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Landscape Format
Page orientation
Page orientation
is the right way in which a rectangular page is oriented for normal viewing. The two most common types of orientation are portrait and landscape. The specific word definition comes from the fact that a close-up portrait of a person's face and upper body is more fitting for a canvas or photo where the height of the display area is greater than the width, and is more common for the pages of books. Landscape originally described artistic outdoor scenes where a wide view area is needed, but the upper part of the painting would be mostly sky and so is omitted. Page orientation
Page orientation
is also used to describe the dymensions of a video display
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Page (paper)
A page is one side of a leaf (or sheet) of paper, parchment or other material (or electronic media) in a book, magazine, newspaper, or other collection of sheets, on which text or illustrations can be printed, written or drawn, to create documents. It can be used as a measure of communicating general quantity of information ("That topic covers twelve pages") or more specific quantity ("there are 535 words in a standard page in standard font type")[1]Contents1 The page in typography 2 The page in English lexicon 3 The page in library science 4 The printed page in computing4.1 Printed page in Web5 ReferencesThe page in typography[edit] In a book, the side of a leaf one reads first is called the recto page, and the back side of that leaf is called the verso page. In a spread, one reads the verso page first and then reads the recto page of the next leaf. In English-language books, the recto page is on the right and the verso page is on the left
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WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
(/ˈwɪziwɪɡ/ WIZ-ee-wig)[1] is an acronym for "what you see is what you get". In computing, a WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
editor is a system in which content (text and graphics) can be edited in a form closely resembling its appearance when printed or displayed as a finished product,[2] such as a printed document, web page, or slide presentation.Contents1 Meaning 2 History2.1 Etymology3 Criticism 4 Related acronyms 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMeaning[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The program on the left uses a WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
editor to produce a Lorem Ipsum document
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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General Services Administration
The General Services Administration
General Services Administration
(GSA), an independent agency of the United States government, was established in 1949 to help manage and support the basic functioning of federal agencies. GSA supplies products and communications for U.S. government offices, provides transportation and office space to federal employees, and develops government-wide cost-minimizing policies and other management tasks.[3] GSA employs about 12,000 federal workers and has an annual operating budget of roughly $26.3 billion. GSA oversees $66 billion of procurement annually. It contributes to the management of about $500 billion in U.S. federal property, divided chiefly among 8,300 owned and leased buildings and a 210,000 vehicle motor pool
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Copyright Status Of Work By The U.S. Government
A work of the United States
United States
government, as defined by the United States copyright law, is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties."[1] In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act,[2] such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This act only applies to U.S. domestic copyright as that is the extent of U.S. federal law. The U.S. government asserts that it can still hold the copyright to those works in other countries.[3][4] Publication of an otherwise protected work by the U.S. government does not put that work in the public domain. For example, government publications may include works copyrighted by a contractor or grantee; copyrighted material assigned to the U.S
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Shoot 'em Up
Shoot 'em up
Shoot 'em up
(also known as shmup or STG[1][2]) is a subgenre of the shooter genre of video games. In a shoot 'em up, the player character moves forward automatically, often in a flying vehicle such as a spacecraft or aircraft, shooting large numbers of enemies while dodging obstacles. There is no consensus as to which design elements compose a shoot 'em up. Some restrict the definition to games featuring spacecraft and certain types of character movement; others allow a broader definition including characters on foot and a variety of perspectives. Shoot 'em ups call for fast reactions and for the player to memorize levels and enemy attack patterns. "Bullet hell" games feature overwhelming numbers of enemy projectiles. The genre's origins can be traced back to Spacewar!, one of the earliest computer games, developed in 1962 and eventually released in amusement arcades in the early 1970s
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MAME
MAME
MAME
(originally an acronym of Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator) is a free and open source emulator designed to recreate the hardware of arcade game systems in software on modern personal computers and other platforms.[1] The intention is to preserve gaming history by preventing vintage games from being lost or forgotten. The aim of MAME is to be a reference to the inner workings of the emulated arcade machines; the ability to actually play the games is considered "a nice side effect".[2] Joystiq
