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Legambiente
Legambiente is an Italian environmentalist association with roots in the anti-nuclear movement that developed in Italy and throughout the Western world in the second half of the '70s. Founded in 1980 as part of the ARCI, it later became and a stand-alone organisation. Originally known as Lega per l'ambiente (League for the Environment), it changed name during the IV National Congress held in Parma in 1992. [1] The mission of the association is to make the environmental culture the centre of a new kind of development and diffused well-being. Important values for the association are the improvement of environmental quality, the fight against all forms of pollution, a wise use of natural resources, the construction of a more balanced relationship between human beings and the nature
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Anti-nuclear Movement
The anti-nuclear movement is a social movement that opposes various nuclear technologies. Some direct action groups, environmental movements, and professional organisations have identified themselves with the movement at the local, national, or international level.[2][3] Major anti-nuclear groups include Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, and the Nuclear Information and Resource Service. The initial objective of the movement was nuclear disarmament, though since the late 1960s opposition has included the use of nuclear power. Many anti-nuclear groups oppose both nuclear power and nuclear weapons
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Illegal Building
Illegal construction or building is construction work (or the result of such) without a valid construction permit. Besides the potential technical hazards on uncontrolled construction sites and in finished buildings, illegal building activity can be a major environmental violation when the works encroach upon preserve areas like nature reserves. Likewise, illegal building can have serious political implications when it is practiced as landgrabbing or for illegal settling in foreign territories (see e.g. International law and Israeli settlements). Illegal building can be the consequence of a combination of urbanization, overpopulation, homelessness and poverty in which case expanding slums, Shanty towns or similar will result. On the other hand, illegal building activity may be due to profitable speculation with and exploitation of valuable real property
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Illegal Dumping
Illegal dumping,[1][2] also called fly dumping or fly tipping,[3] is the dumping of waste illegally instead of using an authorised method such as kerbside collection or using an authorised rubbish dump. It is the illegal deposit of any waste onto land, including waste dumped or tipped on a site with no licence to accept waste.[4][5]Contents1 Terminology 2 United Kingdom 3 Open dumping 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTerminology[edit] Illegal dumping
Illegal dumping
is typically distinguished from littering by the type and amount of material and/or the manner in which it is discarded
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Renewable Energy
Renewable energy
Renewable energy
is energy that is collected from renewable resources, which are naturally replenished on a human timescale, such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves, and geothermal heat.[2] Renewable energy often provides energy in four important areas: electricity generation, air and water heating/cooling, transportation, and rural (off-grid) energy services.[3] Based on REN21's 2016 report, renewables contributed 19.2% to humans' global energy consumption and 23.7% to their generation of electricity in 2014 and 2015, respectively. This energy consumption is divided as 8.9% coming from traditional biomass, 4.2% as heat energy (modern biomass, geothermal and solar heat), 3.9% hydro electricity and 2.2% is electricity from wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass
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Circular Economy
There are various definitions of a circular economy: An idea for a truly sustainable future that works without waste, in symbiosis with our environment and resources. A future where every product is designed for multiple cycles of use, and different material or manufacturing cycles are carefully aligned, so that the output of one process always feeds the input of another
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Protected Area
Protected areas or conservation areas are locations which receive protection because of their recognized natural, ecological or cultural values. There are several kinds of protected areas, which vary by level of protection depending on the enabling laws of each country or the regulations of the international organizations involved. The term "protected area" also includes Marine Protected Areas, the boundaries of which will include some area of ocean, and Transboundary Protected Areas that overlap multiple countries which remove the borders inside the area for conservation and economic purposes
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Seveso
Seveso
Seveso
(in Lombard dialect: Séves) is a town and comune in the Province of Monza
Monza
and Brianza, in the Region of Lombardy. The economy of the town has traditionally been based on the furniture industry. Its name comes from the river of the same name which crosses the comune in a north-south direction. Seveso
Seveso
received the honorary title of city with a presidential decree on 18 June 2003.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 External linksGeography[edit] The town is situated 21 kilometres (13 mi) to the north of Milan in the Brianza lowlands. The territory of the commume is highly urbanised, with the majority of inhabitants living in the town. Seveso
