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Left-libertarianism
Left-libertarianism
Left-libertarianism
(or left-wing libertarianism)[1] names several related, but distinct approaches to political and social theory which stress both individual freedom and social equality. In its classical usage, left-libertarianism is a synonym for anti-authoritarian varieties of left-wing politics, e.g
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Restorative Justice
Restorative justice
Restorative justice
is an approach to justice that personalizes the crime by having the victims and the offenders mediate a restitution agreement to the satisfaction of each, as well as involving the community. This contrasts to other approaches such as retribution, deterrence, rehabilitation, or incapacitation. Victims take an active role in the process
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Dispute Resolution Organization
Stefan Basil Molyneux (/stəˈfæn ˈmɒlɪnjuː/; born September 24, 1966) is a Canadian podcaster and YouTuber. Molyneux, a self-published author, usually speaks on topics including anarcho-capitalism, politics, relationships, race and intelligence, multiculturalism, libertarianism, anti-feminism,[2] and familial relationships
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Limited Government
In political philosophy, limited government is where governmental power is restricted by law, usually in a written constitution. It is a key concept in the history of liberalism. The Magna Carta
Magna Carta
and the United States Constitution
Constitution
represent important milestones in the limiting of governmental power
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Marriage Privatization
Marriage
Marriage
privatization is the concept that the state should have no authority to define the terms of personal relationships such as marriage. Proponents of marriage privatization, including certain minarchists, anarchists, libertarians, and opponents of government interventionism, claim that such relationships are best defined by private individuals and not the state. Arguments for the privatization of marriage have been offered by a number of scholars and writers. Proponents of marriage privatization often argue that privatizing marriage is a solution to the social controversy over same-sex marriage
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Illegalism
Illegalism
Illegalism
is an anarchist philosophy that developed primarily in France, Italy, Belgium
Belgium
and
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Natural And Legal Rights
Natural and legal rights
Natural and legal rights
are two types of rights. Natural rights are those that are not dependent on the laws or customs of any particular culture or government, and so are universal and inalienable (they cannot be repealed or restrained by human laws). Legal rights are those bestowed onto a person by a given legal system (they can be modified, repealed, and restrained by human laws). The concept of natural law is related to the concept of natural rights. Natural law
Natural law
first appeared in ancient Greek philosophy,[1] and was referred to by Roman philosopher
Roman philosopher
Cicero. It was subsequently alluded to in the Bible,[2] and then developed in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
by Catholic philosophers such as Albert the Great
Albert the Great
and his pupil Thomas Aquinas
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Gift Economy
A gift economy, gift culture, or gift exchange is a mode of exchange where valuables are not traded or sold, but rather given without an explicit agreement for immediate or future rewards.[1] This contrasts with a barter economy or a market economy, where goods and services are primarily exchanged for value received. Social norms and custom govern gift exchange. Gifts are not given in an explicit exchange of goods or services for money or some other commodity.[2] The nature of gift economies forms the subject of a foundational debate in anthropology. Anthropological research into gift economies began with Bronisław Malinowski's description of the Kula ring[3] in the Trobriand Islands
Trobriand Islands
during World War I.[4] The Kula trade appeared to be gift-like since Trobrianders would travel great distances over dangerous seas to give what were considered valuable objects without any guarantee of a return
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Age Of Enlightenment
The Enlightenment
The Enlightenment
(also known as the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
or the Age of Reason;[1] in French: le Siècle des Lumières, lit. '"the Century of Lights"'; and in German: Aufklärung, "Enlightenment")[2] was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century, "The Century of Philosophy".[3] The Enlightenment
The Enlightenment
included a range of ideas centered on reason as the primary source of authority and legitimacy and came to advance ideals like liberty, progress, tolerance, fraternity, constitutional government and separation of church and state.[4][5] In France, the central doctrines of the Enlightenment philosophers were individual liberty and religious tolerance, in opposition to an absolute monarchy and the fixed dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church
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Free Will
Free will
Free will
is the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded.[1][2] Free will
Free will
