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Lake Agassiz
Coordinates: 51°N 98°W / 51°N 98°W / 51; -98An early map of the extent of Lake Agassiz
Lake Agassiz
(by 19th century geologist Warren Upham). This map is now believed to underestimate the extent of the region once overlain by Lake Agassiz. Lake Agassiz
Lake Agassiz
was a very large glacial lake located in the middle of the northern part of North America. Fed by glacial meltwater at the end of the last glacial period, its area was larger than all of the modern Great Lakes
Great Lakes
combined[1] though its mean depth was not as great as that of many major lakes today. First postulated in 1823 by William H
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Minnesota River
The Minnesota
Minnesota
River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 332 miles (534 km) long, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Minnesota. It drains a watershed of nearly 17,000 square miles (44,000 km2), 14,751 square miles (38,200 km2) in Minnesota and about 2,000 sq mi (5,200 km2) in South Dakota
South Dakota
and Iowa. It rises in southwestern Minnesota, in Big Stone Lake
Big Stone Lake
on the Minnesota– South Dakota
South Dakota
border just south of the Laurentian Divide
Laurentian Divide
at the Traverse Gap
Traverse Gap
portage. It flows southeast to Mankato, then turns northeast. It joins the Mississippi south of the Twin Cities of Minneapolis
Minneapolis
and St. Paul, near the historic Fort Snelling. The valley is one of several distinct regions of Minnesota
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Clearwater River (Saskatchewan)
Clearwater
Clearwater
or Clear Water may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Other 4 See alsoPeople[edit]William H
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St. Croix River (Wisconsin–Minnesota)
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Kaministiquia River
The Kaministiquia River
River
/ˌkæmɪˈnɪstɪkwɑː/ is a river which empties into western Lake Superior
Lake Superior
at the city of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Kaministiquia (Gaa-ministigweyaa) is an Ojibwe word meaning "(river) with islands" due to two large islands (McKellar and Mission) at the mouth of the river. The delta has three branches or outlets, reflected on early North American maps in French as "les trois rivières" (the three rivers): the southernmost is known as the Mission River, the central branch as the McKellar River, and the northernmost branch as the Kaministiquia. Residents of the region commonly refer to the river as the Kam River. Water flow in the Kaministiquia River
River
system is regulated at the Dog Lake dams 1 and 2 and at the Greenwater, Kashabowie and Shebandowan dams
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Before Present
Before Present (BP) years is a time scale used mainly in geology and other scientific disciplines to specify when events occurred in the past. Because the "present" time changes, standard practice is to use 1 January 1950 as the commencement date of the age scale, reflecting the origin of practical radiocarbon dating in the 1950s
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Mendota, Minnesota
Mendota is a city in Dakota County, Minnesota, United States. The name is derived from the Dakota language, meaning "mouth or junction of one river with another.[7] The population was 198 at the 2010 census.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Notable residents and natives 5 Gallery of images 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The town was one of the first permanent settlements in the state of Minnesota, being founded around the same time as Fort Snelling. It also houses a small museum which used to be the Hypolite Du Puis house, the Henry Hastings Sibley
Henry Hastings Sibley
house, the Faribault house, and buildings associated with the American Fur Company, all dating from the 1830s.[8] The main route through the small city is State Highway 13, also known as Sibley Memorial Highway
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South Dakota
South Dakota
South Dakota
(/- dəˈkoʊtə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the Midwestern region of the United States. It is named after the Lakota and Dakota Sioux
Sioux
Native American tribes, who compose a large portion of the population and historically dominated the territory. South Dakota
South Dakota
is the seventeenth largest by area, but the fifth smallest by population and the 5th least densely populated of the 50 United States. As the southern part of the former Dakota Territory, South Dakota
South Dakota
became a state on November 2, 1889, simultaneously with North Dakota
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Gulf Of Mexico
The Gulf of Mexico
Mexico
(Spanish: Golfo de México) is an ocean basin and a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean,[1] largely surrounded by the North American continent.[2] It is bounded on the northeast, north and northwest by the Gulf Coast
Gulf Coast
