HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Lecco
Lecco
Lecco
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈlekko],[1][2] locally [ˈlɛkko] ( listen);[1] Lombard: Lecch [lɛk]) is a city of 48,131 inhabitants in Lombardy, northern Italy, 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of Milan, the capital of the province of Lecco. It lies at the end of the south-eastern branch of Lake Como (the branch named Lake of Lecco
Lecco
/ Lago di Lecco). The Bergamo Alps rise to the north and east, cut through by the Valsassina
Valsassina
of which Lecco
Lecco
marks the southern end. The lake narrows to form the river Adda, so bridges were built to improve road communications with Como
Como
and Milan
[...More...]

"Lecco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Comune
The comune (IPA: [koˈmune]; plural: comuni, IPA: [koˈmuni]) is a basic administrative division in Italy, roughly equivalent to a township or municipality.Contents1 Importance and function 2 Subdivisions 3 Homonymy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksImportance and function[edit] The comune provides many of the basic civil functions: registry of births and deaths, registry of deeds, and contracting for local roads and public works. It is headed by a mayor (sindaco) assisted by a legislative body, the consiglio comunale (communal council), and an executive body, the giunta comunale (communal committee). The mayor and members of the consiglio comunale are elected together by resident citizens: the coalition of the elected mayor (who needs an absolute majority in the first or second round of voting) gains three fifths of the consiglio's seats
[...More...]

"Comune" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bergamo Alps
The Bergamasque Alps
Alps
or Bergamo
Bergamo
Alps
Alps
(Italian: Alpi Orobie) are a mountain range in the Italian Alps
[...More...]

"Bergamo Alps" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Association Football
Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer,[a] is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport.[3][4][5][6] The game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal. Players are not allowed to touch the ball with outstretched hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers within their penalty area. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, but may also use any other part of their body except the hands and the arms. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout depending on the format of the competition
[...More...]

"Association Football" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Condottiere
Condottieri
Condottieri
(Italian: [kondotˈtjɛːri]; singular condottiero and condottiere) were the leaders of the professional military free companies (or mercenaries) contracted by the Italian city-states
Italian city-states
and the Papacy[1] from the late Middle Ages and throughout the Renaissance. In Renaissance
Renaissance
Italian, condottiero meant "contractor". In contemporary Italian, "condottiero" acquired the broader meaning of "military leader", not restricted to mercenaries.[2] In Italian historiography, Renaissance
Renaissance
mercenary captains are usually called capitani di ventura (literally "venture captains")
[...More...]

"Condottiere" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Duchy Of Milan
The Duchy of Milan
Milan
was a constituent state of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
in northern Italy. It was created in 1395, when it included twenty-six towns and the wide rural area of the middle Padan Plain
Padan Plain
east of the hills of Montferrat. During much of its existence, it was wedged between Savoy to the west, Venice to the east, the Swiss Confederacy to the north, and separated from the Mediterranean by Genoa to the south. The Duchy eventually fell to Habsburg Austria
Habsburg Austria
with the Treaty of Baden (1714), concluding the War of the Spanish Succession
[...More...]

"Duchy Of Milan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor
Conrad II (c. 990—4 June 1039), also known as Conrad the Elder and Conrad the Salic, was Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
from 1027 until his death in 1039. The founder of the Salian dynasty
Salian dynasty
of emperors, Conrad also served as King of Germany
King of Germany
from 1024, King of Italy
King of Italy
from 1026, and King of Burgundy
King of Burgundy
from 1033. The son of a mid-level nobleman in Franconia, Count Henry of Speyer and Adelaide of Alsace, he inherited the titles of count of Speyer
Speyer
and of Worms as an infant when his father died. Conrad extended his power beyond his inherited lands, receiving the favor of the princes of the Kingdom of Germany
[...More...]

"Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
(Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and continued until its dissolution in 1806.[6] The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.[7][8][9] On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Holy Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Otto I Of Germany
Otto I (23 November 912 – 7 May 973), traditionally known as Otto the Great (German: Otto der Große), was German king from 936 and Holy Roman Emperor from 962 until his death in 973.[b] He was the oldest son of Henry I the Fowler and Matilda. Otto inherited the Duchy of Saxony
Duchy of Saxony
and the kingship of the Germans upon his father's death in 936. He continued his father's work of unifying all German tribes into a single kingdom and greatly expanded the king's powers at the expense of the aristocracy. Through strategic marriages and personal appointments, Otto installed members of his family in the kingdom's most important duchies. This reduced the various dukes, who had previously been co-equals with the king, to royal subjects under his authority
[...More...]

"Otto I Of Germany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Marches
A march or mark was, in broad terms, a medieval European term for any kind of borderland, as opposed to a notional "heartland". More specifically, a march was a border between realms, and/or a neutral/buffer zone under joint control of two states, in which different laws might apply. In both of these senses, marches served a political purpose, such as providing warning of military incursions, or regulating cross-border trade, or both. Just as counties were traditionally ruled by counts, marches gave rise to titles such as: marquess (masculine) or marchioness (feminine) in England, marquis (masc.) or marquise (fem.) in France and Scotland, margrave (Markgraf i.e. "march count"; masc.) or margravine (Markgräfin i.e
[...More...]

"Marches" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Franks
The Franks
Franks
(Latin: Franci or Latin: gens Francorum) were a collection of Germanic peoples, whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources, associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine
Middle Rhine
in the 3rd century AD, on the edge of the Roman Empire. Later the term is associated with Romanized Germanic dynasties within the collapsing Roman Empire, who eventually commanded the whole region between the rivers Loire
Loire
and Rhine, and imposed power over many other post-Roman kingdoms and Germanic peoples, later being recognized by the Catholic church as successors to the old rulers of the Western Roman Empire.[1][2][3][a] Although the Frankish name only appears in the 3rd century, at least some of the original Frankish tribes had long been known under their own names to the Romans, both as allies providing soldiers, and as enemies
[...More...]

"Franks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lombards
The Lombards
Lombards
or Longobards (Latin: Langobardi, Italian: Longobardi [loŋɡoˈbardi], Lombard: Longobard (Western)) were a Germanic people who ruled most of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
from 568 to 774. The Lombard historian Paul the Deacon
Paul the Deacon
wrote in the Historia Langobardorum that the Lombards
Lombards
descended from a small tribe called the Winnili,[1] who dwelt in southern Scandinavia[2] (Scadanan) before migrating to seek new lands. In the 1st century AD, they formed part of the Suebi, in northwestern Germany. By the end of the 5th century, they had moved into the area roughly coinciding with modern Austria and Slovakia
Slovakia
north of the Danube
Danube
river, where they subdued the Heruls and later fought frequent wars with the Gepids
[...More...]

"Lombards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Western Roman Empire
In historiography, the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
refers to the western provinces of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
at any one time during which they were administered by a separate independent Imperial court, coequal with that administering the eastern half, then referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Western Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Castrum
In the Roman Empire, the Latin
Latin
word castrum[1] (plural castra) was a building, or plot of land, used as a fortified military camp. Castrum was the term used for different sizes of camps including a large legionary fortress, smaller auxiliary forts, temporary encampments, and "marching" forts. The diminutive form castellum was used for fortlets, typically occupied by a detachment of a cohort or a century.[2] In English, the terms Roman fortress, Roman fort, and Roman camp are commonly used for castrum
[...More...]

"Castrum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
[...More...]

"Ancient Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Celt
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
[...More...]

"Celt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.