Seveso
lies on the national trunk road Statale dei Giovi, which connects Milan
Milan
to Como
Como
and on the Milan-Meda motorway
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Partito Comunista Italiano
Communist Party of ItalyAfter Second World WarItalian Communist Party International Communist Party Proletarian Unity Party Proletarian Democracy Movement of Unitarian Communists Movement for the Left Internationalist Communist Party (Battaglia Comunista)Current communist partiesCommunist Refoundation Party Party of Italian Communists The Other Europe Workers Communist Party Communist Party Italian Marxist–Leninist Party International Bureau for the Revolutionary PartyLeadersAchille Occhetto Alessandro Natta Amadeo Bordiga Antonio Gramsci Enrico Berlinguer Fausto Bertinotti Giorgio Napolitano Giovanni Scuderi Luigi Longo Marco Ferrando Nichi Vendola Nicola Bombacci Nilde Iotti Oliviero Diliberto Onorato Damen Palmiro Togliatti Paolo Ferrero Ruggero GriecoCommunist organizationsCGIL Popular Democratic Front
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Alexander Langer
Alexander Langer
Alexander Langer
(22 February 1946 – 3 July 1995) was an Italian journalist, peace activist, politician, translator, and teacher.Contents1 Biography 2 Alexander Langer
Alexander Langer
Award 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born on 22 February 1946 in Sterzing, South Tyrol, a province of Italy inhabited by a German-speaking population, he became involved early on in local political issues, which at the time centered on the interethnic relations in the region, which after two world wars and decades of tensions and terrorism were very tense. In the early 1970s he was active in Lotta Continua, a left-wing political organization in Italy. Later, he joined the Green Party of South Tyrol, and became a member of the regional council for Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol in 1978. Ever resistant to imposed ethnic boundaries, he refused twice to declare his ethnic group during the 1981 and 1991 census in Bolzano
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Particulates
Atmospheric aerosol particles, also known as atmospheric particulate matter, particulate matter (PM), particulates, or suspended particulate matter (SPM) are microscopic solid or liquid matter suspended in Earth's atmosphere. The term aerosol commonly refers to the particulate/air mixture, as opposed to the particulate matter alone.[3] Sources of particulate matter can be natural or anthropogenic
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Nuclear Power Debate
The nuclear power debate is a long-running controversy[2][3][4][5][6][7][8] about the risks and benefits of using nuclear reactors to generate electricity for civilian purposes. The debate about nuclear power peaked during the 1970s and 1980s, as more and more reactors were built and came online, and "reached an intensity unprecedented in the history of technology controversies" in some countries.[9][10] Thereafter, the nuclear industry created jobs, focused on safety and public concerns mostly waned. In the last decade, however, with growing public awareness about climate change and the critical role that carbon dioxide and methane emissions plays in causing the heating of the earth's atmosphere, there's been a resurgence in the intensity nuclear power debate once again
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Nuclear Power In Italy
Nuclear power
Nuclear power
in Italy
Italy
is a controversial topic. Italy
Italy
started to produce nuclear energy in the early 1960s, but all plants were closed by 1990 following the Italian nuclear power referendum. An attempt to change the decision was made in 2008 by the government (see also nuclear power debate), which called the nuclear power phase-out a "terrible mistake, the cost of which totalled over €50 billion".[1] Minister of Economic Development Claudio Scajola proposed to build as many as 10 new reactors, with the goal of increasing the nuclear share of Italy's electricity supply to about 25% by 2030.[2] However, following the 2011 Japanese nuclear accidents, the Italian government put a one-year moratorium on plans to revive nuclear power.[3] On 11—12 June 2011, Italian voters passed a referendum to cancel plans for new reactors
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Federazione Dei Verdi
The Federation of the Greens (Italian: Federazione dei Verdi, or just Verdi) is a green political party in Italy. The party's leader/s is/are variably known as "president/s" or "spokesperson/s". Currently, Giobbe Covatta serves as the party's spokesperson, more recently cited as "testimonial". Additionally, Angelo Bonelli, Fiorella Zabatta and Gianluca Carrabs serve as coordinators for "national politics", while Luana Zanella oversees "foreign policy".Contents1 History1.1 Background and foundation 1.2 Centre-left coalitions 1.3 Shift to the far left 1.4 Out of Parliament 1.5 New coalitions 1.6 Return to the centre-left2 Popular support 3 Election results3.1 Italian Parliament 3.2 European Parliament 3.3 Regional Councils4 Leadership 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Background and foundation[edit] The Green Lists (GL), led by Gianni Mattioli and Alexander Langer, made their debut at the 1987 general election and obtained 2.6% of the vote
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Italian Referendums, 1987
Five nationwide popular referendums were held in Italy on 8 November 1987, with three questions about nuclear energy after the Chernobyl disaster, and two questions about justice. Voting day had been postponed of six months, according to the Italian Constitution, because of the snap election of spring. Turnout was quite high, with a 65% of the electors participating to the referendum
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