HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Larbert
Larbert
Larbert
(Scottish Gaelic: Lèirbert/Leth-pheairt, Scots: Lairbert)[1] is a small town in the Falkirk
Falkirk
council area of Scotland. The town lies in the Forth Valley above the River Carron which flows from the west. Larbert
Larbert
is 3 miles (4.8 km) from the shoreline of the Firth of Forth and 2.5 miles (4.0 km) northwest of Falkirk, the main town in the area
[...More...]

"Larbert" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Scottish Gaelic Language
Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic (Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlikʲ] ( listen)) or the Gaelic, is a Celtic language native to the Gaels
Gaels
of Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic-speaking, as evidenced especially by Gaelic-language placenames.[3] In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001
[...More...]

"Scottish Gaelic Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Boiler
A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated. The fluid does not necessarily boil
[...More...]

"Boiler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Scottish Parliament
Government (62)[1]     Scottish National Party
Scottish National Party
(62)Opposition (66)[1]     Conservative (31)      Labour (22)      Green (6)      Liberal Democrats (5)      Independents (2)Presiding Officer (1)     PO (1)Committees16Audit Equal Opportunities Europe and External Relations Finance Procedures Public Petitions Standards and Public Ap
[...More...]

"Scottish Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
[...More...]

"List Of United Kingdom Locations" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of Places In Scotland
This List of places in Scotland
Scotland
is a complete collection of lists of places in Scotland.List of burghs in Scotland List of census localities in Scotland List of islands of ScotlandList of Shetland islands List of Orkney islands List of Inner Hebrides List of Outer Hebrides List of outlying islands of Scotland List of freshwater islands in ScotlandList of rivers of Scotland List of lochs in Scotland Waterfalls of Scotland List of Munros Extreme points of ScotlandLists of places within Scottish local authorities[edit]List of places in Aberdeen Li
[...More...]

"List Of Places In Scotland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

River Carron (Forth)
Carron may refer to :RiversRiver Carron, Forth, a river in Central Scotland River Carron, Wester Ross River Carron, Sutherland Carron River (Queensland), a river in Australia Carron Water, Aberdeenshire, a river that flows into the North Sea in Stonehaven Carron Water, Dumfriesshire, a river that flows into the Rive
[...More...]

"River Carron (Forth)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Firth Of Forth
The Firth
Firth
of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary (firth) of several Scottish rivers including the River Forth. It meets the North Sea
North Sea
with Fife
Fife
on the north coast and Lothian
Lothian
on the south.[1] It was known as Bodotria in Roman times. In the Norse sagas it was known as the Myrkvifiörd.[2]Contents1 Geography and economy 2 Islands 3 Settlements on the shoreline 4 Places of interest 5 References 6 External linksGeography and economy[edit] Geologically, the Firth
Firth
of Forth is a fjord, formed by the Forth Glacier
Glacier
in the last glacial period
[...More...]

"Firth Of Forth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Contiguous
A contiguity is a series of things in contact or in proximity, or the state of being such a mass or series.[1]Contents1 Biology 2 Computer science 3 Geography 4 Interaction design 5 Mathematics 6 Philosophy 7 Physics 8 Probability theory 9 Psychology 10 See also 11 ReferencesBiology[edit] A cluster of genes which are close to one another at a chromosome locus are called contiguous. Contiguous gene disorders result from deletions or duplications of a chromosome segment that cause a contiguous gene imbalance. Also, contiguity refers to the way taxonomy is ordered and formed after Charles Darwin wrote Theory of the Origins of Species in 1859. Before then, scientists used a more strict taxonomy based upon an organism's locomotion and mobility
[...More...]

"Contiguous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Heavy Industry
Heavy industry
Heavy industry
is industry that involves one or more characteristics such as large and heavy products; large and heavy equipment and facilities (such as heavy equipment, large machine tools, and huge buildings); or complex or numerous processes. Because of those factors, heavy industry involves higher capital intensity than light industry does, and it is also often more heavily cyclical in investment and employment. Transportation and construction along with their upstream manufacturing supply businesses have been the bulk of heavy industry throughout the industrial age, along with some capital-intensive manufacturing. Traditional examples from the mid-19th century through the early 20th included steelmaking, artillery production, locomotive erection, machine tool building, and the heavier types of mining
[...More...]

"Heavy Industry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Casting
Casting
Casting
is a manufacturing process in which a liquid material is usually poured into a mold, which contains a hollow cavity of the desired shape, and then allowed to solidify. The solidified part is also known as a casting, which is ejected or broken out of the mold to complete the process. Casting
Casting
materials are usually metals or various cold setting materials that cure after mixing two or more components together; examples are epoxy, concrete, plaster and clay. Casting
Casting
is most often used for making complex shapes that would be otherwise difficult or uneconomical to make by other methods.[1] Casting
Casting
is a 6000-year-old process
[...More...]

"Casting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Scotland (European Parliament Constituency)
Scotland
Scotland
constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. In 2014 it elected six MEPs, using the d'Hondt method of party-list proportional representation.Contents1 Boundaries 2 History 3 Returned members 4 Election results4.1 2014 4.2 2009 4.3 2004 4.4 19995 See also 6 References 7 External linksBoundaries[edit] The constituency's boundaries are the same as those of Scotland, one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. History[edit] The constituency was formed as a result of the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999, replacing a number of single-member constituencies
[...More...]

"Scotland (European Parliament Constituency)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era
Victorian era
was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
era of continental Europe. Defined according to sensibilities and political concerns, the period is sometimes considered to begin with the passage of the Reform Act 1832
[...More...]

"Victorian Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Care Of Residents
Residential care refers to long-term care given to adults or children who stay in a residential setting rather than in their own home or family home. There are various residential care options available, depending on the needs of the individual. People with disabilities, mental health problems, learning difficulties, Alzheimers, dementia or who are frail aged are often cared for at home by paid or voluntary caregivers, such as family and friends, with additional support from home care agencies
[...More...]

"Care Of Residents" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Commuter Town
A commuter town is a town whose residents normally work elsewhere but in which they live, eat and sleep. The name also suggests that these communities have little commercial or industrial activity beyond a small amount of locally-oriented retail business. A commuter town may also be known as an "exurb" (short for "extra-urban"), "bedroom community" (Canada and northeastern U.S. usage), "bedroom town", "bedroom suburb" (U.S. usage), "dormitory town", "dormitory suburb" or less commonly a "dormitory village" (British English/Commonwealth/Ireland).[citation needed] In Japan, it may also be referred to with the wasei-eigo coinage "bed town" (ベッドタウン, beddotaun).[1]Contents1 Distinction between suburbs and commuter towns 2 Causes 3 Effects 4 Exurbs4.1 Then and now 4.2 Planning5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDistinction between suburbs and commuter towns[edit]This section does not cite any sources
[...More...]

"Commuter Town" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.