is closely linked to the concepts of responsibility, praise, guilt, sin, and other judgements which apply only to actions that are freely chosen. It is also connected with the concepts of advice, persuasion, deliberation, and prohibition. Traditionally, only actions that are freely willed are seen as deserving credit or blame. There are numerous different concerns about threats to the possibility of free will, varying by how exactly it is conceived, which is a matter of some debate. Some conceive free will to be the capacity to make choices in which the outcome has not been determined by past events. Determinism suggests that only one course of events is possible, which is inconsistent with the existence of free will thus conceived
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Free Migration
Free migration or open immigration is the position that people should be able to migrate to whatever country they choose.Contents1 Argument for free migration1.1 Human rights
Human rights
perspective2 Arguments against free migration 3 Free migration of war/political refugees 4 Areas with free internal migration 5 Areas with free external migration 6 Spiritual perspectives on migration 7 Law and Ethics 8 Economic Considerations 9 Discrimination 10 See also 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksArgument for free migration[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Non-politics
Apoliticism is apathy or antipathy towards all political affiliations.[1] Being apolitical can also refer to situations in which people take an unbiased position in regard to political matters.[2] The Collins Dictionary defines apolitical as "politically neutral; without political attitudes, content, or bias".[3]Contents1 See also 2 Footnotes 3 References 4 External linksSee also[edit]Abstention Anti-democracy Dealignment Disenchantment Independent (voter) Moderate Nonpartisan Non-voting Political alienation Political apathy Protest vote Rejectionism Religious rejection of politics Voter apathyFootnotes[edit]^ P.51, Rabin & Bowman ^ "Iraq war inquiry: Sir John Chilcot vows to 'get to the heart' of decision to go to war". The Daily Telegraph. 24 Nov 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2012. "My colleagues and I come to this task with open minds. We are apolitical and independent of any political party. We want to examine the evidence
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Expropriative Anarchism
Expropriative anarchism
Expropriative anarchism
(Spanish: anarquismo expropiador) is the name given to a practice carried out by certain anarchist affinity groups in Argentina
Argentina
and Spain
Spain
which involved theft, robbery, scams and counterfeiting currency.[1][2][3] The robberies done were called "expropriations on the bourgeoisie". It had its major peak between 1920 and 1935 and some of its most famous practitioners were Buenaventura Durruti, Francisco Ascaso, Severino Di Giovanni, Miguel Arcángel Roscigna, and Lucio Urtubia
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Laissez-faire
Laissez-faire (/ˌlɛseɪˈfɛər/; French: [lɛsefɛʁ] ( listen); from French: laissez faire, lit. 'let do') is an economic system in which transactions between private parties are free from government intervention such as regulation, privileges, tariffs and subsidies. The phrase laissez-faire is part of a larger French phrase and basically translates to "let (it/them) do", but in this context usually means to "let go".[1]Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Fundamentals 3 History of laissez-faire debate3.1 Europe 3.2 United States4 Raw capitalism 5 Critiques 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further readingEtymology and usage[edit] The term laissez faire likely originated in a meeting that took place around 1681 between powerful French Comptroller-General of Finances Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Jean-Baptiste Colbert
and a group of French businessmen headed by M. Le Gendre
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Participatory Economics
Participatory economics, often abbreviated parecon, is an economic system based on participatory decision making as the primary economic mechanism for allocation in society. In the system the say in decision-making is proportional to the impact on a person or group of people. Participatory economics
Participatory economics
is a form of decentralized economic planning and socialism involving the common ownership of the means of production. It is a proposed alternative to contemporary capitalism and centralized planning. This economic model is primarily associated with political theorist Michael Albert
Michael Albert
and economist Robin Hahnel, who describe participatory economics as an anarchist economic vision.[1] The underlying values that parecon seeks to implement are equity, solidarity, diversity, workers' self-management and efficiency (defined as accomplishing goals without wasting valued assets)
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Direct Action
Direct action
Direct action
occurs when a group takes an action which is intended to reveal an existing problem, highlight an alternative, or demonstrate a possible solution to a social issue. This can include nonviolent and less often violent activities which target persons, groups, or property deemed offensive to the direct action participants. Examples of nonviolent direct action (also known as nonviolence, nonviolent resistance, or civil resistance) can include sit-ins, strikes, workplace occupations, blockades, protests, or hacktivism, while violent direct action may include political violence or assaults. Tactics such as sabotage and property destruction are sometimes considered violent. By contrast, electoral politics, diplomacy, negotiation, and arbitration are not usually described as direct action, as they are politically mediated
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