HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Lease
A lease is a contractual arrangement calling for the lessee (user) to pay the lessor (owner) for use of an asset.[1] Property, buildings and vehicles are common assets that are leased. Industrial or business equipment is also leased. Broadly put, a lease agreement is a contract between two parties, the lessor and the lessee. The lessor is the legal owner of the asset; the lessee obtains the right to use the asset in return for regular rental payments.[2] The lessee also agrees to abide by various conditions regarding their use of the property or equipment. For example, a person leasing a car may agree that the car will only be used for personal use. The narrower term rental agreement can be used to describe a lease in which the asset is tangible property.[3] Language used is that the user rents the land or goods let out or rented out by the owner
[...More...]

"Lease" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Contract
A contract is a voluntary arrangement between two or more parties that is enforceable by law as a binding legal agreement. Contract
Contract
law recognises and governs the rights and duties arising from agreements.[1] Within jurisdictions of the civil law tradition, contract law is a branch of the law of obligations. At common law, formation of a contract generally requires an offer, acceptance, consideration, and a mutual intent to be bound
[...More...]

"Contract" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Notice
Notice
Notice
is the legal concept describing a requirement that a party be aware of legal process affecting their rights, obligations or duties. There are several types of notice: public notice (or legal notice), actual notice, constructive notice, and implied notice.Contents1 Service of process 2 Due process issues (United States) 3 Notice
Notice
and knowledge 4 See also 5 Further readingService of process[edit] At common law, notice is the fundamental principle in service of process. In this case, the service of process puts the defendant "on notice" of the allegations contained within the complaint, or other such pleading. Since notice is fundamental, a court may rule a pleading defective if it does not put the defendant on notice. In a civil case, personal jurisdiction over a defendant is obtained by service of a summons
[...More...]

"Notice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agricultural
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
[...More...]

"Agricultural" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Urban Area
An urban area is a human settlement with high population density and infrastructure of built environment. Urban areas are created through urbanization and are categorized by urban morphology as cities, towns, conurbations or suburbs. In urbanism, the term contrasts to rural areas such as villages and hamlets and in urban sociology or urban anthropology it contrasts with natural environment
[...More...]

"Urban Area" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Laissez-faire
Laissez-faire (/ˌlɛseɪˈfɛər/; French: [lɛsefɛʁ] ( listen); from French: laissez faire, lit. 'let do') is an economic system in which transactions between private parties are free from government intervention such as regulation, privileges, tariffs and subsidies. The phrase laissez-faire is part of a larger French phrase and basically translates to "let (it/them) do", but in this context usually means to "let go".[1]Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Fundamentals 3 History of laissez-faire debate3.1 Europe 3.2 United States4 Raw capitalism 5 Critiques 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further readingEtymology and usage[edit] The term laissez faire likely originated in a meeting that took place around 1681 between powerful French Comptroller-General of Finances Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Jean-Baptiste Colbert
and a group of French businessmen headed by M. Le Gendre
[...More...]

"Laissez-faire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consumerism
Consumerism
Consumerism
is a social and economic order and ideology that encourages the acquisition of goods and services in ever-increasing amounts. With the industrial revolution, but particularly in the 20th century, mass production led to an economic crisis: there was overproduction — the supply of goods would grow beyond consumer demand, and so manufacturers turned to planned obsolescence and advertising to increase consumer spending.[1] An early criticism of consumerism is Thorstein Veblen's best known book, The Theory of the Leisure Class from 1899, which critically examined newly widespread values and economic institutions emerging along with newly widespread "leisure time," at the turn of the 20th century.[2] In it Veblen "views the activities and spending habits of this leisure class in terms of conspicuous and vicarious consumption and waste
[...More...]

"Consumerism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consumer Protection
In regulatory jurisdictions that provide for this (a list including most or all developed countries with free market economies) consumer protection is a group of laws and organizations designed to ensure the rights of consumers, as well as fair trade, competition, and accurate information in the marketplace. The laws are designed to prevent the businesses that engage in fraud or specified unfair practices from gaining an advantage over competitors. They may also provide additional protection for those most vulnerable in society. Consumer protection laws are a form of government regulation that aim to protect the rights of consumers
[...More...]

