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Laughing On The Outside
" Laughing on the Outside (Crying on the Inside)" is a popular song. The music was written by Bernie Wayne, the lyrics by Ben Raleigh
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Popular Music
Popular music
Popular music
is music with wide appeal[1][2][3] that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training.[1] It stands in contrast to both art music[4][5][6] and traditional or "folk" music. Art music
Art music
was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings
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Mixed Emotions (1951 Song)
"Mixed Emotions" is a popular song by Stuart F. Louchheim, published in 1951. The best-known version of the song was recorded by Rosemary Clooney on Columbia Records in 1951. It reached #22 in the United States.[1] The song was covered by Ella Fitzgerald, as one side of a single whose other side was also a cover of a Rosemary Clooney hit, "Come On-a My House," on Decca Records (catalog number 27680[2]). Instrumental version was covered by Earl Grant on his album Yes Sirree! Dinah Washington recorded the song twice, once in the early 1950s, and again in 1961. Anita Bryant released a version of the song that was the B-side to her 1960 hit "Paper Roses". References[edit]^ Rosemary Clooney, "Mixed Emotions" Chart Position Retrieved July 19, 2013 ^ Decca Records in the 27500 to 27999 seriesThis 1950s pop song-related article is a stub
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Joel Whitburn
Joel Carver Whitburn (born November 29, 1939) is an American author and music historian. Work[edit] Whitburn founded Record Research Inc. in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, in 1970 and put together a team of researchers to examine in detail all of Billboard's music and video charts. Record Research publishes reference books based on data from the various popular music charts and to date has published over 200 books, 50 of which are currently in the Record Research catalogue. His flagship publication is Top Pop Singles, which covers the history of Billboard's popular music charts. Featuring each recording's peak position, date charted, weeks charted, label and information, and trivia on recordings and artists, Whitburn's books are used extensively by the entertainment industry (especially radio DJs) and music fans worldwide
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A-side And B-side
The terms A-side and B-side
A-side and B-side
refer to the two sides of 78, 45, and 33 1/3 rpm phonograph records, whether singles, extended plays (EPs), or long-playing (LP) records. The A-side usually featured the recording that the artist, record producer, or the record company intended to receive the initial promotional effort and then receive radio airplay, hopefully, to become a "hit" record. The B-side (or "flip-side") is a secondary recording that has a history of its own: some artists released B-sides that were considered as strong as the A-side and became hits in their own right
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Song
A song, most broadly, is a single (and often standalone) work of music that is typically intended to be sung by the human voice with distinct and fixed pitches and patterns using sound and silence and a variety of forms that often include the repetition of sections. Written words created specifically for music or for which music is specifically created, are called lyrics. If a pre-existing poem is set to composed music in classical music it is an art song. Songs that are sung on repeated pitches without distinct contours and patterns that rise and fall are called chants. Songs in a simple style that are learned informally are often referred to as folk songs. Songs that are composed for professional singers who sell their recordings or live shows to the mass market are called popular songs. These songs, which have broad appeal, are often composed by professional songwriters, composers and lyricists
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Ella Fitzgerald
Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996) was an American jazz singer often referred to as the First Lady of Song, Queen of Jazz, and Lady Ella. She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and a "horn-like" improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing. After tumultuous teenage years, Fitzgerald found stability in musical success with the Chick Webb
Chick Webb
Orchestra, performing across the country, but most often associated with the Savoy Ballroom
Savoy Ballroom
in Harlem. Fitzgerald's rendition of the nursery rhyme "A-Tisket, A-Tasket" helped boost both her and Webb to national fame
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Gun Crazy
Gun Crazy
Gun Crazy
(also known as Deadly Is the Female)[1] is a 1950 film noir directed by Joseph H. Lewis, and produced by Frank King and Maurice King. The production features Peggy Cummins
Peggy Cummins
and John Dall
John Dall
in a story about the crime-spree of a gun-toting husband and wife.[2] The screenplay by blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo—credited to Millard Kaufman because of the blacklist—and by MacKinlay Kantor
MacKinlay Kantor
was based upon a short story by Kantor published in 1940 in The Saturday Evening Post
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RCA Victor Records
RCA
RCA
Records is an American record label owned by Sony
Sony
Music, a subsidiary of Sony
Sony
Corporation of America. It is one of Sony
Sony
Music Entertainment's three flagship record labels, alongside Columbia Records and Epic Records. The label has released multiple genres of music, including pop, rock, hip hop, electronic, R&B, blues, jazz, and country. The company's name is derived from the initials of the label's defunct parent company, the Radio Corporation of America[1] (RCA). It is the second oldest recording company in US history, after sister label Columbia Records. RCA's Canadian
