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Laura Ingraham
Laura Anne Ingraham (born June 19, 1963) is an American conservative television and radio talk show host.[1] She hosts the nationally syndicated radio show, The Laura Ingraham
Laura Ingraham
Show, is the editor-in-chief of LifeZette, and host of The Ingraham Angle
The Ingraham Angle
on Fox News.[2]Contents1 Early life1.1 Outing of gay students at Dartmouth2 Career2.1 Radio show host 2.2 Ingraham Angle2.2.1 Criticism and controversies2.3 LifeZette 2.4 Books3 Political views 4 Personal life 5 References 6 See also 7 External linksEarly life Ingraham grew up in Glastonbury, Connecticut, where she was born to Anne Caroline (née Kozak) and James Frederick Ingraham III.[3] Her maternal grandparents were Polish immigrants, and her father was of Irish and English ancestry.[4] She graduated from Glastonbury High School in 1981. Ingraham earned a B.A
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John R. Bolton
John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948) is an American diplomat, attorney, and the National Security Advisor-designate of the United States. He is expected to begin his tenure as National Security Advisor on April 9, 2018. His political views have been described as American nationalist[2][3] and conservative.[4][5][6][7] Bolton served as the United States Ambassador to the United Nations
United States Ambassador to the United Nations
from August 2005 to December 2006 as a recess appointee by President George W
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Southern Agrarians
The Southern Agrarians (also the Twelve Southerners, the Vanderbilt Agrarians, the Nashville Agrarians, the Tennessee Agrarians, and the Fugitive Agrarians) were a group of twelve American writers, poets, essayists, and novelists, all with roots in the Southern United States, who united to write a pro–Southern agrarian manifesto, published as the essay collection I’ll Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition
Tradition
(1930).[1] The
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Natural Law
Natural law
Natural law
(Latin: ius naturale, lex naturalis) is a philosophy asserting that certain rights are inherent by virtue of human nature, endowed by nature—traditionally by God
God
or a transcendent source—and that these can be understood universally through human reason. As determined by nature, the law of nature is implied to be universal,[1] existing independently of the positive law of a given state, political order, legislature or society at large. Historically, natural law refers to the use of reason to analyze human nature to deduce binding rules of moral behavior from nature's or God's creation of reality and mankind. The concept of natural law was first documented in ancient Greek philosophy, including Aristotle,[2] and was referred to in Roman philosophy
Roman philosophy
by Cicero
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Rule Of Law
The rule of law is the principle that law should govern a nation, as opposed to being governed by decisions of individual government officials. It primarily refers to the influence and authority of law within society, particularly as a constraint upon behaviour, including behaviour of government officials.[2] The phrase can be traced back to 16th century Britain, and in the following century the Scottish theologian Samuel Rutherford
Samuel Rutherford
used the phrase in his argument against the divine right of kings.[3] John Locke
John Locke
wrote that freedom in society means being subject only to laws made by a legislature that apply to everyone, with a person being otherwise free from both governmental and private restrictions upon liberty. The "rule of law" was further popularized in the 19th century by British jurist A. V. Dicey
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Small Government
Small government
Small government
is a term generally used in liberalism, especially by political conservatives and libertarians to describe a government with minimal involvement in certain areas of public policy or the private sector, especially matters considered to be private or personal
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Tradition
A tradition is a belief or behavior passed down within a group or society with symbolic meaning or special significance with origins in the past.[1][2] Common examples include holidays or impractical but socially meaningful clothes (like lawyers' wigs or military officers' spurs), but the idea has also been applied to social norms such as greetings. Traditions can persist and evolve for thousands of years—the word "tradition" itself derives from the Latin
Latin
tradere literally meaning to transmit, to hand over, to give for safekeeping. While it is commonly assumed that traditions have ancient history, many traditions have been invented on purpose, whether that be political or cultural, over short periods of time. Various academic disciplines also use the word in a variety of ways. One way tradition is used more simply, often in academic work but elsewhere also, is to indicate the quality of a piece of information being discussed
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History Of Conservatism In The United States
Conservatism
Conservatism
is a political and social philosophy promoting traditional social institutions in the context of culture and civilization. The central tenets of conservatism include tradition, human imperfection, organic society, hierarchy and authority and property rights.[1] Conservatives seek to preserve a range of institutions such as monarchy, religion, parliamentary government and property rights with the aim of emphasizing social stability and continuity[2] while the more extreme elements called reactionaries oppose modernism and seek a return to "the way things were".[3][4] The first established use of the term in a political context originated in 1818 with François-René de Chateaubriand[5] during the period of Bourbon restoration