"Consumer Protection" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Common Law
Common law
Common law
(also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is that body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.[1][2][3][4][5] The defining characteristic of “common law” is that it arises as precedent. In cases where the parties disagree on what the law is, a common law court looks to past precedential decisions of relevant courts, and synthesizes the principles of those past cases as applicable to the current facts. If a similar dispute has been resolved in the past, the court is usually bound to follow the reasoning used in the prior decision (a principle known as stare decisis)
[...More...]

"Common Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Statute Of Frauds
The statute of frauds refers to the requirement that certain kinds of contracts be memorialized in a writing, signed by the party to be charged, with sufficient content to evidence the contract.[1][2] Traditionally, the statute of frauds requires a signed writing in the following circumstances:Contracts in consideration of marriage. This provision covers prenuptial agreements. Contracts that cannot be performed within one year. However, contracts of indefinite duration do not fall under the statute of frauds regardless of how long the performance actually takes. Contracts for the transfer of an interest in land
[...More...]

"Statute Of Frauds" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consideration
Consideration
Consideration
is a concept of English common law and is a necessity for simple contracts but not for special contracts (contracts by deed). The court in Currie v Misa [1] declared consideration to be a “Right, Interest, Profit, Benefit, or Forbearance, Detriment, Loss, Responsibility”. Thus, consideration is a promise of something of value given by a promissor in exchange for something of value given by a promisee; and typically the thing of value is goods, money, or an act. Forbearance to act, such as an adult promising to refrain from smoking, is enforceable only if one is thereby surrendering a legal right.[2][3][4] The concept has been adopted by other common law jurisdictions, including the US. Consideration
Consideration
may be thought of as the concept of value offered and accepted by people or organisations entering into contracts
[...More...]

"Consideration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Privity Of Estate
Privity of estate is a "mutual or successive relation to the same right in property"[1] such as the relationship between a landlord and tenant. Thus, privity of estate refers to the legal relationship that two parties bear when their estates constitute one estate in law. Privity of estate involves rights and duties that run with the land if original parties intend to bind successors, and the rights touch and concern the land. A tenant generally cannot transfer the tenancy or privity of estate between himself and his landlord without the landlord's consent. An assignee who comes into privity of estate is liable only while he continues to be the legal assignee: while he is in possession under the assignment.[2] Privity of estate traces the land of plaintiff and defendant back to a common owner, who imposed the restriction on the land's use. That is referred to as "vertical privity." See also[edit]Privity of contractNotes[edit]^ Barron's Law Dictionary, p
[...More...]

"Privity Of Estate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Causation (law)
Causation is the "causal relationship between conduct and result". In other words, causation provides a means of connecting conduct with a resulting effect, typically an injury. In criminal law, it is defined as the actus reus (an action) from which the specific injury or other effect arose and is combined with mens rea (a state of mind) to comprise the elements of guilt. Causation only applies where a result has been achieved and therefore is immaterial with regard to inchoate offenses.Contents1 Background concepts1.1 Relationship between causation and liability2 Establishing causation 3 Establishing factual causation 4 Establishing legal causation4.1 Proximate cause 4.2 Intervening cause 4.3 Independent sufficient causes 4.4 Summers v. Tice
Summers v

[...More...]

"Causation (law)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Operation Of Law
The phrase "by operation of law" is a legal term that indicates that a right or liability has been created for a party, irrespective of the intent of that party, because it is dictated by existing legal principles. For example, if a person dies without a will, his or her heirs are determined by operation of law. Similarly, if a person marries or has a child after his or her will has been executed, the law writes this pretermitted spouse or pretermitted heir into the will if no provision for this situation was specifically included
[...More...]

"Operation Of Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trespasser
In the law of tort, property, and criminal law a trespasser is a person who commits the act of trespassing on a property, that is, without the permission of the owner. Being present on land as a trespasser thereto creates liability in the trespasser, so long as the trespass is intentional
[...More...]

"Trespasser" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Statute Of Frauds
The statute of frauds refers to the requirement that certain kinds of contracts be memorialized in a writing, signed by the party to be charged, with sufficient content to evidence the contract.[1][2] Traditionally, the statute of frauds requires a signed writing in the following circumstances:Contracts in consideration of marriage. This provision covers prenuptial agreements. Contracts that cannot be performed within one year. However, contracts of indefinite duration do not fall under the statute of frauds regardless of how long the performance actually takes. Contracts for the transfer of an interest in land
[...More...]

"Statute Of Frauds" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.