly paraphyletic or polyphyletic[1][2][3]) order of mammals. The group is either closely related to the primates or a precursor to them. Many are too derived to be ancestral to primates, but the earliest Plesiadapiformes
Plesiadapiformes
had teeth that are strongly indicative of a common ancestor. Purgatorius
Purgatorius
is believed to be close to the last common ancestor of primates and Plesiadapiformes. Plesiadapiformes
Plesiadapiformes
first appear in the fossil record between 65 and 55 million years ago,[4] although many were extinct by the beginning of the Eocene
[...More...]

"Plesiadapiformes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Haplorhini
Haplorhini
Haplorhini
(the haplorhines or the "dry-nosed" primates, the Greek name means "simple-nosed") is a suborder of primates containing the tarsiers and the simians ( Simiiformes
Simiiformes
or anthropoids), as sister of the Strepsirrhini. The name is sometimes spelled Haplorrhini.[2] The simians include catarrhines (Old World monkeys and apes including humans), and the platyrrhines (New World monkeys). The extinct omomyids, which are considered to be the most basal haplorhines, are believed to be more closely related to the tarsiers than to other haplorhines. The exact relationship is not yet fully established – Williams, Kay and Kirk (2010) prefer the view that tarsiers and simians share a common ancestor, and that common ancestor shares a common ancestor with the omomyids, citing evidence from analysis by Bajpal et al
[...More...]

"Haplorhini" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Adapiformes
Adapiformes
Adapiformes
is an extinct group of early primates. Adapiforms radiated throughout much of the northern continental mass (now Europe, Asia
Asia
and North America), reaching as far south as northern Africa
Africa
and tropical Asia. They existed from the Eocene
Eocene
to the Miocene
Miocene
epoch. Some adapiforms looked similar to living lemurs. Adapiforms are known from the fossil record only, and it is unclear whether they form a monophyletic or paraphyletic group
[...More...]

"Adapiformes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Karanisia
†K. arenula †K. clarkiKaranisia is an extinct genus of strepsirrhine primate and is represented by two species, K. clarki[1][2] and K. arenula.[3] Originally considered a crown lorisid, more comprehensive phylogenetic analyses suggest it is a more basal to living strepsirrhines, either as a stem lorisid or stem lemuroid.[4] K. clarki was described in 2003 from isolated teeth and jaw fragments found in Late Middle Eocene (c. 40 million years ago) sediments of the Birket Qarun Formation in the Egyptian Faiyum.[5][6] The specimens indicate the presence of a toothcomb, making it the earliest fossil primate to indisputably bear this trait, which is unique to all living strepsirrhines (lemurs, lorises, and galagos).[6] In 2010 a second species, K. arenula, was described in the journal Nature from Late Middle Eocene rocks in Libya.[3] References[edit]^ "Karanisia". The Paleobiology Database. Retrieved 2009-07-08.  ^ "Karanisia clarki". ZipCodeZoo.com
[...More...]

"Karanisia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Faiyum Oasis
The Faiyum
Faiyum
Oasis (Arabic: واحة الفيوم‎ Waḥet El Fayyum) is a depression or basin in the desert immediately to the west of the Nile
Nile
south of Cairo. The extent of the basin area is estimated at between 1,270 km² (490 mi²) and 1700 km² (656 mi²). The basin floor comprises fields watered by a channel of the Nile, the Bahr Yussef, as it drains into a desert depression to the west of the Nile
Nile
Valley. The Bahr Yussef veers west through a narrow neck of land north of Ihnasya, between the archaeological sites of El Lahun
El Lahun
and Gurob near Hawara; it then branches out, providing rich agricultural land in the Faiyum
Faiyum
basin, draining into the large saltwater Lake Moeris
Lake Moeris
(Birket Qarun). The lake was freshwater in prehistory but is today a saltwater lake
[...More...]

