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Lamentation Of Christ
The Lamentation of Christ[1] is a very common subject in Christian art from the High Middle Ages
High Middle Ages
to the Baroque.[2] After Jesus was crucified, his body was removed from the cross and his friends mourned over his body. This event has been depicted by many different artists. Lamentation works are very often included in cycles of the Life of Christ, and also form the subject of many individual works. One specific type of Lamentation depicts only Jesus' mother Mary cradling his body
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Gothic Art
Gothic art
Gothic art
was a style of medieval art that developed in Northern France out of Romanesque art
Romanesque art
in the 12th century AD, led by the concurrent development of Gothic architecture. It spread to all of Western Europe, and much of Southern and Central Europe, never quite effacing more classical styles in Italy. In the late 14th century, the sophisticated court style of International Gothic
International Gothic
developed, which continued to evolve until the late 15th century. In many areas, especially Germany, Late Gothic art
Gothic art
continued well into the 16th century, before being subsumed into Renaissance
Renaissance
art. Primary media in the Gothic period included sculpture, panel painting, stained glass, fresco and illuminated manuscripts
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John The Apostle
John the Apostle
John the Apostle
(Aramaic: ܝܘܚܢܢ ܫܠܝܚܐ‎ Yohanān Shliḥā; Hebrew: יוחנן בן זבדי‬ Yohanan ben Zavdi; Koine Greek: Ιωάννης; Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ; Latin: Ioannes; c. AD 6-100) was one of the Twelve Apostles
Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
according to the New Testament, which refers to him as Ἰωάννης. Generally listed as the youngest apostle, he was the son of Zebedee
Zebedee
and Salome
Salome
or Joanna. His brother was James, who was another of the Twelve Apostles
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Cretan School
Cretan School
Cretan School
describes an important school of icon painting, under the umbrella of Post- Byzantine
Byzantine
art,[1] which flourished while Crete was under Venetian rule during the late Middle Ages, reaching its climax after the Fall of Constantinople, becoming the central force in Greek painting during the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries
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Sarcophagus
A sarcophagus (plural, sarcophagi) is a box-like funeral receptacle for a corpse, most commonly carved in stone, and usually displayed above ground, though it may also be buried. The word "sarcophagus" comes from the Greek σάρξ sarx meaning "flesh", and φαγεῖν phagein meaning "to eat", hence sarcophagus means "flesh-eating"; from the phrase lithos sarkophagos (λίθος σαρκοφάγος). Since lithos is Greek for "stone", lithos sarcophagos means, "flesh-eating stone". The word also came to refer to a particular kind of limestone that was thought to rapidly facilitate the decomposition of the flesh of corpses contained within it due to the chemical properties of the limestone itself.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 United States 3 Asia 4 Gallery 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksHistory[edit]Roman-era sarcophagi at Worms, Germany.Sarcophagi were most often designed to remain above ground
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Ugolino Lorenzetti
Bartolomeo Bulgarini (1300-1310 – 1378), also known as Bulgarino or Bologhini,[1] was an Italian painter of the Trecento period in Siena both before and after the Black Death.[2] Contents1 Early life 2 History 3 The St. Victor Altarpiece 4 Career 5 The Assumption of the Virgin and Doubting Thomas Altarpiece 6 Works 7 References 8 Further readingEarly life[edit] Born into a noble family with several members being elected into the Commune, Siena’s central governing body, several times.[3] He is firmly in the Sienese school of painting using a byzantine-esque figuration and traditional gold leaf aesthetic of Sienese painting. With his contemporaries, Simone Martini, Pietro Lorenzetti and Ambrogio Lorenzetti and others he is part of the generations following Duccio
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Early Netherlandish Painting
Early Netherlandish painting
Early Netherlandish painting
is the work of artists, sometimes known as the Flemish Primitives, active in the Burgundian and Habsburg Netherlands
Netherlands
during the 15th- and 16th-century Northern Renaissance; especially in the flourishing cities of Bruges, Ghent, Mechelen, Louvain, Tournai
Tournai
and Brussels, all in contemporary Belgium. Their work follows the International Gothic
International Gothic
style and begins approximately with Robert Campin
Robert Campin
and Jan van Eyck
Jan van Eyck
in the early 1420s. It lasts at least until the death of Gerard David
Gerard David
in 1523,[1] although many scholars extend it to the start of the Dutch Revolt
Dutch Revolt
in 1566 or 1568 (Max J. Friedländer's acclaimed surveys run through Pieter Bruegel the Elder)
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Gerard David
Gerard David
Gerard David
(c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp
Antwerp
guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp
Antwerp
and Bruges.[2] Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.Contents1 Life 2 Style 3 Works 4 Legacy 5 Gallery 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Sources7 External linksLife[edit]Angel AnnunciationHe was born in Oudewater, now located in the province of Utrecht. His year of birth is approximated as c
