HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Laogai
Laogai
Laogai
(勞改/劳改), the abbreviation for Láodòng Gǎizào (勞動改造/劳动改造), which means "reform through labor", is a slogan of the Chinese criminal justice system and has been used to refer to the use of penal labour and prison farms in the People's Republic of China (PRC). Laogai
Laogai
is different from laojiao, or re-education through labor, which was an administrative detention system for people who were not criminals but had committed minor offenses, and was intended to reform offenders into law-abiding citizens.[1] Persons detained under laojiao were detained in facilities that were separate from the general prison system of laogai
[...More...]

picture info

Guangxi
Coordinates: 23°36′N 108°18′E / 23.6°N 108.3°E / 23.6; 108.3This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Chinese. (July 2014) Click [show] for important translation instructions.View a machine-translated version of the Chinese article. Google's machine translation is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English. Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article. You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation
[...More...]

picture info

Excrement
Feces
Feces
(or faeces) are the solid or semisolid remains of the food that could not be digested in the small intestine. Bacteria in the large intestine further break down the material.[1][2] Feces
Feces
contain a relatively small amount of metabolic waste products such as bacterially altered bilirubin, and the dead epithelial cells from the lining of the gut.[1] Feces
Feces
are discharged through the anus or cloaca during a process called defecation. Feces
Feces
can be used as fertilizer or soil conditioner in agriculture. It can also be burned and used as a fuel source or dried and used as a construction material. Some medicinal uses have been found. In the case of human feces, fecal transplants or fecal bacteriotherapy are in use
[...More...]

picture info

Gansu
Gansu
Gansu
(Chinese: 甘肃, Tibetan: ཀན་སུའུ་ Kan su'u[4]) is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the northwest of the country. It lies between the Tibetan and Loess plateaus, and borders Mongolia, Inner Mongolia, and Ningxia
Ningxia
to the north, Xinjiang
Xinjiang
and Qinghai
Qinghai
to the west, Sichuan
Sichuan
to the south, and Shaanxi
Shaanxi
to the east. The Yellow River passes through the southern part of the province. Gansu
Gansu
has a population of 26 million (as of 2009) and covers an area of 425,800 square kilometres (164,400 sq mi). The capital is Lanzhou, located in the southeast part of the province. The State of Qin
State of Qin
originated in what is now southeastern Gansu, and went on to form the first dynasty of Imperial China
[...More...]

picture info

Cannibalism
Cannibalism
Cannibalism
is the act of one individual of a species consuming all or part of another individual of the same species as food. To consume the same species or show cannibalistic behavior is a common ecological interaction in the animal kingdom and has been recorded for more than 1,500 species.[1] Human cannibalism
Human cannibalism
is well-documented, both in ancient and recent times.[2] Cannibalism, however, does not—as once believed—occur only as a result of extreme food shortage or artificial/unnatural conditions, but could also occur under natural conditions in a variety of species.[1][3][4] Cannibalism
Cannibalism
seems to be especially prevalent in aquatic ecosystems, in which up to approximately 90% of the organisms engage in cannibalistic activity at some point in their life cycle
[...More...]

picture info

Chinese Communist Party
The Communist Party of China
China
(CPC), often referred to as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the founding and ruling political party of the People's Republic of China. The Communist Party is the sole governing party of China, permitting only eight other, subordinated parties to co-exist, those making up the United Front. It was founded in 1921, chiefly by Chen Duxiu and Li Dazhao. The party grew quickly and by 1949 it had driven the nationalist Kuomintang
Kuomintang
(KMT) government from mainland China
China
after the Chinese Civil War, thus leading to the establishment of the People's Republic of China
[...More...]

picture info

Bed Bug
Bed
Bed
bugs are parasitic insects of the cimicid family that feed exclusively on blood. Cimex lectularius, the common bed bug, is the best known as it prefers to feed on human blood; other Cimex species specialize in other animals, e.g., bat bugs, such as Cimex pipistrelli (Europe), Cimex pilosellus (Western United States), and Cimex adjunctus (entire Eastern United States).[2] The name bed bug derives from the preferred habitat of Cimex lectularius: warm houses and especially near or inside beds and bedding or other sleep areas. Bed
Bed
bugs are mainly active at night, but are not exclusively nocturnal. They usually feed on their hosts without being noticed.[3][4][5] A number of adverse health effects may results from bed bug bites, including skin rashes, psychological effects, and allergic symptoms.[6] Bed
Bed
bugs are not known to transmit any pathogens as disease vectors
[...More...]

picture info

Wheal Response
A cutaneous condition is any medical condition that affects the integumentary system—the organ system that encloses the body and includes skin, hair, nails, and related muscle and glands.[1] The major function of this system is as a barrier against the external environment.[2] Conditions of the human integumentary system constitute a broad spectrum of diseases, also known as dermatoses, as well as many nonpathologic states (like, in certain circumstances, melanonychia and racquet nails).[3][4] While only a small number of skin diseases account for most visits to the physician, thousands of skin conditions have been described.[5] Classification of these conditions often presents many nosological challenges, since underlying causes and pathogenetics are often not known.[6][7] Therefore, most current textbooks present a classification based on location (for example, conditions of the mucous membrane), morphology (chronic blistering conditions), cause (skin conditions resulting from phys
[...More...]

