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Lathyrus Clymenum
Lathyrus
Lathyrus
clymenum, also called Spanish vetchling,[2] is a flowering plant in the Fabaceae
Fabaceae
family, native to the Mediterranean. The seeds are used to prepare a Greek dish called fava santorinis. The plant is cultivated on the island of Santorini
Santorini
in Greece
Greece
and was recently added to the European Union's products with a Protected Designation of Origin. For 3,500 years residents of Santorini
Santorini
and neighbouring islands have been cultivating the legume species Lathyrus
Lathyrus
clymenum, known elsewhere only as a wild plant.[3] The peculiar ecosystem that was created by the volcanic explosions on Santorini
Santorini
island, the volcanic ash, the cellular soil, and the combination of humidity created by the sea and the drought, make the bean a unique resource
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Honey
Honey
Honey
is a sweet, viscous food substance produced by bees and some related insects.[1] Bees produce honey from the sugary secretions of plants (floral nectar) or other insects (aphid honeydew) through regurgitation, enzymatic activity, and water evaporation
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Germplasm Resources Information Network
Germplasm
Germplasm
Resources Information Network or GRIN is an online USDA National Genetic Resources Program software project to comprehensively manage the computer database for the holdings of all plant germplasm collected by the National Plant Germplasm
Germplasm
System.[1] GRIN has extended its role to manage information on the germplasm reposits of insect (invertebrate), microbial, and animal species (see Sub-Projects).[2]Contents1 Description 2 Sub-projects 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The site is a resource for identifying taxonomic information (scientific names) as well as common names[3] on more than 500,000 accessions (distinct varieties, cultivars etc.) of plants covering 10,000 species;[4][5] both economically important ones[3] and wild species
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Agricultural Research Service
The Agricultural Research Service
Agricultural Research Service
(ARS) is the principal in-house research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA). ARS is one of four agencies in USDA's Research, Education and Economics mission area. ARS is charged with extending the nation's scientific knowledge and solving agricultural problems through its four national program areas: nutrition, food safety and quality; animal production and protection; natural resources and sustainable agricultural systems; and crop production and protection. ARS research focuses on solving problems affecting Americans every day. ARS has more than 2,200 permanent scientists working on approximately 1,100 research projects at more than 100 locations across the country, with a few locations in other countries
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United States Department Of Agriculture
The United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA), also known as the Agriculture Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, agriculture, forestry, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and internationally. Approximately 80% of the USDA's $141 billion budget goes to the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) program
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Ancient Greek Cuisine
Ancient Greek cuisine
Greek cuisine
was characterized by its frugality, reflecting agricultural hardship. It was founded on the "Mediterranean triad": wheat, olive oil, and wine.[1] Modern knowledge of ancient Greek cuisine
Greek cuisine
and eating habits is derived from literary and artistic evidence
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Ancient Greece And Wine
The influence of wine in ancient Greece helped Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
trade with neighboring countries and regions. Many mannerisms and cultural aspects were associated with wine. It led to great change in Ancient Greece as well.“ The peoples of the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
began to emerge from barbarism when they learned to cultivate the olive and the vine.[1] ”The ancient Greeks pioneered new methods of viticulture and wine production that they shared with early winemaking communities in what are now France, Italy, Austria and Russia, as well as others, through trade and colonization
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Byzantine Cuisine
Byzantine cuisine
Byzantine cuisine
(Greek: βυζαντινή κουζίνα) was marked by a merger of Greek and Roman gastronomy. The development of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and trade brought in spices, sugar and new vegetables to Greece. Cooks experimented with new combinations of food, creating two styles in the process. These were the Eastern ( Asia Minor
