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Le Havre
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Le Havre
Le Havre
(UK: /lə ˈhɑːvrə/;[3] French: [lə ɑvʁ] ( listen)), historically called in English Newhaven, is an urban French commune and city in the Seine-Maritime
Seine-Maritime
department in the Normandy
Normandy
region of northwestern France. It is situated on the right bank of the estuary of the river Seine
Seine
on the Channel southwest of the Pays de Caux. Modern Le Havre
Le Havre
remains deeply influenced by its employment and maritime traditions. Its port is the second largest in France, after that of Marseille, for total traffic, and the largest French container port
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Trente Glorieuses
Les Trente Glorieuses (French pronunciation: ​[le tʁɑ̃t ɡlɔʁjøz], "The Glorious Thirty") refers to the thirty years from 1945 to 1975 following the end of the Second World War
Second World War
in France. The name was first used by the French demographer Jean Fourastié. Fourastié coined the term in 1979 with the publication of his book Les Trente Glorieuses, ou la révolution invisible de 1946 à 1975 ("The Glorious Thirty, or the Invisible Revolution from 1946 to 1975"). The term is derived from Les Trois Glorieuses ("The Glorious Three"), the three days of revolution on 27–29 July 1830 in France. Over this thirty-year period, France's economy grew rapidly like economies of other developed countries within the framework of the Marshall Plan
Marshall Plan
such as West Germany, Italy
Italy
and Japan
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Population Without Double Counting
Population without double counting is an English translation of the French phrase Population sans doubles comptes. In France, for the purposes of the census, the INSEE has defined several population indicators that allow people who live in more than one place to be counted in each place, to study and keep count of population movement. So each commune in France
France
does not have only one figure for the population, but several; for example students may be counted both where they study and where they live when not studying
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Subprefectures In France
In France, a subprefecture (French: sous-préfecture) is the administrative center of a departmental arrondissement that does not contain the prefecture for its department. The term also applies to the building that houses the administrative headquarters for an arrondissement. The civil servant in charge of a subprefecture is the subprefect, assisted by a general secretary
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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Central European Summer Time
Central European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time
Central European Time
(UTC+1) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+2, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time
South African Standard Time
and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.Contents1 Names 2 Period of observation 3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesNames[edit] Other names which have been applied to Central European Summer Time are Middle European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(MEST), Central European Daylight Saving Time (CEDT), and Bravo Time (after the second letter of the NATO phonetic alphabet)
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UTC+2
UTC+02:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +02. In ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-06T10:17:05+02:00
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INSEE Code
The INSEE code is a numerical indexing code used by the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) to identify various entities, including communes, départements. They are also used as national identification numbers given to people.Contents1 Created under Vichy 2 National identification numbers 3 History 4 SIREN and SIRET codes 5 Geographical codes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCreated under Vichy[edit]This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Les Républicains
The Republicans (French: Les Républicains; LR) is a centre-right political party in France. The party was formed on 30 May 2015 by renaming the Union for a Popular Movement (UMP) party, which had been founded in 2002 under the leadership of former President of France
France
Jacques Chirac.[15][16] The party used to be one of the two major political parties in the French Fifth Republic along with the centre-left Socialist Party (PS)
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Estuary
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene
Holocene
epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
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Marseille-Fos Port
Marseille Fos Port (French: Grand port maritime de Marseille, or Great Seaport of Marseille) is the main trade seaport of France. In 2011, the port had an overall traffic of 88 million tons. It was also one of the 15 world's largest cruise ports and the fifth-largest in the Mediterranean. It has two main sites: in northern Marseille from La Joliette to l'Estaque as well as in Fos-sur-Mer, about 50 km (31 mi) north west of Marseille. The port generates 45,000 jobs and €4 billion according to an OECD study.[1] The port is the biggest French port, the second Mediterranean port and the fourth European port, making it the 41st port in the world in 2014, transporting 85,997,000 tons of goods. History[edit] Historically the local port was the Old Port of Marseille. In the 1840s, maritime traffic becomes too intense for the Old Port capacities and an extension seemed necessary
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Intermodal Container
An intermodal container is a large standardized shipping container, designed and built for intermodal freight transport, meaning these containers can be used across different modes of transport – from ship to rail to truck – without unloading and reloading their cargo.[1] Intermodal containers are primarily used to store and transport materials and products efficiently and securely in the global containerized intermodal freight transport system, but smaller numbers are in regional use as well
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Episcopal See
An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.[1][2] Phrases concerning actions occurring within or outside an episcopal see are indicative of the geographical significance of the term, making it synonymous with "diocese".[3][4][5][6] The word "see" is derived from Latin
Latin
sedes, which in its original or proper sense denotes the seat or chair that, in the case of a bishop, is the earliest symbol of the bishop's authority.[7] This symbolic chair is also known as the bishop's cathedra, and is placed in the diocese principal church, which for that reason is called the bishop's cathedral, from Latin
Latin
ecclesia cathedralis, meaning the church of the cathedra
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Reims
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Reims
Reims
(/riːmz/; also spelled Rheims; French: [ʁɛ̃s]), a city in the Grand Est
Grand Est
region of France, lies 129 km (80 mi) east-northeast of Paris. The 2013 census recorded 182,592 inhabitants (Rémoises (feminine) and Rémois (masculine)) in the city of Reims proper (the commune), and 317,611 inhabitants in the metropolitan area (aire urbaine). Its river, the Vesle, is a tributary of the Aisne. Founded by the Gauls, it became a major city during the period of the Roman Empire.[1] Reims
Reims
played a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the crowning of the kings of France
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