picture info

Lice
Anoplura Rhyncophthirina Ischnocera Amblycera Louse
Louse
(plural: lice) is the common name for members of the order Phthiraptera, which contains nearly 5,000 species of wingless insect. Lice are obligate parasites, living externally on warm-blooded hosts which include every species of bird and mammal, except for monotremes, pangolins, and bats. Lice are vectors of diseases such as typhus. Chewing lice live among the hairs or feathers of their host and feed on skin and debris, while sucking lice pierce the host's skin and feed on blood and other secretions. They usually spend their whole life on a single host, cementing their eggs, which are known as nits, to hairs or feathers. The eggs hatch into nymphs, which moult three times before becoming fully grown, a process that takes about four weeks. Humans host three species of louse, the head louse, the body louse and the pubic louse
[...More...]

picture info

Insecticide
Insecticides are substances used to kill insects.[1] They include ovicides and larvicides used against insect eggs and larvae, respectively. Insecticides are used in agriculture, medicine, industry and by consumers. Insecticides are claimed to be a major factor behind the increase in the 20th-century's agricultural productivity.[2] Nearly all insecticides have the potential to significantly alter ecosystems; many are toxic to humans and/or animals; some become concentrated as they spread along the food chain. Insecticides can be classified into two major groups: systemic insecticides, which have residual or long term activity; and contact insecticides, which have no residual activity. Furthermore, one can distinguish three types of insecticide. 1. Natural insecticides, such as nicotine, pyrethrum and neem extracts, made by plants as defenses against insects. 2. Inorganic insecticides, which are metals. 3
[...More...]

picture info

Flea
Ceratophyllomorpha Hystrichopsyllomorpha Pulicomorpha PygiopsyllomorphaSynonymsAphanipteraFleas are small flightless insects that form the order Siphonaptera. As external parasites of mammals and birds, they live by consuming the blood of their hosts. Adults are up to about 3 mm (0.12 in) long and usually brown. Bodies flattened sideways enable them to move through their host's fur or feathers; strong claws prevent them from being dislodged. They lack wings, and have mouthparts adapted for piercing skin and sucking blood and hind legs adapted for jumping. The latter enable them to leap a distance of some 50 times their body length, a feat second only to jumps made by froghoppers. Larvae are worm-like with no limbs; they have chewing mouthparts and feed on organic debris. Over 2,500 species of fleas have been described worldwide
[...More...]

picture info

Roundworms
(see text)SynonymsNematodes Burmeister, 1837 Nematoidea
Nematoidea
sensu stricto Cobb, 1919 Nemates Cobb, 1919 Nemata Cobb, 1919 emend.The nematodes (UK: /ˈnɛmətoʊdz/, US: /ˈniːməˌtoʊdz/) or roundworms constitute the phylum Nematoda (also called Nemathelminthes).[2][3] They are a diverse animal phylum inhabiting a broad range of environments
[...More...]

picture info

Fertilizer
A fertilizer (American English) or fertiliser (British English; see spelling differences) is any material of natural or synthetic origin (other than liming materials) that is applied to soils or to plant tissues to supply one or more plant nutrients essential to the growth of plants.Contents1 Mechanism 2 Classification2.1 Single nutrient ("straight") fertilizers 2.2 Multinutrient fertilizers2.2.1 Binary (NP, NK, PK) fertilizers 2.2.2 NPK fertilizers2.3 Micronutrients3 Production3.1 Nitrogen
Nitrogen
fertilizers 3.2
[...More...]

picture info

Famine
A famine is a widespread scarcity of food,[1] caused by several factors including war, inflation, crop failure, population imbalance, or government policies. This phenomenon is usually accompanied or followed by regional malnutrition, starvation, epidemic, and increased mortality. Every inhabited continent in the world has experienced a period of famine throughout history. In the 19th and 20th century, it was generally Southeast and South Asia, as well as Eastern and Central Europe
Europe
that suffered the most deaths from famine. The numbers dying from famine began to fall sharply from the 1970s. Some countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, continue to have extreme cases of famine. Since 2010, Africa
Africa
has been the most affected continent in the world
[...More...]

picture info

Beriberi
Thiamine
Thiamine
deficiency, also known as beriberi, is a condition that occurs due to not enough thiamine (vitamin B1).[1] There are two main types: wet beriberi, and dry beriberi.[1] Wet beriberi results in a fast heart rate, shortness of breath, and leg swelling.[1] Dry beriberi results in numbness of the hands and feet, confusion, trouble moving the legs, and pain.[1] A form with loss of appetite and constipation may also occur.[3] Risk factors include a diet of mostly white rice, alcoholism, dialysis, chronic diarrhea, and taking high doses of diuretics.[1][4] Rarely it may be due to a genetic condition which results in dif
[...More...]

picture info

Edema
Edema, also spelled oedema or œdema, is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the interstitium, located beneath the skin and in the cavities of the body, which can cause severe pain. Clinically, edema manifests as swelling. The amount of interstitial fluid is determined by the balance of fluid homeostasis; and the increased secretion of fluid into the interstitium. The word is from Greek οἴδημα oídēma meaning "swelling".[1]Contents1 Classifications1.1 Generalized 1.2 Organ-specific2 Mechanism 3 Treatment 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksClassifications[edit] Cutaneous
Cutaneous
edema is referred to as "pitting" when, after pressure is applied to a small area, the indentation persists after the release of the pressure. Peripheral pitting edema, as shown in the illustration, is the more common type, resulting from water retention
[...More...]

.