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Laney College
900 Fallon Street Oakland, California
Oakland, California
94607, Oakland, California, United StatesCampus Urban: 60 acres (0.24 km²)Colors Forest Green and SilverNickname EaglesAffiliations California
California
Community Colleges and Peralta Community College DistrictMascot Eddie the EagleWebsite http://www.laney.edu Laney College
Laney College
is a community college located in Oakland, California, near the Lake Merritt
Lake Merritt
BART station and the Kaiser Convention Center. Laney is the largest of the four colleges of the Peralta Community College District which serves northern Alameda County. Laney College is named after Joseph Clarence Laney.[2] Laney College
Laney College
originally opened in 1953 as Oakland City College, at the former University High School campus (which operated from 1923 to 1948)
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Community College
A community college is a type of educational institution. The term can have different meanings in different countries, but usually refers to an educational institution that provides workforce education and college transfer academic programs. Some institutions maintain athletic teams and dormitories similar to their four-year counterparts.Contents1 Australia 2 Canada 3 India 4 Malaysia 5 Philippines 6 United Kingdom 7 United States 8 Research 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksAustralia[edit] In Australia, the term "community college" refers to small private businesses running short (e.g. 6 weeks) courses generally of a self-improvement or hobbyist nature. Equivalent to the American notion of community colleges are Tertiary And Further Education colleges or TAFEs; these are institutions mostly regulated at state and territory level
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Alameda, California
Alameda (/ˌæləˈmiːdə/ AL-ə-MEE-də; Spanish: [ala'meða]) is a city in Alameda County, California, United States. It is located on Alameda Island
Alameda Island
and Bay Farm Island, and is adjacent to and south of Oakland and east of San Francisco
San Francisco
across the San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay. Bay Farm Island, a portion of which is also known as "Harbor Bay Isle", is not actually an island, and is part of the mainland adjacent to the Oakland International Airport. The city's estimated 2017 population was 79,928.[11] Alameda is a charter city, rather than a general law city, allowing the city to provide for any form of government
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Tommy Wiseau
Tommy Wiseau
Tommy Wiseau
(/wɪˈzoʊ/,[1] /ˈwaɪzoʊ/)[2] is an American actor and filmmaker
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KGPC-LP
KGPC-LP is a low power radio station broadcasting in a community radio format from Oakland, California. History[edit] KGPC-LP began broadcasting on February 6, 2015.[1] References[edit]^ "Call Sign History for KGPC-LP". Retrieved 28 July 2016. External links[edit]Query the FCC's FM station database for KGPC Radio-Locator information on KGPC-LP Query Nielsen Audio's FM station database for KGPCThis article about a radio station in California is a stub
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Low-power Broadcasting
Low-power broadcasting refers to a broadcast station operating at a low electrical power to a smaller service area than "full power" stations within the same region, but often distinguished from "micropower broadcasting" (more commonly "microbroadcasting") and broadcast translators. LPFM, LPAM and LPTV are in various levels of use across the world, varying widely based on the laws and their enforcement.Contents1 Canada 2 New Zealand 3 United Kingdom 4 United States4.1 FM radio4.1.1 LPFM classes 4.1.2 Legislation4.1.2.1 Origins of LPFM 4.1.2.2 Radio Broadcasting Preservation Act of 2000 4.1.2.3 Local Community Radio Act of 2005 4.1.2.4 Local Community Radio Act of 2007 4.1.2.5 Local Community Radio Act of 2009 4.1.2.6 Local Community Radio Act of 20104.1.3 Arguments for LPFM 4.1.4 Arguments against LPFM 4.1.5 LPFM vs
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Chancellor (education)
A chancellor is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus. In most Commonwealth and former Commonwealth nations, the chancellor is usually a ceremonial non-resident head of the university. In such institutions, the chief executive of a university is the vice-chancellor, who may carry an additional title, such as "president & vice-chancellor". The chancellor may serve as chairman of the governing body; if not, this duty is often held by a chairman who may be known as a pro-chancellor. In many countries, the administrative and educational head of the university is known as the president, principal or rector. In the United States, the head of a university is most commonly a university president. In U.S
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Kaiser Shipyards
The Kaiser Shipyards
Kaiser Shipyards
were seven major shipbuilding yards located on the United States
United States
west coast during World War II. Kaiser ranked 20th among U.S. corporations in the value of wartime production contracts.[1] The shipyards were owned by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, a creation of American industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, (1882-1967), who established the shipbuilding company around 1939 in order to help meet the construction goals set by the United States Maritime Commission for merchant shipping. Four of the Kaiser Shipyards
Kaiser Shipyards
were located in Richmond, California
Richmond, California
and were called the Richmond Shipyards
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Oakland Estuary