Canadian
unit (formerly Berliner Gramophone Canada, then RCA
RCA
Victor Company Ltd. Canada), is Sony's oldest label in Canada
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Do-Re-Mi
"Do-Re-Mi" is a show tune from the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The Sound of Music. Within the story, it is used by Maria to teach the notes of the major musical scale to the Von Trapp children who learn to sing for the first time, even though their father disallowed frivolity after their mother's death. Each syllable of the musical solfège system appears in the song's lyrics, sung on the pitch it names. Rodgers was helped in its creation by long-time arranger Trude Rittmann who devised the extended vocal sequence in the song. According to assistant conductor Peter Howard, the heart of the number – in which Maria assigns a musical tone to each child, like so many Swiss bell ringers – was devised in rehearsal by Rittmann (who was credited for choral arrangements) and choreographer Joe Layton. The fourteen note and tune lyric – 'when you know the notes to sing...' – were provided by Rodgers and Hammerstein; the rest, apparently, came from Rittmann
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Capitol Records
Capitol Records
Capitol Records
(also referred to simply as Capitol and Hollywood
Hollywood
and Vine) is an American major record label which operates as a division of the Capitol Music Group. The label was founded as the first West Coast-based record label in the United States
United States
in 1942 by industry insiders Johnny Mercer, Buddy DeSylva
Buddy DeSylva
and Glenn E. Wallichs. In 1955, the label was acquired by the British music conglomerate EMI
EMI
as its North American subsidiary.[1] EMI
EMI
was later acquired by Universal Music Group in 2012 and was merged with the company in 2013, making Capitol Records
Capitol Records
and the Capitol Music Group
Capitol Music Group
both a part of the Universal Music
Universal Music
Group
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Billboard (magazine)
Billboard (styled as billboard) is an American entertainment media brand owned by the Billboard-Hollywood Reporter Media Group, a division of Eldridge Industries. It publishes pieces involving news, video, opinion, reviews, events, and style. It is also known for its music charts, including the Billboard Hot 100
Billboard Hot 100
and Billboard 200, tracking the most popular singles and albums in different genres. It also hosts events, owns a publishing firm, and operates several TV shows. Billboard was founded in 1894 by William Donaldson and James Hennegan as a trade publication for bill posters. Donaldson later acquired Hennegen's interest in 1900 for $500. In the early years of the 20th century, it covered the entertainment industry, such as circuses, fairs, and burlesque shows. It also created a mail service for travelling entertainers. Billboard began focusing more on the music industry as the jukebox, phonograph, and radio became commonplace
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Columbia Records
Columbia Records
Columbia Records
is an American major record label owned by Sony
Sony
Music Entertainment through Sony
Sony
Entertainment, both are subsidiaries of Sony Corporation
Sony Corporation
of America, the United States division of Sony Corporation. It was founded in 1887 from an earlier enterprise named the American Graphophone
Graphophone
Company, the successor to the Volta Graphophone
Graphophone
Company.[1] From 1961 to 1990, Columbia's recordings were released outside the U.S. and Canada under the name CBS
CBS
Records to avoid being confused with the Columbia Graphophone Company
Columbia Graphophone Company
in the UK
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Billy Williams (singer)
Wilfred Williams (December 28, 1910 – July 16, 1984) was an African-American
African-American
singer. He had a successful cover recording of Fats Waller's "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Write Myself A Letter" in 1957. The record sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[2] His trademark hook for his songs was to shout "Oh, Yeah" at the end of lyrics.[citation needed]Contents1 Early years 2 Military service 3 Career 4 Later years 5 Personal life 6 Death 7 Discography7.1 Charted singles8 References 9 External linksEarly years[edit] A Methodist minister's son, Williams was born in Waco, Texas. His early youth was spent in Texas, before the family moved to Ohio. Growing up, he sang in choirs at churches where his father was the pastor, with his mother often serving as choir director
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Sammy Kaye
Sammy Kaye
Sammy Kaye
(March 13, 1910 – June 2, 1987), born Samuel Zarnocay, Jr., was an American bandleader and songwriter, whose tag line, "Swing and sway with Sammy Kaye", became one of the most famous of the Big Band Era. His signature tune was "Harbor Lights".Contents1 Biography 2 Television 3 Death 4 In popular culture 5 Discography 6 Compositions 7 Filmography 8 Legacy 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksBiography[edit] Kaye, born in Lakewood, Ohio, graduated from Rocky River High School in Rocky River, Ohio.[1] At Ohio
Ohio
University in Athens, Ohio
Ohio
he was a member of Theta Chi
Theta Chi
Fraternity
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The Battle Hymn Of The Republic
The "Battle Hymn
Hymn
of the Republic", also known as "Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory" outside of the United States, is a lyric by the American writer Julia Ward Howe
Julia Ward Howe
using the music from the song "John Brown's Body". Howe’s more famous lyrics were written in November 1861, and first published in The Atlantic Monthly
The Atlantic Monthly
in February 1862. The song links the judgment of the wicked at the end of the age (Old Testament, Isaiah 63; New Testament, Rev. 19) with the American Civil War
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