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Laogai Research Foundation
The Laogai
Laogai
Research Foundation is a human rights NGO located in Washington, D.C, United States. The foundation's mission is to "gather information on and raise public awareness of the Laogai—China's extensive system of forced-labor prison camps."[1] History[edit] The Laogai
Laogai
Research Foundation was founded in 1992 by Harry Wu, a former political prisoner in the People's Republic of China. Born in 1937 to a prosperous Shanghai family, Wu fell afoul of the Chinese Communist Party while in college and was deemed a counter-revolutionary rightist during the Anti-Rightist Movement.[2] Wu was arrested in 1960 and sent to the Laogai, and he was eventually released some 19 years later. He emigrated to the United States in 1982 and began to publicize the systematic human rights abuses inflicted upon the Chinese people by the CCP
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Anti-Rightist Movement
The Anti-Rightist Campaign
Anti-Rightist Campaign
(simplified Chinese: 反右运动; traditional Chinese: 反右運動; pinyin: Fǎn Yòu Yùndòng) in the People's Republic of China, which lasted from roughly 1957 to 1959, was a campaign to purge alleged "rightists" within the Communist Party of China (CPC) and abroad. The definition of rightists was not always consistent, sometimes including critics to the left of the government, but officially referred to those intellectuals who appeared to favor capitalism and were against collectivization
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The Huffington Post
HuffPost
HuffPost
(formerly The Huffington Post and sometimes abbreviated HuffPo)[2] is a liberal[3] American news and opinion website and blog that has both localized and international editions
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Dalai Lama
Dalai Lama
Lama
/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/ (US); /ˌdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/ (UK)[1][2] (Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la'i bla ma [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given to spiritual leaders of the Tibetan people
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Tibet
Coordinates: 31°12′N 88°48′E / 31.2°N 88.8°E / 31.2; 88.8              "Greater Tibet" as claimed by Tibetan exile groups Tibetan autonomous areas, as designated by China  Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region, within ChinaChinese-controlled, claimed by
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Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Uygur Autonomous Region[6] (Uyghur: شىنجاڭ ئۇيغۇر ئاپتونوم رايونى‎; SASM/GNC: Xinjang Uyĝur Aptonom Rayoni; Chinese: 新疆维吾尔自治区; pinyin: Xīnjiāng Wéiwú’ěr Zìzhìqū) is a provincial-level autonomous region of China
China
in the northwest of the country. It is the largest Chinese administrative division and the eighth largest country subdivision in the world, spanning over 1.6 million km2 (640,000 square miles).[1] Xinjiang
Xinjiang
contains the disputed territory of Aksai Chin, which is administered by China. Xinjiang
Xinjiang
borders the countries of Mongolia, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan
Pakistan
and India
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Falun Gong
Falun Gong
Falun Gong
(UK: /ˌfɑːlʊn ˈɡɒŋ, ˌfæl-, - ˈɡʊŋ/, US: /ˌfɑːlʊn ˈɡɔːŋ, ˌfæl-/)[1] or Falun Dafa /- ˈdɑːfə/ (Standard Mandarin Chinese: [fàlwə̌n tâfà]; literally, "Dharma Wheel Practice" or "Law Wheel Practice") is a modern Chinese spiritual practice that combines meditation and qigong exercises with a moral philosophy centered on the tenets of truthfulness, compassion, and forbearance (Chinese: 真、善、忍). The practice emphasizes morality and the cultivation of virtue, and identifies as a qigong practice of the Buddhist school, though its teachings also incorporate elements drawn from Taoist
Taoist
traditions
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Charter 08
Charter 08
Charter 08
is a manifesto initially signed by 303 Chinese intellectuals and human rights activists.[1] It was published on 10 December 2008, the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopting name and style from the anti-Soviet Charter 77 issued by dissidents in Czechoslovakia.[2] Since its release, more than 10,000 people inside and outside China have signed the charter.[3][4][5] In 2009, one of the authors of Charter '08, Liu Xiaobo, was sentenced to eleven years' imprisonment for "inciting subversion of state power" because of his involvement. A year later, Liu was awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize
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Organ Harvesting
Organ procurement (previously called organ harvesting) is a surgical procedure that removes organs or tissues for reuse, typically for organ transplantation.[1] It is heavily regulated by United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to prevent unethical allocation of organs.[2] There are over 110,000 patients on the national waiting list for organ transplantation and in 2016, only about 33,000 organ transplants were performed.[3] Due to the lack of organ availability, about 20 patients die each day on the waiting list for organs.[3] Organ transplantation and allocation is mired in ethical debate because of this limited availability of organs for transplant
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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One-child Policy
The one-child policy, a part of the family planning policy, was a population planning policy of China. It was introduced in 1979 and began to be formally phased out near the end of 2015 and the beginning of 2016. The policy was only enforced on Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and allowed exceptions for many groups, including ethnic minorities. In 2007, 36% of China's population was subject to a strict one-child restriction, with an additional 53% being allowed to have a second child if the first child was a girl. Provincial governments imposed fines for violations, and the local and national governments created commissions to raise awareness and carry out registration and inspection work. According to the Chinese government, 400 million births were prevented
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Laogai Museum
The Laogai
Laogai
Museum is a museum in Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C., which showcases human rights in the People's Republic of China, focusing particularly on the laogai, the Chinese prison system.[1][2] The creation of the museum was spearheaded by Harry Wu, a well-known Chinese dissident who himself served 19 years in laogai prisons;[1][2] it was supported by the Yahoo!
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Harry Wu
Harry Wu
Harry Wu
(Chinese: 吴弘达; pinyin: Wú Hóngdá; February 8, 1937 – April 26, 2016) was a Chinese-American human rights activist. Wu spent 19 years in Chinese labor camps, and he became a resident and citizen of the United States. In 1992, he founded the Laogai
Laogai
Research Foundation.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and education 1.2 Labor camp years 1.3 Early years in the U.S. 1.4 Focus on the laogai regime2 Recognition 3 Lawsuits 4 Death 5 Books 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and education[edit] Wu was born into an affluent family in Shanghai; his father was a banking official and his mother "had descended from a family of well-to-do landlords." Wu recalled:My youth was one of peace and pleasure. Then in 1949 came the communist revolution, led by Mao. My life changed dramatically. During my teen-age years, my father lost all his properties. We had money problems
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Laogai
Laogai
Laogai
(勞改/劳改), the abbreviation for Láodòng Gǎizào (勞動改造/劳动改造), which means "reform through labor", is a slogan of the Chinese criminal justice system and has been used to refer to the use of penal labour and prison farms in the People's Republic of China (PRC). Laogai
Laogai
is different from laojiao, or re-education through labor, which was an administrative detention system for people who were not criminals but had committed minor offenses, and was intended to reform offenders into law-abiding citizens.[1] Persons detained under laojiao were detained in facilities that were separate from the general prison system of laogai
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Laogai Research Foundation
The Laogai
Laogai
Research Foundation is a human rights NGO located in Washington, D.C, United States. The foundation's mission is to "gather information on and raise public awareness of the Laogai—China's extensive system of forced-labor prison camps."[1] History[edit] The Laogai
Laogai
Research Foundation was founded in 1992 by Harry Wu, a former political prisoner in the People's Republic of China. Born in 1937 to a prosperous Shanghai family, Wu fell afoul of the Chinese Communist Party while in college and was deemed a counter-revolutionary rightist during the Anti-Rightist Movement.[2] Wu was arrested in 1960 and sent to the Laogai, and he was eventually released some 19 years later. He emigrated to the United States in 1982 and began to publicize the systematic human rights abuses inflicted upon the Chinese people by the CCP
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.