Coordinates: 37°47′41.02″N 122°18′54.92″W / 37.7947278°N 122.3152556°W / 37.7947278; -122.3152556A view over the estuary from above Coast Guard Island. Alameda is on the left, with Oakland on the right and San Francisco Bay
San Francisco Bay
in the distance.The Oakland Estuary
Oakland Estuary
is the strait in the San Francisco Bay
San Francisco Bay
Area, California, separating the cities of Oakland and Alameda and the Alameda Island
Alameda Island
from the East Bay mainland. On its western end, it connects to San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay, while its eastern end connects to San Leandro Bay.Contents1 Crossings 2 Early history 3 Rowing 4 Notes 5 See alsoCrossings[edit] The Estuary is spanned by two underwater tubes and three bridges
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Lecture Hall
A lecture hall (or lecture theatre) is a large room used for instruction, typically at a college or university. Unlike a traditional classroom with a capacity normally between one and fifty, the capacity of lecture halls is typically measured in the hundreds. Lecture
Lecture
halls almost always have a pitched floor, so that those in the rear are sat higher than those at the front (i.e., tiered seating), allowing them to see the lecturer. The importance of lecture halls is so significant that some schools of architecture have offered courses exclusively centered on their design
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Gym
A gymnasium, also known as a gym, is an open air or covered location for gymnastics, athletics, and gymnastic services. The word is derived from the ancient Greek gymnasium.[1] They are commonly found in athletic and fitness centers, and as activity and learning spaces in educational institutions. "Gym" is also slang for "fitness center", which is often an indoor facility. Gymnasia apparatus such as barbells, parallel bars, jumping board, running path, tennis-balls, cricket field, fencing area, and so forth are used as exercises. In safe weather, outdoor locations are the most conducive to health.[2] Gyms were popular in ancient Greece. Their curricula included Gymnastica militaria or self-defense, gymnastica medica, or physical therapy to help the sick and injured, and gymnastica athletica for physical fitness and sports, from boxing to dancing.[3] These gymnasia also had teachers of wisdom and philosophy
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Academic Library
An academic library is a library that is attached to a higher education institution which serves two complementary purposes to support the school's curriculum, and to support the research of the university faculty and students.[1] It is unknown how many academic libraries there are internationally. An academic and research portal maintained by UNESCO
UNESCO
links to 3,785 libraries. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, there are an estimated 3,700 academic libraries in the United States.[1] The support of teaching and learning requires material for class readings and for student papers. In the past, the material for class readings, intended to supplement lectures as prescribed by the instructor, has been called reserves
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Theater (structure)
A theater, theatre or playhouse, is a structure where theatrical works or plays are performed, or other performances such as musical concerts may be produced. While a theater is not required for performance (as in environmental theater or street theater), a theater serves to define the performance and audience spaces. The facility is traditionally organized to provide support areas for performers, the technical crew and the audience members. There are as many types of theaters as there are types of performance. Theaters may be built specifically for a certain types of productions, they may serve for more general performance needs or they may be adapted or converted for use as a theater. They may range from open-air amphitheaters to ornate, cathedral-like structures to simple, undecorated rooms or black box theaters
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Student Center
A student center is a type of building found on university campuses. In the United States, such a building may be called a student union, student commons, union or student center. The term "student union" refers most often in the United States
United States
to a building, while in other nations a "students' union" is the student government. Nevertheless, the Association of College Unions International (largely US-based) has several hundred campus organizational members in the US; there is no sharp dichotomy in interpretation of union in this context. The US usage in reference to a location is simply a shortened form of student union building.Contents1 History 2 Purpose 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first student union in America was Houston Hall, at the University of Pennsylvania, which opened January 2, 1896[1] and remains in operation to this day
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Quadrangle (architecture)
In architecture, a quadrangle (or colloquially, a quad) is a space or courtyard, usually rectangular (square or oblong) in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building (or several smaller buildings). The word is probably most closely associated with college or university campus architecture, but quadrangles are also found in other buildings such as palaces. Most quadrangles are open-air, though a few have been roofed over (often with glass), to provide additional space for social meeting areas or coffee shops for students. The word quadrangle was originally synonymous with quadrilateral, but this usage is now relatively uncommon.[1] Some modern quadrangles resemble cloister gardens of medieval monasteries, called garths, which were usually square or rectangular, enclosed by covered arcades or cloisters
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