Asia Minor
and the Eastern Aegean), consisting of Byzantine cuisine
Byzantine cuisine
supplemented by trade items, and a leaner style primarily based on local Greek culture.Contents1 Diet 2 Drink 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksDiet[edit] Byzantine food consumption varied by class. The Imperial Palace was a metropolis of spices and exotic recipes; guests were entertained with fruits, honey-cakes and syrupy sweetmeats. Ordinary people ate more conservatively
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Basil
Basil
Basil
UK: /ˈbæzəl/;[1] US: /ˈbeɪzəl/[2] ( Ocimum
Ocimum
basilicum), also called great basil or Saint-Joseph's-wort, is a culinary herb of the family Lamiaceae
Lamiaceae
(mints). The name "basil" comes from Latin, Basilius, and Greek βασιλικόν φυτόν (basilikón phutón), "royal/kingly plant".[3] Basil
Basil
is native to tropical regions from central Africa to Southeast Asia.[4] It is a tender plant, and is used in cuisines worldwide. Depending on the species and cultivar, the leaves may taste somewhat like anise, with a strong, pungent, often sweet smell. There are many varieties of Ocimum
Ocimum
basilicum, as well as several related species or hybrids also called basil. The type used commonly as a flavor is typically called sweet basil (or Genovese basil), as opposed to Thai basil
Thai basil
(O. basilicum var
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Dill
Dill
Dill
(Anethum graveolens) is an annual herb in the celery family Apiaceae. It is the only species in the genus Anethum. Dill
Dill
is widely grown in Eurasia where its leaves and seeds are used as a herb or spice for flavouring food.Contents1 Growth 2 Etymology 3 Culinary use3.1 European cuisine 3.2 Asian and Middle Eastern cooking 3.3 Middle East uses 3.4 Other regional cooking4 Traditional Uses 5 Medicinal Uses, Effectiveness, and Safety[13] 6 Cultivation 7 Companion planting 8 Aroma profile 9 Toxicology 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksGrowth[edit] Dill
Dill
grows up to 40–60 cm (16–24 in), with slender hollow stems and alternate, finely divided, softly delicate leaves 10–20 cm (4–8 in) long
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Eggplant
Solanum
Solanum
ovigerum Dunal Solanum
Solanum
trongum Poir. and see text Eggplant
Eggplant
( Solanum
Solanum
melongena) or aubergine is a species of nightshade grown for its edible fruit. Eggplant
Eggplant
is the common name in North America, Australia and New Zealand; in British English, it is aubergine,[1] and in South Asia
South Asia
and South Africa, brinjal.[2] The fruit is widely used in cooking. As a member of the genus Solanum, it is related to the tomato and the potato. It was originally domesticated from the wild nightshade species, the thorn or bitter apple, S
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Mastic (plant Resin)
Mastic (Greek: Μαστίχα) is a resin obtained from the mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus). In pharmacies and nature shops, it is called "Arabic gum" (not to be confused with gum arabic) and "Yemen gum". In Greece, it is known as the "tears of Chios," being traditionally produced on that Greek island, and, like other natural resins, is produced in "tears" or droplets. Originally a sap, mastic is sun-dried into pieces of brittle, translucent resin. When chewed, the resin softens and becomes a bright white and opaque gum
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Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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Olive
The olive, known by the botanical name Olea
Olea
europaea, meaning "European olive", is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, found in the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
from Portugal
Portugal
to the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, and southern Asia
Asia
as far east as China, as well as the Canary Islands
Canary Islands
and Réunion
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Oregano
Oregano
Oregano
(US: /ɔːˈrɛɡənoʊ/ or /əˈrɛɡənoʊ/;[1] UK: /ˌɒrɪˈɡɑːnoʊ/;[2] Origanum
Origanum
vulgare) is a flowering plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae). It is native to temperate Western and Southwestern Eurasia
Eurasia
and the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
region. Oregano
Oregano
is a perennial herb, growing from 20–80 cm (7.9–31.5 in) tall, with opposite leaves 1–4 cm (0.39–1.57 in) long. The flowers are purple, 3–4 mm (0.12–0.16 in) long, produced in erect spikes. It is sometimes called wild marjoram, and its close relative, O
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