HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Laurent Joubert
Laurent Joubert
Laurent Joubert
(16 December 1529, Dauphiné, France - 21 October 1582, near Montpellier, France) was a French physician. He travelled to Montpellier
Montpellier
at the age of 21 to study medicine, and became a student of Guillaume Rondelet, the chancellor of the Medical Faculty at the University of Montpellier. Soon after Rondelet's death in 1556, Joubert succeeded him as chancellor. He was later summoned by Catherine de' Medici, the queen consort of France, to be her personal physician. Joubert went on to become one of the physicians to Henry III of France. Joubert was married to Louise Guichard, the sister of the doctor to the King of Navarre.[1]Contents1 Works 2 Notes 3 References 4 External links and sourcesWorks[edit] Joubert was a significant figure in a movement that sought to challenge medical superstitions and ignorance in France
[...More...]

"Laurent Joubert" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dauphiné
The Dauphiné
Dauphiné
(/ˌdoʊfiːˈneɪ/ or /ˈdoʊfɪneɪ/; French pronunciation: [do.fi.ne]) or Dauphiné
Dauphiné
Viennois, formerly Dauphiny in English, is a former province in southeastern France, whose area roughly corresponded to that of the present departments of Isère, Drôme, and Hautes-Alpes. The Dauphiné
Dauphiné
was originally the County of Albon. In the 12th century, the local ruler Count Guigues IV of Albon (c.1095–1142) bore a dolphin on his coat of arms and was nicknamed "le Dauphin" (French for dolphin). His descendants changed their title from Count of Albon to Dauphin of Viennois. The state took the name of Dauphiné
[...More...]

"Dauphiné" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Manchester University Press
Manchester University Press
Manchester University Press
is the university press of the University of Manchester, England
England
and a publisher of academic books and journals. Manchester University Press
Manchester University Press
has developed into an international publisher. It maintains its links with the University.Contents1 Publishing1.1 Open access2 History 3 References 4 External linksPublishing[edit]Old Medical School on Coupland Street (photographed in 1908)--one of the buildings which have housed the Press Manchester University Press
Manchester University Press
publishes monographs and textbooks for academic teaching in higher education. It produces around 140 new books annually
[...More...]

"Manchester University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
[...More...]

"SNAC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Biblioteca Nacional De España
The Biblioteca Nacional de España
Biblioteca Nacional de España
(National Library of Spain) is a major public library, the largest in Spain, and one of the largest in the world. It is located in Madrid, on the Paseo de Recoletos.Contents1 History 2 The library today 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 ImagesHistory[edit] The library was founded by King Philip V in 1712 as the Palace Public Library (Biblioteca Pública de Palacio). The Royal Letters Patent that he granted, the predecessor of the current legal deposit requirement, made it mandatory for printers to submit a copy of every book printed in Spain
Spain
to the library. In 1836, the library's status as Crown property was revoked and ownership was transferred to the Ministry of Governance (Ministerio de la Gobernación)
[...More...]

"Biblioteca Nacional De España" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
[...More...]

"Bibliothèque Nationale De France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
[...More...]

"Système Universitaire De Documentation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress Control Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Montpellier
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Montpellier
Montpellier
(pronounced [mɔ̃pəlje, -pɛ-] ( listen);[1][2] Occitan: Montpelhièr [mumpeˈʎɛ]) is a city in southern France. It is the capital of the Hérault department. Montpellier
Montpellier
is the 7th-largest city of France, and is also the fastest-growing city in the country over the past 25 years. In 2014, 589,610 people live in the urban area and 275,318 in the city itself
[...More...]

"Montpellier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Guy De Chauliac
Guy de Chauliac
Guy de Chauliac
(French: [də ʃoljak]), also called Guido or Guigo de Cauliaco (c. 1300 – 25 July 1368), was a French physician and surgeon who wrote a lengthy and influential treatise on surgery in Latin, titled Chirurgia Magna. It was translated into many other languages (including Middle English) and widely read by physicians in late medieval Europe.Contents1 Life1.1 Life during the Black Death
Black Death
era2 Works2.1 Chirurgia magna2.1.1 Emphasis on anatomy2.2 Other works3 References 4 SourcesLife[edit] Guy de Chauliac
Guy de Chauliac
was in born in Chaulhac, Lozère, France, into a family of modest means.[1] He began his study of medicine in Toulouse before going to study in Montpellier, the center for medical knowledge in the 14th century of France
[...More...]

"Guy De Chauliac" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

King Of Navarre
This is a list of the kings and queens of Pamplona, later Navarre. Pamplona
Pamplona
was the primary name of the kingdom until its union with Aragon (1076–1134)
[...More...]

"King Of Navarre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Henry III Of France
Henry III (19 September 1551 – 2 August 1589; born Alexandre Édouard de France, Polish: Henryk Walezy, Lithuanian: Henrikas Valua) was King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
from 1573 to 1575 and King of France
King of France
from 1574 until his death. He was the last French monarch of the House of Valois. As the fourth son of King Henry II of France, he was not expected to inherit the French throne and thus was a good candidate for the vacant throne of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, where he was elected King/Grand Duke in 1573. During his brief rule, he signed the Henrician Articles into law, recognizing the Polish nobility's right to freely elect their monarch
[...More...]

"Henry III Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Catherine De' Medici
Catherine de' Medici
Medici
(Italian: Caterina de' Medici, pronounced [kateˈriːna de ˈmɛːditʃi]; French: Catherine de Médicis, pronounced [katʁin də medisis]; 13 April 1519 – 5 January 1589), daughter of Lorenzo II de' Medici
Lorenzo II de' Medici
and of Madeleine de La Tour d'Auvergne, was an Italian noblewoman who was queen of France
France
from 1547 until 1559, by marriage to King Henry II. As the mother of kings Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III, she had extensive, if at times varying, influence in the political life of France. From 1560 to 1563, she ruled France
France
as regent for her son Charles IX, King of France. In 1533, at the age of fourteen, Catherine married Henry, second son of King Francis I and Queen Claude of France
[...More...]

"Catherine De' Medici" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.