Joystiq
has listed MAME
MAME
as an application that every gamer should have.[3] The first public MAME
MAME
release (0.1) was on February 5, 1997, by Nicola Salmoria. The emulator now supports over seven thousand unique games and ten thousand actual ROM image
ROM image
sets, though not all of the supported games are playable
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Vectrex
The Vectrex
Vectrex
is a vector display-based home video game console that was developed by Western Technologies/Smith Engineering.[1] It was licensed and distributed first by General Consumer Electronics (GCE), and then by Milton Bradley Company
Milton Bradley Company
after its purchase of GCE. It was released in November 1982 at a retail price of $199 ($490 adjusted for inflation[2]); as Milton Bradley took over international marketing the price dropped to $150, then reduced again to $100 shortly before the video game crash of 1983 and finally retailed at $49 after the crash.[3] The Vectrex
Vectrex
exited the console market in early 1984. Unlike other non-portable video game consoles, which connected to televisions and rendered raster graphics, the Vectrex
Vectrex
has an integrated vector monitor which displays vector graphics
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Donkey Kong
Donkey Kong
Donkey Kong
(ドンキーコング, Donkī Kongu, [doŋ.kiː koŋ.ɡɯ]) is a series of video games featuring the adventures of an ape-like character called Donkey Kong, conceived by Shigeru Miyamoto in 1981. The franchise mainly comprises two different game genres, plus spin-off titles of various genres. The games of the first genre are mostly single-screen platform/action puzzle types, featuring Donkey Kong
Donkey Kong
as the opponent in an industrial construction setting. Donkey Kong
Donkey Kong
first made his appearance in the 1981 arcade machine called Donkey Kong, in which he faced Mario, now Nintendo's flagship character. This game was also the first appearance of Mario, pre-dating the well-known Super Mario
Mario
Bros
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Pac-Man
Pac-Man
Pac-Man
(Japanese: パックマン, Hepburn: Pakkuman), stylized as PAC-MAN, is an arcade game developed by Namco
Namco
and first released in Japan
Japan
in May 1980.[2][3] It was created by Japanese video game designer Toru Iwatani. It was licensed for distribution in the United States by Midway Games
Midway Games
and released in October 1980
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Tablet Computer
A tablet computer, commonly shortened to tablet, is a portable personal computer, typically with a mobile operating system and LCD touchscreen display processing circuitry, and a rechargeable battery in a single thin, flat package. Tablets, being computers, do what other personal computers do, but lack some I/O
I/O
capabilities that others have. Modern tablets largely resemble modern smartphones, the only differences being that tablets are relatively larger than smartphones, with screens 7 inches (18 cm) or larger, measured diagonally,[1][2][3][4] and may not support access to a cellular network. The touchscreen display is operated by gestures executed by finger or stylus instead of the mouse, trackpad, and keyboard of larger computers. Portable computers can be classified according to the presence and appearance of physical keyboards
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Radius (hardware Company)
Radius was an American computer hardware firm founded in May 1986 by Burrell Smith, Andy Hertzfeld, Mike Boich, Matt Carter, Alain Rossmann and other members of the original Mac team. The company specialized in Macintosh peripherals and accessory equipment
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Aldus PageMaker
PageMaker was one of the first desktop publishing programs, introduced in 1985 by Aldus
Aldus
on the Apple Macintosh.[2] The combination of PageMaker using the Mac's graphical user interface for document creation and the Apple LaserWriter
Apple LaserWriter
for output represented the starting point of what became the desktop publishing revolution in the late 1980s. Ported to PCs running Windows 1.0
Windows 1.0
in 1987,[3] PageMaker helped to popularize the Macintosh platform and the Windows environment.[4][5] A key aspect of PageMaker's success was its native support for Adobe Systems' PostScript
PostScript
page description language. Adobe purchased Aldus, and PageMaker, in 1994. The program remained a major force in the high-end DPT market through the early 1990s, but new features were slow in coming
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Page Layout
Page layout
Page layout
is the part of graphic design that deals in the arrangement of visual elements on a page. It generally involves organizational principles of composition to achieve specific communication objectives.[1] The high-level page layout involves deciding on the overall arrangement of text and images, and possibly on the size or shape of the medium. It requires intelligence, sentience, and creativity, and is informed by culture, psychology, and what the document authors and editors wish to communicate and emphasize. Low-level pagination and typesetting are more mechanical processes. Given certain parameters - boundaries of text areas, the typeface, font size, and justification preference can be done in a straightforward way. Until desktop publishing became dominant, these processes were still done by people, but in modern publishing they are almost always automated
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Macintosh
The Macintosh
Macintosh
(/ˈmækɪnˌtɒʃ/ MAK-in-tosh; branded as Mac since 1998) is a family of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Inc.
Apple Inc.
since January 1984
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