HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Larsen Syndrome
Larsen syndrome
Larsen syndrome
(LS) is a congenital disorder discovered in 1950 by Larsen and associates when they observed dislocation of the large joints and face anomalies in six of their patients.[1] Patients with Larsen syndrome
[...More...]

"Larsen Syndrome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Congenital Disorder
A birth defect, also known as a congenital disorder, is a condition present at birth regardless of its cause.[3] Birth
Birth
defects may result in disabilities that may be physical, intellectual, or developmental.[3] The disabilities can range from mild to severe.[7] Birth
Birth
defects are divided into two main types: structural disorders in which there are problems with t
[...More...]

"Congenital Disorder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phenotype
A phenotype (from Greek phainein, meaning 'to show', and typos, meaning 'type') is the composite of an organism's observable characteristics or traits, such as its morphology, development, biochemical or physiological properties, behavior, and products of behavior (such as a bird's nest). A phenotype results from the expression of an organism's genetic code, its genotype, as well as the influence of environmental factors and the interactions between the two. When two or more clearly different phenotypes exist in the same population of a species, the species is called polymorphic
[...More...]

"Phenotype" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Malocclusion
A malocclusion is a misalignment or incorrect relation between the teeth of the two dental arches when they approach each other as the jaws close. The term was coined by Edward Angle, the "father of modern orthodontics",[1] as a derivative of occlusion. This refers to the manner in which opposing teeth meet (mal- + occlusion = "incorrect occlusion").Contents1 Signs and symptoms 2 Classification2.1 Angle's classification method 2.2 Review of Angle's system of classes and alternative systems3 Crowding of teeth3.1 Causes 3.2 Treatment4 Tooth size discrepancy 5 Other conditions 6 Cause 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSigns and symptoms[edit] Malocclusion is a common finding,[2][3] although it is not usually serious enough to require treatment. Those who have more severe malocclusions, which present as a part of Craniofacial Anomalies, may require orthodontic and sometimes surgical treatment (orthognathic surgery) to correct the problem
[...More...]

"Malocclusion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Microdontia
Microdontia
Microdontia
is a condition in which one or more teeth appear smaller than normal. In the generalized form, all teeth are involved. In the localized form, only a few teeth are involved
[...More...]

"Microdontia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hypodontia
Hypodontia is an inherited condition characterized by developmentally missing teeth, without taking the absent third molars into account. In the case where there are six or more missing permanent teeth, the condition is called oligodontia. Anodontia refers to the condition where no teeth are present.[1] Supernumerary teeth refers to conditions where there are more teeth than the usual number. Missing third molars occur in 9–30% of studied populations
[...More...]

"Hypodontia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Agenesis
In medicine, agenesis (/eɪˈdʒɛnəsəs/[1]) refers to the failure of an organ to develop during embryonic growth and development due to the absence of primordial tissue. Many forms of agenesis are referred to by individual names, depending on the organ affected: Agenesis of the corpus callosum
Agenesis of the corpus callosum
- failure of the Corpus callosum to develop Renal agenesis - failure of one or both of the kidneys to develop Phocomelia
Phocomelia
- failure of the arms or legs to develop Penile agenesis - failure of penis to develop Müllerian agenesis
Müllerian agenesis
- failure of the uterus and part of the vagina to develop Agenesis of the gallbladder - failure of the Gallbladder to develop
[...More...]

"Agenesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chondrocytes
Chondrocytes (from Greek χόνδρος, chondros = cartilage + κύτος, kytos = cell) are the only cells found in healthy cartilage. They produce and maintain the cartilaginous matrix, which consists mainly of collagen and proteoglycans
[...More...]

"Chondrocytes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morphogenesis
Morphogenesis
Morphogenesis
(from the Greek morphê shape and genesis creation, literally, "beginning of the shape") is the biological process that causes an organism to develop its shape. It is one of three fundamental aspects of developmental biology along with the control of cell growth and cellular differentiation, unified in evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). The process controls the organized spatial distribution of cells during the embryonic development of an organism. Morphogenesis
Morphogenesis
can take place also in a mature organism, in cell culture or inside tumor cell masses
[...More...]

"Morphogenesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Missense Mutations
In genetics, a missense mutation is a point mutation in which a single nucleotide change results in a codon that codes for a different amino acid.[1] It is a type of nonsynonymous substitution.Contents1 Substitution of protein from DNA mutations 2 Example 3 Experimental analysis 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksSubstitution of protein from DNA mutations[edit]This image shows an example of missense mutation. One of the nucleotides (adenine) is replaced by another nucleotide (cytosine) in the DNA sequence. This results in an incorrect amino acid (proline) being incorporated into the protein sequence.Missense mutation or substitution refers to a change in one amino acid in a protein, arising from a point mutation in a single nucleotide. Missense mutation is a type of nonsynonymous substitution in a DNA sequence
[...More...]

