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Larry McMurtry
Larry Jeff McMurtry (born June 3, 1936) is an American novelist, essayist, bookseller, and screenwriter whose work is predominantly set in either the Old West or in contemporary Texas.[1] His novels include Horseman, Pass By
Horseman, Pass By
(1962), The Last Picture Show
The Last Picture Show
(1966) and Terms of Endearment (1975), which were adapted into films earning 26 Academy Award nominations (10 wins). His 1985 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Lonesome Dove
Lonesome Dove
was adapted into a television miniseries that earned 18 Emmy Award
Emmy Award
nominations (seven wins), with the other three novels in his Lonesome Dove
Lonesome Dove
series adapted into three more miniseries, earning eight more Emmy nominations
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Cowboy Boots
Cowboy
Cowboy
boots refer to a specific style of riding boot, historically worn by cowboys. They have a Cuban heel, rounded to pointed toe, high shaft, and, traditionally, no lacing. Cowboy
Cowboy
boots are normally made from cowhide leather but are also sometimes made from "exotic" skins such as alligator, snake, ostrich, lizard, eel, elephant, stingray, elk, buffalo, and the like. There are two basic styles of cowboy boots, western (or classic), and roper. The classic style is distinguished by a tall boot shaft, going to at least mid-calf, with an angled "cowboy" heel, usually over one inch high. A slightly lower, still angled, "walking" heel is also common. The toe of western boots was originally rounded or squared in shape
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Washington, DC
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Texas Christian University
Texas
Texas
Christian University
University
(TCU) is a private Christian-based, coeducational university in Fort Worth, Texas, established in 1873 by brothers Addison and Randolph Clark as the AddRan Male & Female College. The campus is located on 272 acres (1.10 km2) about three miles (5 km) from downtown Fort Worth. TCU is affiliated with, but not governed by, the Disciples of Christ. The university consists of 8 constituent colleges and schools and has a classical liberal arts curriculum. It is ranked in the 'Top 100 National Universities' by the US News and World Report [6] and is categorized as a Doctoral University: Higher Research Activity (R2) in the Carnegie Classifications by the Indiana University
University
Center for Postsecondary Research.[7] Its mascot is the horned frog, the state reptile of Texas
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Tom Wolfe
Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr. (born March 2, 1931)[1] is an American author and journalist, best known for his association with and influence in stimulating the New Journalism
New Journalism
literary movement, in which literary techniques are used extensively. He reduced traditional values of journalistic objectivity. He began his career as a regional newspaper reporter in the 1950s, but achieved national prominence in the 1960s following the publication of such best-selling books as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
(a highly experimental account of Ken Kesey
Ken Kesey
and the Merry Pranksters), and two collections of articles and essays, Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. His first novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, published in 1987, was met with critical acclaim, and also became a commercial success
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The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
The Electric Kool-Aid
Kool-Aid
Acid Test is a nonfiction book by Tom Wolfe
Tom Wolfe
that was published in 1968. The book is remembered today as an early – and arguably the most popular – example of the growing literary style called New Journalism. Wolfe presents an as-if-firsthand account of the experiences of Ken Kesey
Ken Kesey
and his band of Merry Pranksters, who traveled across the country in a colorfully painted school bus named Further.[1] Kesey and the Pranksters became famous for their use of LSD
LSD
and other psychedelic drugs in hopes of achieving intersubjectivity
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Guggenheim Fellowship
Guggenheim Fellowships are grants that have been awarded annually since 1925 by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those "who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts". The roll of Fellows includes numerous Nobel Laureates, Pulitzer and other prize winners. Each year, the foundation makes several hundred awards in each of two separate competitions:one open to citizens and permanent residents of the United States and Canada. the other to citizens and permanent residents of Latin America and the Caribbean.The performing arts are excluded, although composers, film directors, and choreographers are eligible. The fellowships are not open to students, only to "advanced professionals in mid-career" such as published authors
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PEN American Center
PEN American Center
PEN American Center
(PEN), founded in 1922 and based in New York City, works to advance literature, defend free expression, and foster international literary fellowship. As of 2016, the name was shortened to PEN America. PEN America has a membership of more than 4,400 writers, editors, and translators. PEN America is the largest of the 149 centers in 101 countries that belong to PEN International, the worldwide association of writers that defends those who are harassed, imprisoned and killed for their views.[1] PEN America is one of two PEN centers located in the USA
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Houston
