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Leeds Parish Church
Leeds
Leeds
Minster, or the Minster and Parish
Parish
Church of Saint Peter-at-Leeds, (formerly Leeds
Leeds
Parish
Parish
Church), in Leeds, West Yorkshire is a large Church of England
Church of England
foundation of major architectural and liturgical significance. A church is recorded on the site as early as the 7th century, although the present structure is a Gothic Revival
Gothic Revival
one, dating from the mid-19th century. It is dedicated to Saint Peter
Saint Peter
and was the Parish
Parish
Church of Leeds
Leeds
before becoming a Minster in 2012
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Florence Nightingale
Florence
Florence
Nightingale, OM, RRC, DStJ (/ˈflɒrəns ˈnaɪtɪŋɡeɪl/; 12 May 1820 – 13 August 1910) was an English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing. Nightingale came to prominence while serving as a manager of nurses trained by her during the Crimean War, where she organised the tending to wounded soldiers.[3] She gave nursing a highly favourable reputation and became an icon of Victorian culture, especially in the persona of "The Lady with the Lamp" making rounds of wounded soldiers at night.[4][5] While recent commentators have asserted Nightingale's achievements in the
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Saint Peter
Saint
Saint
Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa, Hebrew: שמעון בר יונה‎ Shim'on bar Yona, Greek: Πέτρος Petros, Coptic: ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ, translit. Petros, Latin: Petrus; r. AD 30;[1] d. between AD 64 and 68[2]), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon ( pronunciation (help·info)), according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church. Pope
Pope
Gregory I called him repeatedly the "Prince of the Apostles".[3] According to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised Peter in the "Rock of My Church" dialogue in Matthew 16:18 a special position in the Church
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Parish Church
A parish church (or parochial church) in Christianity
Christianity
is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish. In many parts of the world, especially in rural areas, the parish church may play a significant role in community activities, often allowing its premises to be used for non-religious community events. The church building reflects this status, and there is considerable variety in the size and style of parish churches. Many villages in Europe
Europe
have churches that date back to the Middle Ages, but all periods of architecture are represented.Contents1 Role 2 By denomination 3 Protestant resurgence 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingRole[edit] In England, it is the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. Nearly every part of England
England
is in a parish, and most parishes have an Anglican parish church, which is consecrated
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Listed Building
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
(officially the English Heritage
English Heritage
Trust) is a registered charity that manages the National Heritage Collection.[3] This comprises over 400 of England's historic buildings, monuments and sites spanning more than 5,000 years of history. Within its portfolio are Stonehenge, Dover Castle, Tintagel Castle
Tintagel Castle
and the best preserved parts of Hadrian's Wall
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Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
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Chichester
Chichester
Chichester
(/ˈtʃɪtʃɪstər/) is a cathedral city in West Sussex, in South-East England.[4] It is the only city in West Sussex
West Sussex
and is its county town. It has a long history as a settlement from Roman times and was important in Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
times. It is the seat of the Church of England
England
Diocese of Chichester, with a 12th-century cathedral. The city is a hub of several main road routes, and has a railway station, theatre, hospital and museums
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Sir Christopher Wren
Sir Christopher Wren
Christopher Wren
PRS (/rɛn/;[2] 30 October 1632 [O.S. 20 October] – 8 March 1723 [O.S. 25 February]) was an English anatomist, astronomer, geometer, and mathematician-physicist, as well as one of the most highly acclaimed English architects in history.[3] He was accorded responsibility for rebuilding 52 churches in the City of London
London
after the Great Fire in 1666, including what is regarded as his masterpiece, St Paul's Cathedral, on Ludgate Hill, completed in 1710. The principal creative responsibility for a number of the churches is now more commonly attributed to others in his office, especially Nicholas Hawksmoor
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St Paul's Cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of London
London
and the mother church of the Diocese
Diocese
of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill
Ludgate Hill
at the highest point of the City of London
London
and is a Grade I listed building. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604.[1] The present cathedral, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque
English Baroque
style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London.[2][page needed] The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London
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Great Fire Of London
The Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of the English city of London from Sunday, 2 September to Wednesday, 5 September 1666.[1] The fire gutted the medieval City of London
City of London
inside the old Roman city wall. It threatened but did not reach the aristocratic district of Westminster, Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums.[2] It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated to have destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the City's 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The death toll is unknown but traditionally thought to have been small, as only six verified deaths were recorded
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Edward Bouverie Pusey
Edward Bouverie Pusey
Edward Bouverie Pusey
(/ˈpjuːzi/; 22 August 1800 – 16 September 1882) was an English churchman, for more than fifty years Regius Professor of Hebrew at Christ Church, Oxford. He was one of the main promoters of Oxfordianism.Contents1 Early years 2 Fellow and professor 3 Oxford Movement 4 Controversialist 5 Later life and legacy 6 Works 7 Veneration 8 Family 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksEarly years[edit] He was born in the village of Pusey in Berkshire. His father was born Philip Bouverie (d. 1828), a younger son of Jacob des Bouverie, 1st Viscount Folkestone; he adopted the name of Pusey on succeeding to the manorial estates there. Philip Pusey was his brother; his sister Charlotte married Richard Lynch Cotton.[1][2] For preparatory education, Pusey attended the school of the Rev. Richard Roberts in Mitcham
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Allerton, West Yorkshire
Allerton is a former village in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England, now increasingly part of the Bradford
Bradford
conurbation.[1] Allerton was recorded in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
as Wilsden-cum-Allerton. The local residents of the suburb pronounce it Ollerton 'Ol' rather than 'Al'. Chellow Dene is a local beauty spot at the north of Allerton
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Armley
Armley
Armley
is a district in the west of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It starts less than 1 mile (1.6 km) from Leeds
Leeds
city centre. Like much of Leeds, Armley
Armley
grew in the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
and had several mills, one of which houses now the Leeds
Leeds
Industrial Museum at Armley
Armley
Mills
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