of the United States, on the southwest and south by Mexico, and on the southeast by Cuba. The U.S. states of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama
Alabama
and Florida
Florida
border the Gulf on the north, which are often referred to as the "Third Coast" in comparison with the U.S
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Genesis Flood Narrative
The Genesis flood narrative (chapters 6–9 in the Book of Genesis) is the Hebrew flood myth.[1] The story tells of God's decision to return the Earth
Earth
to its pre-creation state of watery chaos and then remake it in a reversal of creation.[2] The narrative has very strong simularities to parts of the Epic of Gilgamesh which long predates the Book of Genesis. Scientists have unsuccessfully attempted to reconcile the flood narrative with physical findings in geology and palaeontology.[3]
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Arctic Ocean
The Arctic
Arctic
Ocean
Ocean
is the smallest and shallowest of the world's five major oceans.[1] The International Hydrographic Organization
International Hydrographic Organization
(IHO) recognizes it as an ocean, although some oceanographers call it the Arctic
Arctic
Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
or simply the Arctic
Arctic
Sea, classifying it a mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean.[2][3] It is also seen as the northernmost part of the all-encompassing World Ocean. Located mostly in the Arctic
Arctic
north polar region in the middle of the Northern Hemisphere, the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean
Ocean
is almost completely surrounded by Eurasia and North America. It is partly covered by sea ice throughout the year and almost completely in winter
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Freshwater
Fresh water
Fresh water
(or freshwater) is naturally occurring water on Earth's surface in ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, icebergs, bogs, ponds, lakes, rivers and streams, and underground as groundwater. Fresh water is generally characterized by having low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids. The term specifically excludes seawater and brackish water although it does include mineral-rich waters such as chalybeate springs. Fresh water
Fresh water
is not the same as potable water (or drinking water): Much of the earth's surface fresh water and groundwater is unsuitable for drinking without some form of treatment
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Human Civilization
A civilization or civilisation (see English spelling differences) is any complex society characterized by urban development, social stratification imposed by a cultural elite, symbolic systems of communication (for example, writing systems), and a perceived separation from and domination over the natural environment.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8] Civilizations are intimately associated with and often further defined by other socio-politico-economic characteristics, including centralization, the domestication of both humans and other organisms, specialization of labour, culturally ingrained ideologies of progress and supremacism, monumental architecture, taxation, societal dependence upon farming and expansionism.[2][3][4][6][7][8] Historically, a civilization was a so-called "advanced" culture in contrast to more supposedly primitive cultures.[1][3][4][9] In this broad sense, a civilization contrasts with non-centralized tribal societies, including the cultures of nomadic pastoralists, Neoli
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Sea Level Rise
A sea level rise is an increase in global mean sea level as a result of an increase in the volume of water in the world’s oceans. Sea level rise is usually attributed to global climate change by thermal expansion of the water in the oceans and by melting of ice sheets and glaciers on land.[3] The melting of floating ice shelves and icebergs at sea would raise sea levels only by about 4 cm (1.6 in).[4] Sea level
Sea level
rise at specific locations may be more or less than the global average. Local factors might include tectonic effects, subsidence of the land, tides, currents, storms, etc.[5] Sea level rise is expected to continue for centuries
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Canada–United States Border
The Canada– United States
United States
border, officially known as the International Boundary, is the longest international border in the world between two countries. It is shared between Canada
Canada
and the United States, the second- and fourth-largest countries by area, respectively. The terrestrial boundary (including portions of maritime boundaries in the Great Lakes, and on the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic coasts) is 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi) long, of which 2,475 kilometres (1,538 mi) is Canada's border with Alaska. Eight Canadian provinces and territories (Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick), and thirteen U.S
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