Houston
Houston
(/ˈhjuːstən/ ( listen) HYOO-stən) is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas
Texas
and the fourth-most populous city in the United States, with a census-estimated 2016 population of 2.303 million[2] within a land area of 599.59 square miles (1,552.9 km2).[7] It is the largest city in the Southern United States,[8] and the seat of Harris County. Located in Southeast Texas
Texas
near the Gulf of Mexico, it is the principal city of the Greater Houston
Houston
metro area, which is the fifth-most populated MSA in the United States. Houston
Houston
was founded on August 30, 1836, near the banks of Buffalo Bayou (now known as Allen's Landing)[9][10] and incorporated as a city on June 5, 1837
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Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)
Georgetown is a historic neighborhood and a commercial and entertainment district located in northwest Washington, D.C., situated along the Potomac River. Founded in 1751 in the Province of Maryland, the port of Georgetown predated the establishment of the federal district and the City of Washington by 40 years. Georgetown remained a separate municipality until 1871, when the United States Congress created a new consolidated government for the whole District of Columbia
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Stanford University
Stanford University
University
(officially Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Junior University,[11] colloquially the Farm) is a private research university in Stanford, California. Because of its academic strength, wealth, and proximity to Silicon Valley, Stanford is often cited as one of the world's most prestigious universities.[12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19] The university was founded in 1885 by Leland and Jane Stanford
Jane Stanford
in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Stanford was a former Governor of California
California
and U.S. Senator; he made his fortune as a railroad tycoon
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Macon, Georgia
Macon /ˈmeɪkən/ (officially Macon–Bibb County) is a city located in the state of Georgia, United States. Macon lies near the geographic center of the state, approximately 85 miles (137 km) south of Atlanta, hence the city's nickname "The Heart of Georgia." Located near the fall line of the Ocmulgee River, Macon is the county seat of Bibb County and had a 2014 estimated population of 153,691. Macon is the principal city of the Macon metropolitan area, which had an estimated population of 231,259 in 2014
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Paul Newman
Kenyon College
Kenyon College
(B.A., 1949) Yale School of DramaOccupation Actor, voice actor, film director, producer, race car driver, IndyCar owner, entrepreneur, activistYears active 1951–2008Spouse(s) Jackie Witte (m. 1949; div. 1958) Joanne Woodward (m. 1958)Children 6; including Scott, Nell, and Melissa NewmanPaul Leonard Newman (January 26, 1925 – September 26, 2008) was an American actor, voice actor, film director, producer, race car driver, IndyCar owner, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and activist. He won and was nominated for numerous awards, winning an Academy Award
Academy Award
for his performance in the 1986 film The Color of Money,[1] a BAFTA Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award, a Cannes Film Festival
Cannes Film Festival
Award, an Emmy Award, and many others
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Patricia Neal
Patsy Louise "Patricia" Neal (January 20, 1926 – August 8, 2010) was an American actress of stage and screen. She was best known for her film roles as World War II widow Helen Benson in The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), wealthy matron Emily Eustace Failenson in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), and the worn-out housekeeper Alma Brown in Hud (1963), for which she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She featured as the matriarch in the television film The Homecoming: A Christmas Story (1971); her role as Olivia Walton was recast for the series it inspired, The Waltons.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Legacy 5 Death 6 Filmography6.1 Film 6.2 Television 6.3 Stage7 Bibliography 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Patsy Louise Neal was born in Packard, Whitley County, Kentucky, to William Burdette Neal (1895–1944) and Eura Mildred (née Petrey) Neal (1899–2003)
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Robert Duvall
Robert Selden Duvall[4] (/duːˈvɔːl/; born January 5, 1931)[5] is an American actor and filmmaker. He has been nominated for seven Academy Awards (winning for his performance in Tender Mercies), seven Golden Globes (winning four), and has multiple nominations and one win each of the BAFTA, Screen Actors Guild
Screen Actors Guild
Award, and Emmy Award. He received the National Medal of Arts
National Medal of Arts
in 2005
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Golden Globe
Golden Globe Awards are accolades bestowed by the 93 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association
Hollywood Foreign Press Association
beginning in January 1944, recognizing excellence in film and television, both domestic and foreign. The annual ceremony at which the awards are presented is a major part of the film industry's awards season, which culminates each year in the Academy Awards.[1] The eligibility period for the Golden Globes corresponds to the calendar year (i.e. January 1 through December 31). The most recent ceremony, the 75th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television in 2017, was held on January 7, 2018
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