HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Larry McCaffery
Lawrence F. "Larry" McCaffery Jr. (born May 13, 1946) is an America literary critic, editor, and retired professor of English and Comparative Literature
Comparative Literature
at San Diego State University. His work and teaching focuses on postmodern literature, contemporary fiction, and Bruce Springsteen.[1] He also played a role in helping to establish science fiction as a major literary genre.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Literary career 3 Awards and honors 4 References in pop culture and legacy 5 Selected bibliography5.1 Books of interviews 5.2 Scholarly books 5.3 Fiction
Fiction
anthologies6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] McCaffery was born in 1946 in Dallas, Texas. He received his PhD in 1975, with a dissertation on the works of Robert Coover.[3] He joined the Department of English and Comparative Literature
Comparative Literature
at San Diego State University in 1976
[...More...]

"Larry McCaffery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Literary Critic
Literary criticism
Literary criticism
(or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of literature's goals and methods. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely from book reviewing, is a matter of some controversy. For example, the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism[1] draws no distinction between literary theory and literary criticism, and almost always uses the terms together to describe the same concept
[...More...]

"Literary Critic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jean Baudrillard
Jean Baudrillard
Jean Baudrillard
(/ˌboʊdriːˈɑːr/; French: [ʒɑ̃ bodʁijaʁ]; 27 July 1929 – 6 March 2007) was a French sociologist, philosopher, cultural theorist, political commentator, and photographer. He is best known for his analyses of media, contemporary culture, and technological communication, as well as his formulation of concepts such as simulation and hyperreality. He wrote about diverse subjects, including consumerism, gender relations, economics, social history, art, Western foreign policy, and popular culture. Among his best known works are Simulacra and Simulation
Simulation
(1981), America (1986), and The Gulf War Did Not Take Place
The Gulf War Did Not Take Place
(1991)
[...More...]

"Jean Baudrillard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
[...More...]

"New York City" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Editing
Editing
Editing
is the process of selecting and preparing written, visual, audible, and film media used to convey information. The editing process can involve correction, condensation, organization, and many other modifications performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate and complete work.[1] The editing process often begins with the author's idea for the work itself, continuing as a collaboration between the author and the editor as the work is created. As such, editing can involve creative skills, human relations and a precise set of methods.[2][3]Editors work on producing an issue of Bild, West Berlin, 1977. Previous front pages are affixed to the wall behind them.There are various editorial positions in publishing. Typically, one finds editorial assistants reporting to the senior-level editorial staff and directors who report to senior executive editors
[...More...]

"Editing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Postmodern
Postmodernism
Postmodernism
is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late-20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.[1][2][3] The term has also more generally been applied to the historical era following modernity, and the tendencies of this era.[4] While encompassing a disparate variety of approaches, postmodernism is typically defined by an attitude of skepticism, irony, or rejection toward the meta-narratives and ideologies of modernism, and often calls into question various assumptions of Enlightenment rationality.[5] Common targets of post
[...More...]

"Postmodern" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Samuel R. Delany
Samuel Ray Delany Jr. (/dəˈleɪni/; born April 1, 1942), Chip Delany to his friends,[2] is an African American author, professor and literary critic. His work includes fiction (especially science fiction), memoir, criticism and essays on sexuality and society. His science fiction novels include Babel-17, The Einstein Intersection (winners of the Nebula Award
Nebula Award
for 1966[3] and 1967[4] respectively), Nova, Dhalgren, and the Return to Nevèrÿon
Return to Nevèrÿon
series. After winning four Nebula awards and two Hugo awards[5] over the course of his career, Delany was inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy
Fantasy
Hall of Fame in 2002.[6] From January 2001 until his retirement in May 2015,[7][8] he was a professor of English and Creative Writing at Temple University
Temple University
in Philadelphia. In 2010 he won the third J
[...More...]

"Samuel R. Delany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Don DeLillo
Donald Richard "Don" DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American novelist, playwright and essayist. His works have covered subjects as diverse as television, nuclear war, sports, the complexities of language, performance art, the Cold War, mathematics, the advent of the digital age, politics, economics, and global terrorism. Initially he was a well-regarded cult writer; however, the publication in 1985 of White Noise brought him widespread recognition, and won him the National Book Award for fiction. It was followed in 1988 by Libra, a bestseller
[...More...]