Bourbon restoration
that sought to roll back the policies of the French Revolution
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Conservative Coalition
The conservative coalition was an unofficial Congressional coalition bringing together a conservative majority of the Republican Party and the conservative, mostly Southern, wing of the Democratic Party. According to James T. Patterson: "By and large the congressional conservatives by 1939 agreed in opposing the spread of federal power and bureaucracy, in denouncing deficit spending, in criticizing industrial labor unions, and in excoriating most welfare programs. They sought to "conserve" an America which they believed to have existed before 1933."[1] The coalition was dominant in Congress from 1937 to 1963 and remained a political force until the mid-1980s, eventually dying out in the 1990s when few conservative Democrats remained in Congress.[2] In terms of Congressional roll call votes, it primarily appeared on votes affecting labor unions
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New Right
New Right is used in several countries as a descriptive term for various policies or groups that are right-wing. It has also been used to describe the emergence of Eastern European parties after the collapse of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and of systems using Soviet-style communism.[1]Contents1 New Right by country1.1 Australia 1.2 Brazil 1.3 Chile 1.4 France 1.5 Germany 1.6 Greece 1.7 Netherlands 1.8 New Zealand 1.9 Poland 1.10 South Korea 1.11 United Kingdom 1.12 United States1.12.1 First New Right 1.12.2 Second New Right 1.12.3 Third New Right2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External links New Right by country[edit] Australia[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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List Of Prominent American Conservatives
American(s) may refer to:American, something of, from, or related to the United StatesAmericans, citizens of the United States American
American
ancestry, people who self-identify their ancestry as "American" American
American
English, the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States Native <
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Limited Government
In political philosophy, limited government is where governmental power is restricted by law, usually in a written constitution. It is a key concept in the history of liberalism. The Magna Carta
Magna Carta
and the United States Constitution
Constitution
represent important milestones in the limiting of governmental power
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Elliott Abrams
Elliott Abrams
Elliott Abrams
(born January 24, 1948) is an American diplomat, lawyer and political scientist who served in foreign policy positions for Presidents Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
and George W. Bush.[2] Abrams was convicted of withholding information from Congress about the Iran–Contra affair while serving under Reagan, but was pardoned by President George H. W. Bush.[3] He is currently a senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.[4] Additionally, Abrams holds positions on the Committee for Peace and Security in the Gulf (CPSG), Center for Security Policy & National Secretary Advisory Council, Committee for a Free Lebanon, and the Project for the New American Century.[5] Abrams is a current member of the U.S
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Roger Ailes
Roger Eugene Ailes (May 15, 1940 – May 18, 2017) was an American television executive and media consultant. He was the Chairman
Chairman
and CEO of Fox News
Fox News
and the Fox Television Stations
Fox Television Stations
Group, from which he resigned in July 2016. Ailes was a media consultant for Republican presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, and for Rudy Giuliani's first mayoral campaign
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Samuel Alito
Samuel Anthony Alito Jr. (/əˈliːtoʊ/; born April 1, 1950) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He was nominated by President George W. Bush
George W. Bush
and has served on the court since January 31, 2006.[2] Raised in Hamilton Township, New Jersey
New Jersey
and educated at Princeton University and Yale Law School, Alito served as U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey
New Jersey
and a judge on the United States
United States
Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit before joining the Supreme Court. He is the 110th Justice, the second Italian American, and the eleventh Roman Catholic to serve on the court. Alito is considered "one of the most conservative justices on the Court".[3] He has described himself as a "practical originalist".[4] Alito's majority opinions in landmark cases include McDonald v. Chicago and Burwell v
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Dick Armey
Richard Keith Armey (/ˈɑːrmi/; born July 7, 1940) is an American economist and politician. He was a U.S. Representative from Texas' 26th congressional district (1985–2003) and House Majority Leader (1995–2003). He was one of the engineers of the "Republican Revolution" of the 1990s, in which Republicans were elected to majorities of both houses of Congress for the first time in four decades. Armey was one of the chief authors of the Contract with America. Armey is also an author and former economics professor. After his retirement from Congress, he has worked as a consultant, advisor, and lobbyist.Contents1 Early life, education and career 2 U.S
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