"Missense Mutations" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Apoptosis
Apoptosis
Apoptosis
(from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἀπόπτωσις "falling off") is a process of programmed cell death that occurs in multicellular organisms.[2] Biochemical events lead to characteristic cell changes (morphology) and death. These changes include blebbing, cell shrinkage, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, chromosomal DNA
DNA
fragmentation, and global[vague] mRNA decay. Between 50 and 70 billion cells die each day due to apoptosis in the average human adult.[a] For an average child between the ages of 8 and 14, approximately 20 to 30 billion cells die a day.[4] In contrast to necrosis, which is a form of traumatic cell death that results from acute cellular injury, apoptosis is a highly regulated and controlled process that confers advantages during an organism's lifecycle
[...More...]

"Apoptosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Epiphyseal Growth Plates
The epiphyseal plate (or epiphysial plate, physis, or growth plate) is a hyaline cartilage plate in the metaphysis at each end of a long bone. It is the part of a long bone where new bone growth takes place; that is, the whole bone is alive, with maintenance remodeling throughout its existing bone tissue, but the growth plate is the place where the long bone grows longer (adds length). The plate is found in children and adolescents; in adults, who have stopped growing, the plate is replaced by an epiphyseal line. This replacement is known as epiphyseal closure.Contents1 Structure1.1 Development 1.2 Histology2 Clinical significance 3 Other animals 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksStructure[edit] Development[edit] Endochondral ossification is responsible for the initial bone development from cartilage in utero and infants and the longitudinal growth of long bones in the epiphyseal plate. The plate's chondrocytes are under constant division by mitosis
[...More...]

"Epiphyseal Growth Plates" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pulmonary Hypoplasia
Pulmonary hypoplasia is incomplete development of the lungs, resulting in an abnormally low number or size of bronchopulmonary segments or alveoli. A congenital malformation, it most often occurs secondary to other fetal abnormalities that interfere with normal development of the lungs
[...More...]

"Pulmonary Hypoplasia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cataracts
A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye which leads to a decrease in vision.[1] Cataracts often develop slowly and can affect one or both eyes.[1] Symptoms may include faded colors, blurry vision, halos around light, trouble with bright lights, and trouble seeing at night.[1] This may result in trouble driving, reading, or recognizing faces.[6] Poor vision caused by cataracts may also result in an increased risk of falling and depression.[2] Cataracts are the cause of half of blindness and 33% of visual impairment worldwide.[3][7] Cataracts are most commonly due to aging but may also occur due to trauma or radiation exposure, be present from birth, or occur following eye surgery for other problems.[1][4] Risk factors include diabetes, smoking tobacco, prolonged exposure to sunlight, and alcohol.[1] Either clumps of protein or yellow-brown pigment may be deposited in the lens reducing the transmission of light to the retina at the back of the eye.[1] Diagnosis is by an eye exami
[...More...]

"Cataracts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ultrasound
Ultrasound
Ultrasound
is sound waves with frequencies higher than the upper audible limit of human hearing. Ultrasound
Ultrasound
is no different from 'normal' (audible) sound in its physical properties, except in that humans cannot hear it. This limit varies from person to person and is approximately 20 kilohertz (20,000 hertz) in healthy, young adults. Ultrasound
Ultrasound
devices operate with frequencies from 20 kHz up to several gigahertz. Ultrasound
Ultrasound
is used in many different fields. Ultrasonic devices are used to detect objects and measure distances. Ultrasound imaging
Ultrasound imaging
or sonography is often used in medicine. In the nondestructive testing of products and structures, ultrasound is used to detect invisible flaws. Industrially, ultrasound is used for cleaning, mixing, and to accelerate chemical processes
[...More...]

"Ultrasound" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prenatal
Prenatal development
Prenatal development
is the process in which an embryo and later fetus develops during gestation. Prenatal development
Prenatal development
starts with fertilization the first stage in embryogenesis which continues in fetal development until birth. In human pregnancy, prenatal development, also known as antenatal development, is the development of the embryo following fertilization, and continued as fetal development. By the end of the tenth week of gestational age the embryo has acquired its basic form and is referred to as a fetus. The next period is that of fetal development where many organs become fully developed. This fetal period is described both topically (by organ) and chronologically (by time) with major occurrences being listed by gestational age. In other animals the very early stages of embryogenesis are the same as those in humans
[...More...]

"Prenatal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.