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Larry Lujack
Larry Lujack
Larry Lujack
(June 6, 1940 – December 18, 2013), also called Superjock, Lawrence of Chicago, Uncle Lar, and King of the Corn Belt, was a Top 40 music radio disc jockey who was well known for his world-weary sarcastic style. Some of his more popular routines included Klunk Letter of the Day,[1] the darkly humorous Animal Stories[2][3] with sidekick Tommy Edwards as Little Tommy, and the Cheap Trashy Show Biz Report.Contents1 Professional life 2 Personal life 3 Radio
Radio
stations 4 Works 5 References 6 External linksProfessional life[edit] Lujack initially came to Chicago
Chicago
to work for WCFL-AM. He spent a few months there before being hired at WLS. While at WCFL, Lujack closed the air studio curtains during public visiting hours.[4] His Animal Stories routine came about because WLS was still receiving farm magazines long after the station changed to a rock-music format in 1960
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Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
(/ˌɪlɪˈnɔɪ/ ( listen) IL-ih-NOY) is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. It is the 6th most populous state and 25th largest state in terms of land area, and is often noted as a microcosm of the entire country.[7] With Chicago
Chicago
in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and northern Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois
Illinois
has a diverse economic base and is a major transportation hub. The Port of Chicago connects the state to other global ports from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean, as well as the Great Lakes to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River, via the Illinois Waterway
Illinois Waterway
on the Illinois
Illinois
River
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Spokane, Washington
Spokane
Spokane
(/ˌspoʊˈkæn/ ( listen) spoh-KAN)[7] is a city in the state of Washington in the northwestern United States. It is along the Spokane River
Spokane River
west of the Rocky Mountain
Rocky Mountain
foothills in eastern Washington, 92 miles (148 km) south of the Canada–US border, approximately 20 miles (30 km) from the Washington–Idaho border, and 280 miles (450 km) east of Seattle
Seattle
along Interstate 90. Known as the birthplace of Father's Day, Spokane's official nickname is the " Lilac
Lilac
City". It is the seat of Spokane County
Spokane County
and the economic and cultural center of the Spokane
Spokane
Metropolitan Area, the Greater Spokane
Spokane
Area, and the Inland Northwest
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Radio
Radio
Radio
is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width.[n 1] When radio waves strike an electrical conductor, the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form. Radio
Radio
systems need a transmitter to modulate (change) some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it, for example using amplitude modulation or angle modulation (which can be frequency modulation or phase modulation). Radio
Radio
systems also need an antenna to convert electric currents into radio waves, and radio waves into an electric current. An antenna can be used for both transmitting and receiving
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KCID
KCID (1490 AM) (now Salt & Light's local Spanish Catholic) is a radio station broadcasting a Spanish religious format. Licensed to Caldwell, Idaho, United States, the station serves the Boise area. The station is currently owned by Salt & Light Radio. Former owners Journal Broadcast Group
Journal Broadcast Group
announced July 22, 2009 [1] that KCID, along with sister station KGEM 1140AM, were to be sold to Salt & Light Radio for $950,000
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Radio Station
A radio station is a set of equipment necessary to carry on communication via radio waves. Generally, it is a receiver or transmitter, an antenna, and some smaller additional equipment necessary to operate them. Radio stations
Radio stations
play a vital role in communication technology as they are heavily relied on to transfer data and information across the world.[1] More broadly, the definition of a radio station includes the aforementioned equipment and a building in which it is installed. Such a station may include several "radio stations" defined above (i.e. several sets of receivers or transmitters installed in one building but functioning independently, and several antennas installed on a field next to the building). This definition of a radio station is more often referred to as a transmitter site, transmitter station, transmission facility or transmitting station
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Santa Fe, New Mexico
Santa Fe (/ˌsæntəˈfeɪ/ or /ˈsæntəˌfeɪ/; Tewa: Ogha Po'oge, Navajo: Yootó) is the capital of the state of New Mexico. It is the fourth-largest city in the state and the seat of Santa Fe County. This area was occupied for at least several thousand years by indigenous peoples who built villages several hundred years ago on the current site of the city. It was known by the Tewa inhabitants as Ogha Po'oge ("White Shell Water Place").[4] The city of Santa Fe, founded by Spanish colonists in 1610, is the oldest city in the state and the oldest state capital city in the United States. Santa Fe (meaning "holy faith" in Spanish) had a population of 69,204 in 2012. It is the principal city of a Metropolitan Statistical Area
Metropolitan Statistical Area
which encompasses all of Santa Fe County
Santa Fe County
and is part of the larger Albuquerque–Santa Fe–Las Vegas combined statistical area