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The Three Marys
The Three Marys
The Three Marys
or Maries is a term referring to the women mentioned in the canonical gospels narratives of the Crucifixion and the Resurrection, several of whom were, or have been considered by Christian tradition, to have been named Mary (a very common name for Jewish women of the period).[1][2] The Gospels
Gospels
give the name Mary to several individuals
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Donor Portrait
A donor portrait or votive portrait is a portrait in a larger painting or other work showing the person who commissioned and paid for the image, or a member of his, or (much more rarely) her, family. Donor portrait usually refers to the portrait or portraits of donors alone, as a section of a larger work, whereas votive portrait may often refer to a whole work of art, including for example a Madonna, especially if the donor is very prominent. The terms are not used very consistently by art historians, as Angela Marisol Roberts points out,[1] and may also be used for smaller religious subjects that were probably made to be retained by the commissioner rather than donated to a church. Donor portraits are very common in religious works of art, especially paintings, of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Renaissance, the donor usually shown kneeling to one side, in the foreground of the image
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Art Theft
Art theft
Art theft
is usually for the purpose of resale or for ransom (sometimes called artnapping). Stolen art is sometimes used by criminals as collateral to secure loans.[1] Only a small percentage of stolen art is recovered—estimates range from 5 to 10%
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Sotheby's
Sotheby's
Sotheby's
/ˈsʌðəbiz/ is a British multinational corporation headquartered in New York City. One of the world's largest brokers of fine and decorative art, jewelry, real estate, and collectibles, Sotheby's
Sotheby's
operation is divided into three segments: auction, finance, and dealer. The company’s services range from corporate art services to private sales. It is named after one of its cofounders, John Sotheby. Sotheby's
Sotheby's
is the world’s fourth oldest auction house in continuous operation, with 90 locations in 40 countries. As of December 2011, the company had 1,446 employees worldwide. It is the world's largest art business with global sales in 2011 totalling $5.8 billion.[3] Sotheby's
Sotheby's
was established on 11 March 1744 in London
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Stations Of The Cross
The Stations of the Cross
Stations of the Cross
or the Way of the Cross, also known as the Way of Sorrows or the Via Crucis, refers to a series of images depicting Jesus
Jesus
Christ on the day of his crucifixion and accompanying prayers. The stations grew out of imitations of Via Dolorosa
Via Dolorosa
in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
which is believed to be the actual path Jesus
Jesus
walked to Mount Calvary. The object of the stations is to help the Christians faithful to make a spiritual pilgrimage through contemplation of the Passion of Christ
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Seven Sorrows Of The Virgin
Our Lady of Sorrows (Latin: Beata Maria Virgo Perdolens), Our Lady of Dolours, the Sorrowful Mother or Mother of Sorrows (Latin: Mater Dolorosa), and Our Lady of Piety, Our Lady of the Seven Sorrows or Our Lady of the Seven Dolours are names by which the Virgin Mary is referred to in relation to sorrows in her life. As Mater Dolorosa, it is also a key subject for Marian art in the Catholic Church. The Seven Sorrows of Mary are a popular Roman Catholic devotion. In common religious Catholic imagery, the Virgin Mary is portrayed in a sorrowful and lacrimating affect, with seven long knives or daggers piercing her heart, often bleeding. Devotional prayers that consist of meditation began to elaborate on her Seven Sorrows based on the prophecy of Simeon
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La Rioja (Spain)
La Rioja (/lɑː riˈɒhɑː/; Spanish: [la ˈrjoxa]; Basque Errioxa [eriˡoʃa]) is an autonomous community and a province in Spain, located in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Its capital is Logroño. Other cities and towns in the province include Calahorra, Arnedo, Alfaro, Haro, Santo Domingo de la Calzada, and Nájera. It has an estimated population of 322,415 inhabitants (INE 2010), making it the least populated region of Spain. It covers part of the Ebro
Ebro
valley towards its north and the Iberian Range in the south. The community is a single province, so there is no County Council, and it is organized into 174 municipalities
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Nájera
Nájera
Nájera
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈna.xe.ɾa]) is a small town, former bishopric and now Latin Catholic titular see, former capital of the Kingdom of Navarre, located in the "Rioja Alta" region of La Rioja, northern Spain, on the river Najerilla. Nájera
Nájera
is a stopping point on the French Way
French Way
the most popular path on the Way of St James.Contents1 History 2 Ecclesiastical History2.1 Episcopal Ordinaries 2.2 Titular see3 Main sites 4 See also 5 Sources and external linksHistory[edit] The area attracted the Romans, who built the town of Tritium on land which now falls within the boundaries of Nájera
Nájera
and the neighbouring municipality of Tricio
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