"Don DeLillo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kathy Acker
Kathy Acker
Kathy Acker
(April 18, 1947[2] – November 30, 1997) was an American experimental novelist, punk poet, playwright, essayist, postmodernist and sex-positive feminist writer. She was influenced by the Black Mountain School poets, the writer William S. Burroughs, the artist and theoretician David Antin, French critical theory, feminist artists Carolee Schneeman
Carolee Schneeman
and Eleanor Antin, and by philosophy, mysticism, and pornography.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Health and death 3 Education 4 Literary
Literary
overview 5 Posthumous reputation 6 Published works 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBiography[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Kathy Acker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Harold Jaffe
Harold Jaffe (born July 8, 1942[2]) is an American writer of novels, short fiction, drama and essays. He is the author of 26 books, including 14 collections of fiction, four novels and two volumes of essays. He is also the editor of the literary-cultural journal Fiction International. His works have been translated into 15 languages, including German, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, French, Turkish, Dutch, Czech, and Serbo-Croatian. Jaffe is also a Professor of Creative Writing, English and Comparative Literature at San Diego State University.[3] Jaffe’s fiction has appeared in such journals as Mississippi Review; City Lights Review; Paris Review; New Directions in Prose and Poetry; Chicago Review; Chelsea; Fiction;Central Park; Witness; Black Ice; Minnesota Review;Boundary 2; ACM; Black Warrior Review; Cream City Review; Two Girls’Review; and New Novel Review
[...More...]

"Harold Jaffe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jacques Derrida
Jacques Derrida[2] (born Jackie Élie Derrida;[3] 1930–2004) was a French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction, which he discussed in numerous texts, and developed in the context of phenomenology.[4][5][6] He is one of the major figures associated with post-structuralism and postmodern philosophy.[7][8][9] During his career Derrida published more than 40 books, together with hundreds of essays and public presentations. He had a significant influence upon the humanities and social sciences, including—in addition to philosophy and literature—law,[10][11][12] anthropology,[13] historiography,[14] applied linguistics,[15] sociolinguistics,[16] psychoanalysis, political theory, religious studies, feminism, and gay and lesbian studies
[...More...]

"Jacques Derrida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Postmodernism
Postmodernism
Postmodernism
is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late-20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.[1][2][3] The term has also more generally been applied to the historical era following modernity, and the tendencies of this era.[4] While encompassing a disparate variety of approaches, postmodernism is typically defined by an attitude of skepticism, irony, or rejection toward the meta-narratives and ideologies of modernism, and often calls into question various assumptions of Enlightenment rationality.[5] Common targets of post
[...More...]

"Postmodernism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Readercon
Readercon is an annual science fiction convention, held every July in the Boston, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
area, in Burlington, Massachusetts. It was founded by Bob Colby and statistician Eric Van in the mid-1980s [1] with the goal of focusing almost exclusively on science fiction/fantasy/slipstream/speculative fiction in the written form (on the rare occasion that there is a discussion held about non-written science fiction, it will have a tongue-in-cheek title such as "Our biannual media panel").[2] Past guests of honor have included authors such as Greer Gilman, Gene Wolfe, Octavia Butler, Samuel R. Delany, Karen Joy Fowler, Brian Aldiss, Nalo Hopkinson, Joe Haldeman, Caitlín R. Kiernan, Peter Straub, and China Miéville, and editors such as Ellen Datlow
Ellen Datlow
and David G. Hartwell. The convention also makes a point of honoring a deceased author as the Memorial Guest of Honor
[...More...]

"Readercon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Endowment For The Humanities
The National Endowment for the Humanities
Humanities
(NEH) is an independent federal agency of the U.S. government, established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities
Humanities
Act of 1965 (Pub.L. 89–209), dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities
[...More...]

"National Endowment For The Humanities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pushcart Prize
The Pushcart Prize is an American literary prize published by Pushcart Press that honors the best "poetry, short fiction, essays or literary whatnot"[1] published in the small presses over the previous year. Magazine and small book press editors are invited to submit[2] up to six works they have featured. Anthologies of the selected works have been published annually since 1976
[...More...]

"Pushcart Prize" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Los Angeles Times Book Prize
Since 1980, the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
has awarded a set of annual book prizes. The Prizes "currently have nine single-title categories: biography, current interest, fiction, first fiction (the Art Seidenbaum Award added in 1991), history, mystery/thriller (category added in 2000), poetry, science and technology (category added in 1989), and young adult fiction (category added in 1998). In addition, the Robert Kirsch Award is presented annually to a living author with a substantial connection to the American West, whose contribution to American letters deserves special recognition.".[1] It is named in honor of Robert Kirsch, the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
book critic from 1952 until his death in 1980; he had the idea to establish the book prizes. The Book Prize program was founded by Art Seidenbaum, a Los Angeles Times book editor from 1978 to 1985. An award named for him was added a year after his death in 1990
[...More...]

"Los Angeles Times Book Prize" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.