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Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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AM Radio
AM broadcasting
AM broadcasting
is a radio broadcasting technology, which employs amplitude modulation (AM) transmissions. It was the first method developed for making audio radio transmissions, and is still used worldwide, primarily for medium wave (also known as "AM band") transmissions, but also on the longwave and shortwave radio bands. The earliest experimental AM transmissions were begun in the early 1900s. However, widespread AM broadcasting
AM broadcasting
was not established until the 1920s, following the development of vacuum tube receivers and transmitters
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Golf
Golf
Golf
is a club-and-ball sport in which players use various clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course in as few strokes as possible. Golf, unlike most ball games, cannot and does not utilize a standardized playing area, and coping with the varied terrains encountered on different courses is a key part of the game. The game at the highest level is played on a course with an arranged progression of 18 holes, though recreational courses can be smaller, usually 9 holes. Each hole on the course must contain a tee box to start from, and a putting green containing the actual hole or cup (4.25 inches in diameter)
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Washington (state)
Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/ ( listen)), officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of the United States. Named after George Washington, the first president of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty
Oregon Treaty
in the settlement of the Oregon
Oregon
boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, which is often shortened to Washington. Washington is the 18th largest state with an area of 71,362 square miles (184,827 km2), and the 13th most populous state with over 7.4 million people
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Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery
Coronary artery
Coronary artery
bypass surgery, also known as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG, pronounced "cabbage") surgery, and colloquially heart bypass or bypass surgery, is a surgical procedure to restore normal blood flow to an obstructed coronary artery. A normal coronary artery transports blood to and from the heart muscle itself, not through the main circulatory system. There are two main approaches. In one, the left internal thoracic artery (internal mammary artery) is diverted to the left anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery
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Winter Clothing
Winter
Winter
clothing are clothes used for protection against the particularly cold weather of winter.[1] Often they have a good water resistant, consist of multiple layers to protect and insulate against low temperatures.[2] Winter
Winter
clothes are especially outerwear like coats, jackets, hats, scarfs and gloves or mittens, but also warm underwear like long underwear, union suits and socks.[3] Military issue winter clothing evolved from heavy coats and jackets to multilayered clothing for the purpose of keeping troops warm during winter battles.[4] Several shirts and socks, usually four pairs were standard issue for the U.S. Army during WWII. Winter
Winter
clothes used for sports and recreation includes ski suits and snowmobile suits
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Snowshoe
A snowshoe is footwear for walking over snow. Snowshoes work by distributing the weight of the person over a larger area so that the person's foot does not sink completely into the snow, a quality called "flotation". Snowshoeing is a form of hiking. Traditional snowshoes have a hardwood frame with rawhide lacings. Some modern snowshoes are similar, but most are made of materials such as lightweight metal, plastic, and synthetic fabric. In addition to distributing the weight, snowshoes are generally raised at the toe for maneuverability
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Buffalo Grove, Illinois
Buffalo Grove is a village in Lake and Cook counties in the U.S. state of Illinois, within the northwest suburbs of Chicago. As of the 2010 census, the village population was 41,496.[4] Most of the village is located within the 10th Congressional District of Illinois, although the southern portion is represented in the 8th Congressional District.[citation needed]Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Libraries 4 Attractions 5 Transportation 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External linksGeography[edit] Buffalo Grove is located at 42°9′59″N 87°57′48″W / 42.16639°N 87.96333°W / 42.16639; -87.96333 (42.166332, −87.963391),[5] among the northwest suburbs of Chicago. Illinois Route 83 leads north towards central Lake County and south towards O'Hare International Airport
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Esophageal Cancer
Esophageal cancer
Esophageal cancer
is cancer arising from the esophagus—the food pipe that runs between the throat and the stomach.[2] Symptoms often include difficulty in swallowing and weight loss.[1] Other symptoms may include pain when swallowing, a hoarse voice, enlarged lymph nodes ("glands") around the collarbone, a dry cough, and possibly coughing up or vomiting blood.[1] The two main sub-types of the disease are esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (often abbreviated t
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