"Faiyum Oasis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kenya
Coordinates: 1°N 38°E / 1°N 38°E / 1; 38 Republic
Republic
of Kenya Jamhuri ya Kenya
Kenya
(Kiswahili)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Harambee" (Kiswahili) "Let us all pull together"Anthem: Ee Mungu Nguvu Yetu O God of all creationLocation
[...More...]

"Kenya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eocene
The Eocene
Eocene
( /ˈiːəˌsiːn, ˈiːoʊ-/[2][3]) Epoch, lasting from 56 to 33.9 million years ago, is a major division of the geologic timescale and the second epoch of the Paleogene Period in the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. The Eocene
Eocene
spans the time from the end of the Paleocene Epoch to the beginning of the Oligocene
Oligocene
Epoch. The start of the Eocene is marked by a brief period in which the concentration of the carbon isotope 13C in the atmosphere was exceptionally low in comparison with the more common isotope 12C. The end is set at a major extinction event called the Grande Coupure (the "Great Break" in continuity) or the Eocene– Oligocene
Oligocene
extinction event, which may be related to the impact of one or more large bolides in Siberia and in what is now Chesapeake Bay
[...More...]

"Eocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paleontology
Paleontology
Paleontology
or palaeontology (/ˌpeɪliɒnˈtɒlədʒi, ˌpæli-, -ən-/) is the scientific study of life that existed prior to, and sometimes including, the start of the Holocene
Holocene
Epoch (roughly 11,700 years before present). It includes the study of fossils to determine organisms' evolution and interactions with each other and their environments (their paleoecology). Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as the 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier's work on comparative anatomy, and developed rapidly in the 19th century. The term itself originates from Greek παλαιός, palaios, "old, ancient", ὄν, on (gen
[...More...]

"Paleontology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tunisia
Islam
Islam
(state religion; 99.1% Sunni[9] others (1%; including Christian, Jewish, Shia, Bahá'í)[9]Demonym TunisianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic[12][13]• PresidentBeji Caid Essebsi• Head of GovernmentYoussef ChahedLegislature Assembly of the Representatives of the PeopleFormation•  Husainid Dynasty
[...More...]

"Tunisia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Azibiidae
Azibiidae is an extinct family of fossil primate from the late early or early middle Eocene from the Glib Zegdou Formation in the Gour Lazib area of Algeria. They are thought to be related to the living toothcombed primates, the lemurs and lorisoids (known as strepsirrhines), although paleoanthropologists such as Marc Godinot have argued that they may be early simians (monkeys and apes). It includes the genera Azibius and Algeripithecus, the latter of which was originally considered the oldest known simian, not a strepsirrhine. Originally described as a type of plesiadapiform (an extinct group of arboreal mammals considered to be a sister group to the primate clade), its fragmentary remains have been interpreted as a hyopsodontid (a type of extinct condylarth), an adapid (an extinct type of adapiform primate from Europe), and a macroscelidid (elephant shrews)
[...More...]

"Azibiidae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Algeria
Coordinates: 28°N 2°E / 28°N 2°E / 28; 2People's Democratic Republic of Algeria الجمهورية الجزائرية الديمقراطية الشعبية (Arabic) ⵟⴰⴳⴷⵓⴷⴰ ⵜⴰⵎⴻⴳⴷⴰⵢⵜ ⵜⴰⵖⴻⵔⴼⴰⵏⵜ ⵜⴰⵣⵣⴰⵢⵔⵉⵜ (Berber) République Algérienne Démocratique et Populaire (French)FlagEmblemMotto: بالشّعب وللشّعب By the people and for the people[1][2]Anthem: Kassaman (English: "We Pledge")Location of  Algeria  (dark green)Capital and largest city Algiers 36°42′N 3°13′E / 36.700°N 3.217°E / 36.700; 3.217Official languagesArabic[3] Berber[4]Other languagesFrench (business and education)[5] Darja
[...More...]

"Algeria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.